Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Andy Tallis

Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Postby Andy Tallis » 15 Oct 2005, 10:03pm

Before riding an audax (long distance cyling event) one must sign up to safety regulations for riding on the road etc. Why can the DVLA not introduce a similar system for driving licenses. Before a license was given the individual would be required to sign a document stating that he had read the highway code and would stiove to obey it at all times, respect all road traffic laws and the rights of all road users to a safe, enjoyable and comfortable journey. The costs would be minimal amd it would give drivers no excuse for commiting offences. No more "I was only 5 mph over the limit, I wasn't doing anything wrong."
Anyone got any thoughts on this?
Perhaps the CTC could campaign for such a policy.

gar

Re:Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Postby gar » 16 Oct 2005, 1:12pm

Make a collapsible bike statutory luggage in all cars and make them cycle home if they offend motor traffic law.

Andy Tallis

Re:Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Postby Andy Tallis » 16 Oct 2005, 1:30pm

And the police car (ideally a 4 wheel drive) could follow an inch from their back wheel, revving and beeping.

GreenArrow

Re:Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Postby GreenArrow » 16 Oct 2005, 6:05pm

There's too many incentives to NOT obey the law...

Today I've ehard a trailer on BBC Radio 4 for File on 4 on Tuesday night at 8pm, it's about what's happening with lorry drivers (hours driving etc.), sounds like it could be rather edifying.

How many companies monitor the hours their employees drive for work I wonder? Or give them incentives to disobey the law (speeding, expecting them to always answer the mobile phone etc.)?

Signing up to the law is part of it; so is recognising every time you get in a gar/lorry/van to drive that you have a responsibility to other road users, and that if you're tired or otherwise incapable you shouldn't be out there.

Finally, the law is governed by what is palatable tothe masses and therefore only recognises those distractions like mobile phones; what about the parent distracted by kids on the schools run? If you want to see how driving without distraction, go take a look at the rules for train drivers/signallers, they ain't even allowed a radio...

B

Re:Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Postby B » 19 Oct 2005, 2:08pm

This sounds as if it would be unnecessary - all road users are expected to adhere to the Highway Code in any case - and you should whether you sign a document before an Audax or not.

Not only that but I think cyclists are the biggest transgressors of the Code in any case. Now that the nights are drawing in I estimate two-thirds of all cyclists I see are breaking the law. When riding into York on two occasions in the past week I reckon that of about approximately 100 cycling adults more than 60 were riding without lights, only one light and/or on the pavement.

Andy Tallis

Re:Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Postby Andy Tallis » 19 Oct 2005, 8:54pm

I am fully against the contravention of lighting laws (except the pathetic technicalities like pedal reflectors and the out of date BS. I go by what works, including advice from drivers.) However, if you were to stand at the edge of a motorway how many cars would be doing over 70?

B

Re:Why don't drivers have to sign up to the law?

Postby B » 21 Oct 2005, 10:51am

I wouldn't dispute that the Code is transgressed all the time by all sections of the road-using public from pedestrians to motorway drivers but we all do it.

I just think it would be a bit rich to say that drivers ought to sign a docket to say they will drive safely when:

1. They are bound by the Code anyway
2. Why not pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, HGV drivers, tractor drivers....... you get the point

And finally I have to say that in twenty years of driving (not taking into account motorcycling and cycling) the closest I have come to a really nasty accident was when a cyclist, with no looking, signalling and warning cut in front of me. He was very nearly dead meat and it was so close I was shaking afterwards. Perhaps nobody should be allowed out cycling till they have passed a cycling proficiency test?