Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Jonty

Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby Jonty » 24 Sep 2009, 8:01pm

There seems to be widespread concern, which I share, about the lack of provision for cycle parking at shops, schools, new flatted development, hospitals, universities, employment locations, railway stations, airports and other developments.
Even when parking is provided it is often poorly planned, in the wrong location and uses inappropriate stands with the result that it isn't used as much as it should be, if at all.
This subject need to be taken much more seriously. As a retired Town Planner, I suggest that the Government be requested to produce a Planning Policy Guidance Note on Best Practice for Cycle Parking.
Among other things, this would give guidance - for different types of development including new and existing development - on the appropriate scale of provision, the principles which should guide where cycle parking should be located within developments, and the most appropriate stands.
It would also give guidance to Local Planning Authorities on what they should seek to be provided by developers seeking planning permission.
Examples of best practice including examples from abroad and what to avoid would be indicated.
A list of planning consultants with established cycle parking expertise could be attached as an Appendix.
The CTC and other cycling interests would be consulted and fully involved in the drafting of the Guidance.
Eventually I would like to see cycling parking standards enforced for all types of development similar to the provision which has traditionally been made for cars.
As cycling increases in popularity car parking can be reduced and where appropriate made over to cycle parking.
jonty


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bovlomov
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby bovlomov » 24 Sep 2009, 9:47pm

In objecting to planning applications for flats, I often draw attention to the absence of bicycle parking and 'dirty storage' facilities(for bicycles, prams, tools etc). Many of the applications have been refused, but I don't recall those concerns ever being listed in the reasons for refusal - even though 'dirty storage' and cycle parking are explicit requirements of the UDP.

It seems that planning officers and members of the planning committee need to be reminded constantly of their own policies.

Storage of all kinds is a problem in modern developments, as housebuilders obviously don't think it is a particular selling point. Opposite my house there is an application for flats. Tiny rooms, but even the one bedroom flat has an en suite shower/wc. In the absence of any other space, that'll be the cycle storage/ tool cupboard.

They wouldn't stand for that anywhere else in Europe.

cjchambers
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby cjchambers » 24 Sep 2009, 10:55pm

One thing which annoys me, and which could be improved with very little effort, is the lack of signage for cycle parking. On entering a town, there are always plenty of signs directing drivers to car parks and even telling them how many spaces are left. It's quite rare, however, to see cycle parking signposted at all. When arriving in a new town or at a station, it shouldn't be necessary to wander around looking for somewhere to park!

When it comes to parking for flats, I'm probably a case in point. I live in a first floor flat - I have two large car parking spaces with my house number painted on them, but when I go out on my bike, I have to lug it up a flight of stairs! I'm relatively young and fit so I don't mind too much - I also live alone and so I don't mind sharing my living room with a bike. However, these are things which would put off all but the most dedicated cyclist. The general utility cyclist just wants to get going with a minimum of fuss, and if tackling a flight of stairs is involved, he or she will probably just take the car.

This place was built in the 1970s where the car was seen as an unquestionable and unstoppable force for good - I would have hoped modern developments would be better, but from what I've seen, it seems not. You probably know a lot more about the planning process than I do, but if there was a way to force standards on new development, it can only be a good thing.

emleyman
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby emleyman » 25 Sep 2009, 9:08am

I'm not sure about planning guidance, but over the last couple of years the DfT has produced some good guidance for designers. Both the Manual For Streets and Local Transport Note 2 - Cycle Infrastructure Design cover the provision of cycle parking in town centres and residential areas.

www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/roads/tpm/ltnotes/ltn208.pdf
www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/sustainable/manforst ... treets.pdf

The Manual For Streets in particular has some good guidance on providing for cyclists including the opening sentence of the section on Cycling "Cyclists should generally be accommodated on the carriageway." I don't like the gradual expansion of 'off road cycle lanes' that are unrideable at speed, and dangerous to pedestrians and cyclists but serve to convince drivers that cyclists should be off the carriageway.

I think the issue is not so much the lack of guidance, but convincing the "old school" designers who were brought up as highway engineers and convinced by safety auditors that segregation was key, that there is a better way.

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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby thirdcrank » 25 Sep 2009, 9:32am

IMO a big rart of the problem is that if you specify x cycle stands for y potential users, "designers" then plump for the cheapest solution which can cram most into the smallest space - butterflies. The Ministry of Transport's own research (it's in one of the TALs quoted above) demonstrates that cyclists will not use butterflies, except to chain a bike up. The regulations should specify that a butterfly and similar cannot be regarded as a cycle stand. (They are not much better than their hopefully extinct predecessor, the slotted concrete block.)

It's just one more example of measuring inputs, rather than outputs.

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essexman
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby essexman » 25 Sep 2009, 9:44am

Check out cambridge cycling campaign parking guidance as well. Like a lot of cambridge cycling campaign material its well thought out and presented and targeted at town planners.


http://www.camcycle.org.uk/resources/cy ... ing/guide/


Co-incidently my market town Saffron Walden has just got its first central bike racks (all 2 of them). They are well used on market days. The town council has decided to pull them out as they are obstructive (but basically cos the county council put them in), its caused a little roar of protest from local cyclists who are used to being utterly ignored in any provision. To suddenly have something and then to have it pulled away from us is harsh.
I hate snow.

