Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

CYCLOHEAD

Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby CYCLOHEAD » 29 Sep 2004, 5:43pm

The average lifespan was 40 now it is 80 and set to lengthen considerably for those who can afford it.The typical cyclist will race up to 35 then relax and run to fat.Most of the icon cyclists of the 70' and 80's are noe corpulent armchair addicts.But is does this have to be our fate?

I was out training and out of courtesy refrained from overtaking a vet hanging on to hiswheel which was just as well as I got dropped.

Lance Armstrongs autobiography cites vets like Italys Cappuchi who achieve deent times.With age performance dropsbut with cyclists who continue training it is not that marked.

Maybe we need more prizes and vet categories in major races to provide incentives for older cyclists to continue bearing in mind that we are all headed in that direction and it would be brilliant if we could enjoy competitive cycling to a ripe old age which we can't now because of a youth culture that extends to all sports.

Bearing in mind that 60% of the worlds pop will be over 60 in not so long in te future big companies need to look at marketing and the good health of senior citizens.With major races it would be ggod to have 3 age groups competing moving of the podium at different stages fitting in with a philosophy of extending cycling far and wide.

Maybe CTC needs a senior citizens forum board so they can continue to enjoy and take part in that beautiful sight racing cycles splayed in a peloton with vivid colours of racing jerseys bobbing in and out in harmony

Jon

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby Jon » 30 Sep 2004, 10:00am

If you just regard cycling as a competitive sport, from which you have to 'retire' when you are no longer competitive, then you will have the problem of 'going to seed' after you stop. It's the same with any actitity that's practiced merely as a sport.

Some of us regard cycling as part of our lifestyles, and as such have integrated it into our lives rather than having it as a tacked on sporting activity. I cycle every day - as part of my atempt to live a more sustainable lifestyle - mainly as transport for work and leisure, and as part of my 'car-free' ethic. I intend to continue to do so whatever age I am as long as I physically can. While people continue to regard cycling as something that can only be done as a sport, by the young and fit, then we will continue to get nowhere in attempting to promote sustainable transport alternatives.

661-Pete

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby 661-Pete » 30 Sep 2004, 6:09pm

I agree that a 'seniors' section might not be a bad idea - and aimed at those who're keeping it up, not just those retiring from racing! I'm 54 which qualifies me for U3A, Saga and all that lot, but as a cyclist I don't really want to be called a 'vet'! I've never done anything competitive in my life, by the way (see my post on the "speaking up for CTC" thread). But there may be handy tips that us older ones might want to share - like watching out for the old ticker playing up, for instance!

661-Pete

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby 661-Pete » 1 Oct 2004, 8:53am

Seems my previous posting was very timely, seeing as it was just before the news came out about our Nation's Glorious Leader's 'ticker' trouble! Perhaps Our Tony (also a 50-plus) should take up cycling as well as or instead of, possibly the gym workouts he apparently does already. Or would that be too much for the 'security' guys?

CYCLOHEAD

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby CYCLOHEAD » 1 Oct 2004, 4:59pm

A few more messages likes Pete might sway things in getting this board implemented however old you are.My Dad was in fine form mentally and physically up to 84 then he gave up his main sport when things rapidly went downhill.Help keep the seniors healthy and opt for a board

trikster

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby trikster » 2 Oct 2004, 7:43pm

although a CTC member i no longer ride with a D.A. fed up with the go faster brigade. a group of us have set up a new group for those who enjoy a leisurley cycle ride, our oldest member is 86 and my husband and i are the babies of the group at 56. But our last Sunday's ride saw us do 65 miles and not a problem for anyone. Some od our older could give the youngsters a run for their money. we have also had 2 new members join us at the age of 65 so there are plenty youn oaps out there who will cotrinue cycling for years to come and i am rpud to ride with them

trikster

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby trikster » 2 Oct 2004, 7:47pm

oop's my fingers missed a few letters then sorry about that my arthritic hands playing silly devils. hope you can understand my previous message with all its mistakes

Guy

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby Guy » 13 Oct 2004, 4:00pm

I find this very strange. Why would anyone believe that the oldies would prefer to have a seperate forum? Would we then get the intolerant prats saying "you can't post on here - you're over 50" and stuff like that? I've seen similar happen on other message boards. Anyway, what would you describe as old? I heard a bloke in his forties tell my Dad he used to ride a bike until he got too old for it. My Dad is 77 and still going strong! He doesn't think he's old, so why should you?

