Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Pendodave
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby Pendodave » 26 Jul 2020, 10:41am

thirdcrank wrote:They do say that raising both hands above your head can be a good way to trigger a heart attack. I've known a couple of golfing colleagues of whom it was said "He died doing what he liked doing" but who presumably hadn't been told of the dangers of following through.

Not many of the old boys I see playing manage to get their hands up above their shoulders. More hockey than golf...
In all seriousness, as well as the benefits of a regular 3-4 mile walk, golf requires balance, a modicum of strength and provides a variety of mental stimulae. It also provides social interection that may be harder to maintain for retired folk.

Jdsk
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby Jdsk » 26 Jul 2020, 10:45am

thirdcrank wrote:They do say that raising both hands above your head can be a good way to trigger a heart attack.

Fact Buster
https://www.abc.net.au/health/talkinghealth/factbuster/stories/2012/05/30/3513662.htm

Jonathan

Pendodave
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby Pendodave » 26 Jul 2020, 11:05am

Jdsk wrote:There'a wonderful letter written by Arthur Ashe to his daughters when he knew that he was dying of AIDS. He describes the difference between sports that you do when you're young but usually give up, and those that you keep up for life.

This is something that doesn't really seem to be considered in our football centric sporting environment.
I played football at university and for a large company in the SAL for a few years, but outside these middle class enclaves it's mostly a nasty, slightly violent and not particularly sociable game.
My children play hockey (as well as footy), which has a far higher carry through into the adult game, right through to vets. It's not good for the back though... Many other sports offer better through-life opportunities for participation than the ones foisted upon the young.
Ultimately though, exercise involves raising up from the sofa, and something about entropy (i think) makes this quite a tough thing to do...
Oh, more reading on golf : https://www.randa.org/en/theranda/initiatives/golfandhealth

Cyril Haearn
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby Cyril Haearn » 26 Jul 2020, 11:15am

.. 'even spectating at golf events is good for one's health'

I guess one has to walk quite a bit between holes
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thirdcrank
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby thirdcrank » 26 Jul 2020, 11:18am

Cycling and walking are both activities where the exercise is incidental. Cycling can be better in terms of the distance that a reasonably fit rider can cover in a reasonable time. I've always tried to travel under what the YHA used to call "under your own steam." I can't think of many (any?) other activities which are a utility physical activity in themselves, but can also be undertaken as a leisure pursuit or organised sport.

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Graham
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby Graham » 26 Jul 2020, 11:39am

I agree TC ( of course ).

The trend in "normal living" over the decades has been to remove physical activity from daily life.

The monstrous "elephant-in-the room" is (perceived) need to move around in 1+tonne metal boxes to achieve normal living functions.
Everyone now plans their lives expecting to travel around a lot, using motorised transport.
This has certain interesting consequences . . . :wink:

Cycling for TRANSPORT elegantly integrates some beneficial physical effort into daily life without having to find significant additional time to do an additional activity.

However, we are up against a whole system that is invested in perpetuating the status quo. . . . .. deeper on down :oops:

PaulaT
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby PaulaT » 26 Jul 2020, 11:53am

Well it's a promising noise. More people on bikes is always going to be a good thing. Whether it delivers anything of lasting value only time will tell.

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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby reohn2 » 26 Jul 2020, 12:06pm

Graham wrote:
......Cycling for TRANSPORT elegantly integrates some beneficial physical effort into daily life without having to find significant additional time to do an additional activity.
However, we are up against a whole system that is invested in perpetuating the status quo. . . . .. deeper on down :oops

Therein lies the problem,ask any non cycling car driver why they don't cycle for transport and the first thing out of their mouth will be "the roads are too dangerous".
We've built a society around the car and now the tail wags the dog in so many ways people are suffering greatly as a result.
Until the car's excesses are reined in and cycling given a fair and proper place and funding progress will only ever be small.

:
-----------------------------------------------------------
I cycle therefore I am.

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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby slowster » 26 Jul 2020, 12:30pm

thirdcrank wrote:I can't think of many (any?) other activities which are a utility physical activity in themselves, but can also be undertaken as a leisure pursuit or organised sport.

Running, i.e. what you do when you need to get somewhere when you're late.

Graham wrote:The monstrous "elephant-in-the room" is (perceived) need to move around in 1+tonne metal boxes to achieve normal living functions. Everyone now plans their lives expecting to travel around a lot, using motorised transport.

I think there is a more insidious and even more deeply embedded underlying cause, which is housing and planning. As a society we have made it attractive for people to live too far from workplaces, schools and shops to cycle or - better still - walk to them. This has been largely due to unintended consequences, e.g. designating areas for housing and industry development that are completely separate and too far apart for people to walk to work.

The quality and price of housing is another major factor. We have encouraged excessive social stratification, with too many people moving further away from where they work because the housing close by is of poor quality or in an undesirable area. More recently high transaction costs have made it increasingly expensive to move when changing employment: rather than pay the stamp duty or the rental fees/deposit to move closer to work, it's cheaper just to drive further to the new workplace (and safer if the employment might not last, e.g. freelance/contracting/zero hours contracts). Workforce mobility is important for the economy, but our tax system and social policies discourage it.

The underlying problem may not be transport policy and infrastructure, but housing and planning policy. If people are able and can afford to live close to their workplaces, schools, shops and community facilities, they are more likely to walk and cycle. Such a change on a large scale would create its own momentum: more people will start walking and cycling if others around them are doing it, and that in turn will result in better conditions for people walking and cycling (both public, e.g. road infrastructure, and private, e.g. bike storage). Whether the huge increase in car ownership and miles driven over the last 50 years is the cause of this or has only enabled it, is beside the point.