FatBat
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby FatBat » 25 Sep 2009, 1:48pm

cjchambers wrote:One thing which annoys me, and which could be improved with very little effort, is the lack of signage for cycle parking. On entering a town, there are always plenty of signs directing drivers to car parks and even telling them how many spaces are left. It's quite rare, however, to see cycle parking signposted at all. When arriving in a new town or at a station, it shouldn't be necessary to wander around looking for somewhere to park!

Here in Leeds, a lot of the cycling parking stands are located in the pedestrianised shopping streets i.e. the only streets in the city centre (bar the Inner Ring Road) that you're not allowed to cycle on. This might make perfect sense to someone, but I don't understand it.

FatBat
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby FatBat » 25 Sep 2009, 1:53pm

There is a relatively new scheme called Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) - http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/wales/government/en/1115314116927.html and http://www.trada.co.uk/downloads/cb_code_for_sustainable_homes.pdf- whereby new homes are given a sustainability rating which can then be used is marketing material to show how lovely and green the home is. Secure cycle parking is one place where CSH points can be gained. So, maybe developers who want to get good CSH ratings for their rabbit hutches might start providing something useful. Then again ....

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Tigerbiten
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby Tigerbiten » 25 Sep 2009, 2:50pm

If you think bike parking is bad then try riding something very non-standard.
I ride a recumbent trike and pull a trailer with it.
The whole combo is around 3' wide and 9' long.
If I park it in a row of cambridge stand I take up 2 or 4 bike spaces, depending if I need to fold the trailer back towards the trikes front wheels.

Sometimes if there's something to lock it to, I'll just park it in a car space in a normal car park.
I can arrange it to take up most of the bay.

Luck ........... :D

Speshact
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby Speshact » 27 Sep 2009, 10:20pm

http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/publicat ... design.jsp
also worth a look re cycle provision for homes

Flinders
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby Flinders » 28 Sep 2009, 10:40am

What sort of racks are best for recumbents?

I'm presently grumbling about butterfly type racks at my local surgery, but don't want to suggest something that wouldn't 'do' for everyone...........
I prefer the butch staple type, as my bike is small and however tall a staple one is I can lock to it somewhere. Some fancy ones you can't use the verticals as they're too thick, but only the top bar, which would leave my bike hanging by the crossbar. Are the plain staple ones okay for recumbents?

thirdcrank
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby thirdcrank » 28 Sep 2009, 4:24pm

I'd recommend a sheffield stand with a cross tube about a foot from the ground. This is the style currently being installed by Leeds City Council. The advantage is that you have the main sheffield stand, which - if placed with suitable clearance - will take two bikes, one on each side, and the lower tube offers a supplementary locking position.

================================================================

FatBat wrote:... Here in Leeds, a lot of the cycling parking stands are located in the pedestrianised shopping streets i.e. the only streets in the city centre (bar the Inner Ring Road) that you're not allowed to cycle on. This might make perfect sense to someone, but I don't understand it.


This is because of the way local govt operates. Functionaries concentrate entirely on "inputs" ie what has been spent on what:- X number of sheffield stands x miles of cycle lanes and it wouldn't matter if they were all down a coal mine. They have been provided. They certainly don't like being judged on "outputs" ie what has been achieved in implemntation of a policy. Oh, no. That might mean doing something. Under this system the dinosaurs from the years of 'Leeds - Motorway City of the '70s ' can shake their heads wisely and say, "We did warn you that promoting cycling was a waste of money."

Flinders
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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby Flinders » 28 Sep 2009, 4:56pm

Thanks, I'll remembr that about the extra tube- and mention it to OH who is following up a similar thing about bike stands in his workplace development plan.

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Re: Planning Policy Guidance on Cycle Parking

Postby basingstoke123 » 29 Sep 2009, 12:36am

Cycle parking and cycle racks - how hard can it be? The problem is that most people who specify and install cycle racks have never tried locking a cycle to one. What's obvious to you and me, isn't to them. And they assume that reputable suppliers would only sell cycle racks that were fit for purpose.

I find it very frustrating to see numerous examples of useless cycle racks. Often, it's not a case of something having been done on the cheap - just done with no understanding. Good intentions are not enough. Even Sheffield Stands can be installed so that they cannot be used.

The latest example I have found is Wicks in Basingstoke. Two new, covered sets of cycle racks. They look expensive. Unfortunately, one of them has the utterly useless slots for a wheel. OK, except for mountain bikes or road bikes, and you don't actually want to lock you bike securely. The other one has Sheffield Stands. Great! Well, should be great. Problem is, the stands abut the wall panel, which rather limits their usability. Bad installation has converted excellent stands into scarp metal. (I did speak to the manager, and was told that they were aware of problems).