J Cantrell

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby J Cantrell » 15 Oct 2004, 12:34am

As an 'older' cyclist I must repond - I don't need "incentives for older cyclists" thankyou cyclohead and Jon as far as I am concerned "cycling is part of our lifestyle" is not for me either, and even 'trickster' who arouses some sympathy worries me when they say "I am proud to ride with them" - it sounds a bit condescending (tho I'm sure its not meant to be), surely whatever your age, you cycle (or do whatever) because you enjoy it - is there some other reason for sport/activity?

trikster

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby trikster » 18 Oct 2004, 9:57pm

no! you are quite right i didn't mean to sound condescending. Because the people i mentioned are not only cycling companions but are also dear friends. by the way we also have two 14 year old lads who cycle with us reguarly and we all get on really well. Age is irelevant to us.

gar

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby gar » 22 May 2005, 9:36am

I met a cyclist of 97 on his bike on his own while I was touring Glasgow city streets a few years back.

A shopkeeper verified that he was indeed 97 and passed that way at the same time every day like
clockwork.

gar.

gerry

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby gerry » 22 May 2005, 12:57pm

Orienteering is one sport that caters for all ages, and both sexes- larger events have age classes eg M6, M20, M60 (and W6 etc), so that each competitor competes against people roughly their own age, on a course of appropriate length and difficulty. It can get bizarre- I ran in an event which had an M80 course for the one entrant who was over 80. He decided to run the M70 course which had two over 70 entrants.

Stilly

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby Stilly » 22 Sep 2005, 8:51am

As I am coming up to the big 40 and have only got back into cycling over the last year due to numerous Rugby injuries keeping me off my bike. I have lost two and a half stone and I cycle to work twice a week and cycle every other day of the week(about 100 - 150 miles per week). I have made cycling part of my lifestyle and it is having benefits I hope to carry on for as long as possible as I have some goals that I have set for myself and these include LEJoG, the Etape, Mount Ventoux to name but 3. My Grandad was 92 when he died and he cycled every day, so I feel age is no barrier as long as the will is there.

Stilly

PS. Some of the older riders on the Challenge ride left me and my brother in law riding in their wake.

Pinky

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby Pinky » 25 Sep 2005, 1:24am

Now in my 69th year ( ie I am 68) I cycled to Spain last year with a total of 4895 miles as the years total milage. This year I went down (and back up) the danube from its source to Budapest ( about 2800 kms in a leisurely 49 days in a tent!) and I have covered 3500 miles in all so far this year.
My car has done less than 2000 miles in the last 12 months!
I cycle daily and while a ctc memeber I do not belong to the local DAA ( whatever that means). I cycle alone, mainly on road, & try and cycle 20 miles every day but it usually works out at about 110 miles per week on average.
Started cycling again 2 years ago after an adult lifetime gap. Very glad to be living life again and I enjoy my trusty velo.
Next year I am planning to cycle from the source of the Loire in the Massif Centrale to the Altlantic Ocean at St Nazaire.

Despite mad motorists and even mad, blind and deaf pedestrians I am glad to be a cyclist and intend to keep going for a few more years yet. Got to do the North Sea cycle route in 2007 around my 7Oth birthday
Trevor A Panther
In South Yorkshire,
England

gar

Re:Campaign of the Elders Gerontology and cycles

Postby gar » 25 Sep 2005, 8:47am

Well if you want to carry on to a great age on your machines this handcranked recumbent trike will carry you well beyond your sell to the knacker by date.

Many oldies in their 80s look very enviously at its potential for them, but it really would take too much to learn to ride it at that age.
www.garethhowell.net/cleancycle.jpg

Many people lose either their sense of balance or
good use of their legs by that age, and a recumbent, low, trike is what most of them have BUT without being self propelled, ie they are in a wheel chair or with big walking sticks.

I would be house or car bound without it at the age of 60, as it is I ride the lanes and the bridleways same as anybody else.