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Re: Cycle Facility of the Month?

Posted: 13 Jan 2020, 7:42pm
by mjr
pwa wrote:
MikeF wrote:...... Also it's only on one side of the road.

Yes, that is something that bothers me about cycle facilities sometimes, having to cross the road to get to them.[...]

Since 2016, UK highways departments can use the Dutch solution: two parallel give-way markings across the road to connect a cycle lane on the left with an side cycleway on the right, clearly showing that motorists should give way. Like this but with wider lines. :)

I've yet to see one installed. :(

Re: Cycle Facility of the Month?

Posted: 14 Jan 2020, 11:01pm
by RickH
mjr wrote:
pwa wrote:
MikeF wrote:...... Also it's only on one side of the road.

Yes, that is something that bothers me about cycle facilities sometimes, having to cross the road to get to them.[...]

Since 2016, UK highways departments can use the Dutch solution: two parallel give-way markings across the road to connect a cycle lane on the left with an side cycleway on the right, clearly showing that motorists should give way. Like this but with wider lines. :)

I've yet to see one installed. :(

The nearest thing I've seen to date is this crossing alongside a zebra (that is also new) in Bolton where a railway line path crosses the road (The bridge where the railway went below the road no longer exists & hasn't done for quite a few years).

2019
Plodder Lane crossing.JPG
Plodder Lane crossing 2019 (click to enlarge)

2017
Plodder Lane crossing 2017.JPG
Plodder Lane crossing 2017 (click to enlarge)

Re: Cycle Facility of the Month?

Posted: 16 Jan 2020, 12:00pm
by Pete Owens
mjr wrote:
pwa wrote:Since 2016, UK highways departments can use the Dutch solution: two parallel give-way markings across the road to connect a cycle lane on the left with an side cycleway on the right, clearly showing that motorists should give way. Like this

It looks like some intellectually challenged Dutch highway engineer has missed the irony in the facility of the month captions and thought they were examples of good practice to be followed, and has taken inspiration from:
http://wcc.crankfoot.xyz/facility-of-the-month/April2009.htm
Note the white triangles painted on the Dutch cycleway clearly show that motorists have priority.

Re: Cycle Facility of the Month?

Posted: 16 Jan 2020, 12:33pm
by mjr
Pete Owens wrote:
mjr wrote:Since 2016, UK highways departments can use the Dutch solution: two parallel give-way markings across the road to connect a cycle lane on the left with an side cycleway on the right, clearly showing that motorists should give way. Like this

It looks like some intellectually challenged Dutch highway engineer has missed the irony in the facility of the month captions and thought they were examples of good practice to be followed, and has taken inspiration from:
http://wcc.crankfoot.xyz/facility-of-the-month/April2009.htm
Note the white triangles painted on the Dutch cycleway clearly show that motorists have priority.

Curious. I don't think it should under the usual rules (that carriageway is a village access road, not a major road) and I don't think it did when I rode it (after the Streetview image) but I've not checked the video. It's also not quite what was being discussed because they ride on the right, of course. So here's another nearby two examples without give-way markings: https://showmystreet.com/#u8nh9_3ju19_1p.b_-ke43 https://showmystreet.com/#uarni_3gjne_7r.b_-jh43 and there are plenty more.

As to the Humber Bridge Country Park example, I think what's wrong with it are the sharp angle of the turn, the lack of legal force in the cross-carriageway give-way marking back then and that it's apparently-needlessly been put right smack on top of a T-junction, but I'm not surprised if you listed it simply because it directs cyclists towards a cycleway because I think you dislike that and would rather everyone had to ride the A15 dual carriageway approach to the bridge with all the trucks.

I've seen the zebra-side crossings before (we've at least two locally) and I've also seen priority crossings of roads using only give-way markings. What I've not seen is UK diagonal access markings yet.