Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Pilotlight

Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby Pilotlight » 30 Jun 2005, 9:43pm

Did anyone see BBC 6pm news tonight with the 20 second report on new figures of road deaths. Overall deaths are down but cyclists deaths have increased by 20%!!!!!!!!!!!!.

Sorry this is all that was quoted.

Fortunately the 5 minute report that Prince Charles earn £11m last year is good news. I was worried that we may have to pay more than the 4 pence each (quoted) to keep him in civc duties (£15m).

Who puts these news reports together??

Some 3,500 people lost their lives on the roads on the UK last year. But thank God the Royals are giving us value for money.

Comments please

pwward

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby pwward » 30 Jun 2005, 10:25pm

Not really sure what to make of this. Just a few extra deaths can make a big % diferrence as the numbers are small. Also this info is pretty meaningless without knowing if exposure (ie. the amount of cycling) has changed.

Pilotlight

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby Pilotlight » 30 Jun 2005, 10:57pm

here is the address for the stats

http://www.dft.gov.uk/stellent/groups/d ... 038554.pdf

deaths up by 114 to 134 (18%)

Any death or injury is bad.

I just found it so banal howit was reported on the news.

gar

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby gar » 1 Jul 2005, 9:18am

Don't you mean up FROM 114 to 134 ....18% ?
Yes you do!

g

Pilotlight

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby Pilotlight » 1 Jul 2005, 3:23pm

Yeh sorry about that.

Point is it should not be UP!

Strange how these figures come out on the same day as the BMA statement???

BMA??Ivory Towers, Ivory Towers.

Lescycles

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby Lescycles » 2 Jul 2005, 11:34am

this accident data is being taken out of context: what happened at the same time especially to the volume of cycling? the figures for 2003 showed a rise in cycling km for the first time since 1981/2: the increase in cycling 2002/3 was ~25% and yet the KSI figure fell.
2003 was very warm and dry, whereas last year was more normal.
there may be other things going on too: which more expert analysts will no doubt dig up in due course
meanwhile the main point is: the cycle traffic data has not come out for 2004 yet so we cannot say whether the 18% increase is relatively good, bad or indifferent.

Lescycles

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby Lescycles » 2 Jul 2005, 3:55pm

as to the media response, might draw attention to the 82% (yes, eighty two percent) increase in bus/coach deaths 2003/4. the increase was 'only' 9 actual deaths and the total tends to fluctuate between 11 and 19 each year - so a single incident can produce a huge percentage impact.
with cycling the situation is not dissimilar - at a somewhat lower level (about 10X the total deaths compared to bus/coach)
all the more reason to keep the context in view and look at longer term trends - with cycling the trend in deaths tends downwards and if useage is upwards, as we hope, and try to achieve - dont believe everything you read in the papers!

gar

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby gar » 3 Jul 2005, 7:23am

So a 25% increase in cycling miles
BUT only an increase in 20 cycling deaths?
That makes me rather uneasy even so.

Has he got the on road cycling miles for the two years and how are they calculated? One presumes there were no deaths from off
roading.

Thanking Lescycles for the illustrative info.

gar

haggard_rider

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby haggard_rider » 15 Jul 2005, 2:22am

I'm new to this forum - but my expereience may add to the debate. I've recently started cycling again after a potentially fatal cycling accident in 2003. Though the incident was caused principally by a car driver, the severity of the injury sustained was directly related to the speed at which I was travelling.
On the road might is right - there isn't anyone who hasn't been cut up by bigger or faster vehicles and as a (London) cyclist one has to learn to accept hazardous encounters of one kind or another as the price payable each day for the freedom to ride to work and back.
It is not only vigillance, prudent road sense, sober judgement and a properly maintained bicycle, though necessary, that are the real factors of our insurance policy against death on the road, but that as a community of cyclists with a sense of a shared, progressive purpose and with an aim of mutual safety for all road users we might observe that the statistics cited are sufficiently anomolous to warrant further investigation.

TJ

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby TJ » 6 Sep 2005, 4:49pm

The maximum speed a bicycle can achieve is governed only by the person riding it.
Years ago, while still at school(and I do mean years ago!), I used to ride my bikes without a clue about tyre pressure/rolling resistance/friction and aerodynamics. These factors will obviously affect the efficiency of said riders speed, but put a stronger fitter rider on it, and it will go faster.
From your posts Roadrunner/tyredoctor, I'd say you haven't much of a clue yourself.
You may be well intentioned, but you do talk some rubbish sometimes.

Happiness

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby Happiness » 6 Sep 2005, 7:37pm

Now now! Tj.

Tony

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby Tony » 8 Sep 2005, 9:32am

An mtb with 700C wheels?

nuttycyclist

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby nuttycyclist » 8 Sep 2005, 2:42pm

"An mtb with 700C wheels? "

It made oi larf as well :-D

I can understand t'other way round, after all I'm building one myself that'll have 26" in a road frame (hub brakes before you ask). But 700C on MTB? Do you have to remove the fork crown?

gar

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby gar » 11 Sep 2005, 4:14am

Are cyclist deaths on road classified any place by type of road "A" "B" "C" etc ???

Then if most occured on "A" roads my contention for no "A" road use by push bikes would be
arguable.

B

Re:Cyclist deaths up by 20%

Postby B » 12 Sep 2005, 4:23pm

Is gar serious about not using 'A' roads? This would mean I could not cycle to my local town, even the longer 'small roads' route involves two limited stretches on the 'A' road.

Furthermore more deaths on 'A' roads wouldn't necessarily mean they were more dangerous if more miles were clocked up on them. It is often quoted that motorways are the safest roads in Britain in terms of miles travelled per person injured killed.