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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby thirdcrank » 26 Jul 2020, 12:54pm

Even within the NHS, there's mixed-up thinking. Although I only drive as a last resort, I've never enjoyed walking as a leisure activity ie for it's own sake. I need a purpose. I routinely walk for every stage of getting repeat prescriptions ie once to the surgery to submit the request, a second time to collect the prescription and then to collect it from the pharmacy. (This has recently been affected by lockdown, but that's not my point.) Instead of walking across the road from the surgery to the nearby pharmacy, I walk to one a bit further away, generally to Drighlington which at my slow pace is about a couple of hours round trip. I do the same for my wife's prescriptions and ditto for my mother when she was still living at home. There are posters in the pharmacy urging people to take more exercise and at one point there was one for a scheme that would get you from couch potato to fun runner in a few weeks. BUT, the pharmacist took a lot of telling that I did not want him to order my prescriptions online and then deliver them. "Whenever I go to the doctors, they tell me I need more exercise. Your driver gets enough driving practice." (BTW, I know that because he regularly delivers to many of my neighbours.)

==========================================
slowster

I don't think it is beside the point to say that transport policy has played a huge role. In Morley, it's still possible to see how people lived when most walked to work, usually at the mill. There are big detached houses for the bosses and a spectrum of a few semi's then terraces, reducing in size. Most have no more than a tiny garden, so everything is compact. These houses survive because they are generally built of stone, the millowners who owned them having assumed that the Yorkshire textile industry will last for a thousand years. The leafy nature of this particular suburb is caused by the public park behind the camera position here.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.74121 ... 312!8i6656

I'd say that much of the apparent prosperity of our society has depended on a thriving motor trade.

AlexGK
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby AlexGK » 26 Jul 2020, 12:56pm

I hope he thinks bout the fact that there are hardly any bike racks outside shops etc. This is something that really needs to be addressed.

thirdcrank
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby thirdcrank » 26 Jul 2020, 1:56pm

We are not too short of municipal bike racks around here, although we could always do with more. In the decade or so when traffic was a county function, (1974 - 1985) West Yorkshire installed a fair few sheffield stands, then Leeds City Council installed a lot more. Some never get used, even directly outside shops.

To declare an interest, I'm a strong supporter of sheffield stands, to the extent that I have one on my drive.

Jdsk
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby Jdsk » 26 Jul 2020, 2:05pm

slowster wrote:I think there is a more insidious and even more deeply embedded underlying cause, which is housing and planning. As a society we have made it attractive for people to live too far from workplaces, schools and shops to cycle or - better still - walk to them. This has been largely due to unintended consequences, e.g. designating areas for housing and industry development that are completely separate and too far apart for people to walk to work.

The quality and price of housing is another major factor. We have encouraged excessive social stratification, with too many people moving further away from where they work because the housing close by is of poor quality or in an undesirable area. More recently high transaction costs have made it increasingly expensive to move when changing employment: rather than pay the stamp duty or the rental fees/deposit to move closer to work, it's cheaper just to drive further to the new workplace (and safer if the employment might not last, e.g. freelance/contracting/zero hours contracts). Workforce mobility is important for the economy, but our tax system and social policies discourage it.

The underlying problem may not be transport policy and infrastructure, but housing and planning policy. If people are able and can afford to live close to their workplaces, schools, shops and community facilities, they are more likely to walk and cycle. Such a change on a large scale would create its own momentum: more people will start walking and cycling if others around them are doing it, and that in turn will result in better conditions for people walking and cycling (both public, e.g. road infrastructure, and private, e.g. bike storage). Whether the huge increase in car ownership and miles driven over the last 50 years is the cause of this or has only enabled it, is beside the point.

Yes, very important and strongly interactive with health and transport policy and quality of life.

But there's an enormous lag for housing policy to have much effect.

And we might be about to see how serious the Government is about changing anything...

Jonathan

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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby Cyril Haearn » 26 Jul 2020, 2:31pm

Back then industry was dirty but people had to live near it
Now many industries are clean, people could live nearby
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Re: Coronavirus: GPs to prescribe cycling in new obesity strategy [BBC News]

Postby merseymouth » 26 Jul 2020, 5:28pm

Hi all, A couple of points (1) I used to play golf, medallist with the UB40 Golf Society. But whilst out cycling I got almost wiped out by a Bin lorry, SMIDSY! Outcome shattered clavicle and impacted shoulder joint. The shoulder functions like a totally shot bottom-bracket unit :twisted: . So no more golf for me.
(2) Used to be a Harrier, 1 hour for 10 miles, 1h 14min for 1/2 marathon, so could easily speed up for a late appointment. Then came rather extensive internal surgery, stroke, brain tumour et al, so no more running!
Still I had my 5 tricycles, but after all of the above my expectations exceeded my ability. SWMBO got worrd that my energy store would desert me whilst awheel, so I put a Bafang Motor on my No1 trike.
Well it weighed a ton, needed my undivided attention or the auto shut-off would cut in, usually when needed most :( .
Upshot? I took the ruddy motor & half ton of battery off, reverted to total leg power which = enjoyment restored :D .
More smile than grimaces appear on my face, nirvana.
What is really needed to make cycling more acceptable for newbies? Well a proper understanding of your common or garden pedal cycle, leading to proper use of variable gears!Check out the level of ignorance, yes they know Shimano, but not how to use such equipment. How mny times do us addicts have to rescue the ignorant from their folly??? TTFN MM