Accidents

CJ

Re:Accidents

Postby CJ » 9 Nov 2005, 2:46pm

A related thought:

It's often said, at any rate we often claim, that the health benefits of cycling exceed the risks by a factor of 20. But this must include some rather sweeping assumptions about the amount of cycling done.

Logically, a law of diminishing returns must apply to the health-giving benefits of cycling; since the effect of riding, say, one more mile a day is obviously greatest for those who currently take no exercise at all. At the opposite extreme I believe it has been said that competing in a Tour de France takes a year off your life, and it certainly seems that few professional racers make old bones. Be that as it may, it's obvious (to anyone who's tried) that the fitter one becomes, the harder it is to make any further improvement!

On the traffic danger front, there's no disputing that exposure to traffic hazards is in simple proportion to the mileage or time spent cycling. This may be offset by "practice makes perfect" and there is evidence that more experienced and frequent cyclists are less likely to end up in hospital. However this must also be subject to a law of diminishing returns. I don't think riding 500 miles a week is likely to make one ten times better at avoiding accidents than someone who does "only" 50. And on the other hand, high mileage riders seem to be more inclined to use somewhat busier roads.

It follows that there must be an optimum level of cycling – a weekly mileage beyond which any further gain in fitness is smaller than the increased exposure to risk. I have no way of knowing how many miles that is of course, but I'd guess it's something between those two aforementioned numbers.

Anyone got a better idea?

Andy Tallis

Re:Accidents

Postby Andy Tallis » 9 Nov 2005, 6:28pm

I've thought about that one too. Not sure where it is (probably between 50-200 miles a week) but there is an optimum level. There's also an optimum level for really living life fully - what you enjoy (50 - a heck of a lot of miles a week.)

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 10 Nov 2005, 2:16pm

Anyone got a better idea?

living life fully - what you enjoy

Yes the real value is the amount of cardio vacular exercice that you get.

My theory is that the greatest pleasure is to be had from getting excellent cardiovascular exercise....... throughly deep breathing and panting for say 45minutes every day

distance is not relevant..... difficulty is.

Cave men were made to work hard but lived till they were 45 on average.
In this country we are living till we are 78 on average but your quality of life is not good unlss you get that cricial heart exercice that i have mentioned.

If you don't get it thing go wrong.

You could play squash or do aerobics, but you don't get fresh air, sunshine or nature, with either of those cardovascular exrcices, essential ingredients for robust good health

bovlomov

Re:Accidents

Postby bovlomov » 14 Nov 2005, 12:39am

Sorry about this plug....

...but since the BMA sent me a load of their own dodgy stats, I've got some of my own:
http://bovlomov.liquidpurple.com/helmets

The page isn't finished yet, so there might be some teething problems.

bovlomov

Re:Accidents

Postby bovlomov » 14 Nov 2005, 12:41am

...the main one being that I put the wrong link up.

http://bovlomov.liquidpurple.com/helmets.htm

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 14 Nov 2005, 10:12am

.don't give up!

bovlomov.liquidpurple.com/helmets.htm

it does the http://www for you but you can include www.

gar

I'll have a look now.

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 14 Nov 2005, 10:16am

Too true bovmolov Too true!

Future statistics will show that, during the past two decades, fewer people have died from head injuries sustained while travelling by bicycle than have been murdered - or unlawfully killed - by members of the BMA.

And I seriously/permanently injured by them after an (m)bike accident.

I would actually say FRCS rather than BMA
but it would be hairsplitting.

bovlomov

Re:Accidents

Postby bovlomov » 14 Nov 2005, 11:21am

Oh, really?!!

What did they do to you?

Anyway, the BMA haven't responded to my request for details. I think that they are a bit embarrassed by Mr Shipman, but there are some others too - and that's just the ones that came to court.

I'm not really suggesting locking up all doctors. But if they want to exchange one-sided stats, then mine are just as valid as theirs.

Andy Tallis

Re:Accidents

Postby Andy Tallis » 14 Nov 2005, 5:28pm

Fantastic boulmov.
But why does noone mention the blatant and enourmous health risks of smoking?
Do the BMA want to outlaw that?
And what about drinking helmets? A housemate of mine got a headinjury through being too drunk to defend himself against chavs a while ago. He has also got a head injury from cycling though - but what do you expect if you take a French road bike off road and pull the wrong brake on a descent?

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 14 Nov 2005, 6:29pm

There are scales of induced disease by NHS operatives/functionaries.
there is surgeon induced disaes; doctor induced disease, and nurse induced disease, and they all try to outbid each other in the diseases they do induce.

What did they do to you?
I had a closed broken tib and fib which the surgeon said only needed manipulation.
However they wanted by products like bone marrow and haemoglobin and stuff so they inserted a rod down the middle of the bone and not satisfied with that tore a muscle out of the other thigh against my wishes, and being too big for the so called job they wanted the muscle to do it would not fit in; It therefore would not heal as a grafted job... and still has not done so nearly three years later, so they cannot remove the rod because their botched job did not heal... and I told them not to do it and they entirely ignored my wishes.

So I have a non healing broken leg that without any invasive surgery at all would have healed in four or five months, and also NO adductor in the other leg either.Thank you very much.
I have issued a number of writs, but not served proceedings or summons yet.
The surgeons saw me coming and knew me from previous incarnations, one of them from a thousand years ago. It was their clear intention to cripple me and thus far they have.

bovlomov

Re:Accidents

Postby bovlomov » 14 Nov 2005, 7:44pm

Ouch!

But surely none of this would have happened if you'd been wearing a helmet.

Did you see the stats last week? 980,000 adverse incidents at NHS hospitals reported in 2004/2005. I suppose you are lucky not to be among the 34,000 deaths.

If all those peole sue then there won't be enough money to do any more operations.

But it seems that the more senior staff are the least likely to admit to mistakes, and so probably the least likely to learn from them.

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 15 Nov 2005, 7:38am

Until the late 19th century surgeons were itinerant
and frequently did not wait to be paid as they fled from those intent on lynching them for botched ops.
If you mention this to them today they will say
"Oh it just shows you how things have changed!"
In this country perhaps where they hide behind the veil of the NHS.... not so much in the USA where they may have insurance costs and even then do a runner if the damages outweighs the insurance value.

There is still quite an element of "doing a runner"
in the surgeon trade today. I f they do not turn up to a BMA enquiry, you know why.

A great deal of crime passes unnoticed in hospitals done by the surgeons, and considered by them as normal practice.

The Arthritis association for example actually promotes the disease and this provides loads of profits for the pharmaceutical companies, and work for surgeons, and cripples a greta many who would be healed by preventive measures therwise.

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 15 Nov 2005, 6:12pm

Ok Bov!
NONE OF THIS WOULD HAVE HAPPENED IF I HAD BEEN WEARING A HELMET!

Is that ok?

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 15 Nov 2005, 6:15pm

If all those people sue then there won't be enough money to do any more operations.

This is actually a profound thought Bov and to me an effectivce critique of the capitalist(or state capitalist) effect on human health.

gar

Re:Accidents

Postby gar » 15 Nov 2005, 6:18pm

Andy
expect if you take a French road bike off road and pull the wrong brake on a descent?

if it were at the top of a cliff as well you might sprout wings, or would that be too much to hope, like the Bognor pier flyers.

Ouch!