Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Vorpal
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby Vorpal » 11 Jan 2019, 11:42am

reohn2 wrote:It depends on the customers,if there's say six customers in the same 1 mile radius delivering to all six within say a 1 hour slot only works if those customers are available in that 1 hour.People maybe unavailable for all kinds of reasons,shiftwork,picking up children visiting friends,etc,etc.

Yes, but it could be possible to organise two sets of deliveries instead of 6. There are all sorts of ways to do it. The simplest is to offer the customer an incentive, such as a discount if they can choose a time that the delivery vehicle is already in the area.

Logistics firms do that sort of thing all the time. Good software already exists to manage it.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby reohn2 » 11 Jan 2019, 11:48am

Vorpal wrote:
reohn2 wrote:It depends on the customers,if there's say six customers in the same 1 mile radius delivering to all six within say a 1 hour slot only works if those customers are available in that 1 hour.People maybe unavailable for all kinds of reasons,shiftwork,picking up children visiting friends,etc,etc.

Yes, but it could be possible to organise two sets of deliveries instead of 6. There are all sorts of ways to do it. The simplest is to offer the customer an incentive, such as a discount if they can choose a time that the delivery vehicle is already in the area.

Logistics firms do that sort of thing all the time. Good software already exists to manage it.

I agree that two sets of drops would be easier to manage whereas one set of 6 drops is much harder to fit in with six customer's convenience.


Logistics firm doing larger drops to wholesalers etc is a far easier thing to manage I would think.

EDIT,post rewritten for clarity
Last edited by reohn2 on 11 Jan 2019, 12:02pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby Vorpal » 11 Jan 2019, 11:58am

reohn2 wrote:
Vorpal wrote:
reohn2 wrote:It depends on the customers,if there's say six customers in the same 1 mile radius delivering to all six within say a 1 hour slot only works if those customers are available in that 1 hour.People maybe unavailable for all kinds of reasons,shiftwork,picking up children visiting friends,etc,etc.

Yes, but it could be possible to organise two sets of deliveries instead of 6. There are all sorts of ways to do it. The simplest is to offer the customer an incentive, such as a discount if they can choose a time that the delivery vehicle is already in the area.

Logistics firms do that sort of thing all the time. Good software already exists to manage it.

Whilst I agree it would need some very fine tuning of the software to be effective.Logistics firm doing larger drops to wholesalers etc is a far easier thing to manage I would think.


Logistics firms have to manage a wide variety of deliveries, some of which are multiple containers, some of which are vehicles, some of which are small packages, some of which require temperature controls, or special handling, etc.

Package delivery firms use the same type of software.

Companies like DHL who do both bulk freight and deliver millions of individual packages around the world every day, it is the same thing. If DHL can manage it, I'm sure Tesco can.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby thirdcrank » 11 Jan 2019, 12:01pm

Companies like DHL who do both bulk freight and deliver millions of individual packages around the world every day, it is the same thing. If DHL can manage it, I'm sure Tesco can



If the future depends on how DHL deliver it, we are doomed.

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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby Vorpal » 11 Jan 2019, 12:01pm

thirdcrank wrote:
Companies like DHL who do both bulk freight and deliver millions of individual packages around the world every day, it is the same thing. If DHL can manage it, I'm sure Tesco can



If the future depends on how DHL deliver it, we are doomed.

:lol: :lol:
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby reohn2 » 11 Jan 2019, 12:19pm

Vorpal wrote:
reohn2 wrote:
Vorpal wrote:Yes, but it could be possible to organise two sets of deliveries instead of 6. There are all sorts of ways to do it. The simplest is to offer the customer an incentive, such as a discount if they can choose a time that the delivery vehicle is already in the area.

Logistics firms do that sort of thing all the time. Good software already exists to manage it.

Whilst I agree it would need some very fine tuning of the software to be effective.Logistics firm doing larger drops to wholesalers etc is a far easier thing to manage I would think.


Logistics firms have to manage a wide variety of deliveries, some of which are multiple containers, some of which are vehicles, some of which are small packages, some of which require temperature controls, or special handling, etc.

Package delivery firms use the same type of software.

Companies like DHL who do both bulk freight and deliver millions of individual packages around the world every day, it is the same thing. If DHL can manage it, I'm sure Tesco can.

I've rewritten the post above for clarity.
To continue package deliveries to housholds are notified in advance with options of being left with a neghbour,a safe place,drop it over the gate,behind the bin,or postpone the delivery day,in others words non perishable goods can be rescheduled for the convenience of the customer.
Food shopping deliveries are also for the convenience of the customer but are on a tighter schedule due to the customer needing to take delivery in person due to size and perishability of goods.
Customer is king and dictates time and day within reason without thinking of anyone else's convenience but their own.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby Vorpal » 11 Jan 2019, 12:30pm

reohn2 wrote:I've rewritten the post above for clarity.
To continue package deliveries to housholds are notified in advance with options of being left with a neghbour,a safe place,drop it over the gate,behind the bin,or postpone the delivery day,in others words non perishable goods can be rescheduled for the convenience of the customer.
Food shopping deliveries are also for the convenience of the customer but are on a tighter schedule due to the customer needing to take delivery in person due to size and perishability of goods.
Customer is king and dictates time and day within reason without thinking of anyone else's convenience but their own.

That may well be, but logistics firms deal with problems that are sometimes much more difficult, such as taking medicines with very limited life and requiring strict environmental controls to areas of the world where the only environmenal controls available are those shipped with the medicines. Or handling dangerous materials. Or volatile chemicals. And some packages contain perishables, as well. Amazon in the US now deliver food shopping, and restaurant meal orders in some areas, as well as internet purchases.

Not that I'm suggesting Tesco should hand over their delivery system to Amazon :lol:
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby mjr » 11 Jan 2019, 1:45pm

reohn2 wrote:They're providing a service and out to make a profit.

Offer customers a discount but making it smaller than the cost saving of nearby drops should make more profit.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby reohn2 » 11 Jan 2019, 1:53pm

I think there are big differences between ordering a takeaway meal delivery or a human heart for transplant even.
People ordering their weekly shopping don't want be waiting in all day every week,if there isn't time slot to suit their schedule they change delivery slot or day even to suit themselves not others in the neighbourhood.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby basingstoke123 » 11 Jan 2019, 2:15pm

DHL - Drop it, Hide it, Loose it. But I was told that by someone who had a temporary job as a multi-drop driver with competitor Omega (as it was then). That was before the days of smart phones and Google Maps, so drivers had to know the delivery area well.

Distribution and delivery is not as easy as it seems. Even experts can get it completely wrong, as DHL did last year. It's one thing to loose a pizza, or new smart phone, a couple of computers, an entire lorry load of goods. But DHL ended up loosing a significant part of a brand new contract! https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... age-fiasco

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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby reohn2 » 11 Jan 2019, 5:44pm

mjr wrote:
reohn2 wrote:They're providing a service and out to make a profit.

Offer customers a discount but making it smaller than the cost saving of nearby drops should make more profit.

I doubt it,customers become familiar with a supermarket or supplier's site and when ordering weekly shopping to the tune of upwards of £100,a couple of quid here or there won't lure them away IMO,however not delivering on time to suit them would be a killer.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby mjr » 11 Jan 2019, 5:53pm

I think you've still not understood. It ain't about luring anyone away. It's about luring flexible customers into picking times that cut costs and pollutions, while still allowing the others to pick the times they want.
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby reohn2 » 11 Jan 2019, 6:31pm

mjr wrote:I think you've still not understood. It ain't about luring anyone away. It's about luring flexible customers into picking times that cut costs and pollutions, while still allowing the others to pick the times they want.

And I don't think you understand that people only want their groceries delivered when it suits them,not when it suits their neighbours or to fit in with a supermarket's runs list.No use delivering groceries when people are at work :?
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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby mjr » 11 Jan 2019, 7:30pm

reohn2 wrote:
mjr wrote:I think you've still not understood. It ain't about luring anyone away. It's about luring flexible customers into picking times that cut costs and pollutions, while still allowing the others to pick the times they want.

And I don't think you understand that people only want their groceries delivered when it suits them,not when it suits their neighbours or to fit in with a supermarket's runs list.No use delivering groceries when people are at work :?

I understand that. Nothing would change for them. But I'm pretty sure there's also lots of people who don't really care whether their delivery is at 10am or noon and would gladly help the retailer save fuel and pollution in return for 25p maybe, but at the moment there's no way to do it - every daytime slot is £1, every evening and weekend £2.

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Re: Trucks Do Not Have Cyclist-Obscuring Blind Spots

Postby reohn2 » 11 Jan 2019, 7:39pm

I'll leave it at that,we disagree 'nough said.
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