Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Pedalling Pete

Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby Pedalling Pete » 1 Jul 2005, 2:50pm

Respect to CTC Director, Kevin Mayne, for his Breakfast TV appearance to resond to BMA's bad health proposals.

To suggest that a respected body, such as the BMA, might be wrong is clearly going to appear barmy to the Media. To suggest that compulsory helmet wearing by cyclists might be bad for health demands acceptance of a counter-intuitive argument; and the Media and Politicians don't do "counter-intuitive"!

Kevin might as well have tried to persuade dim-wit Fiona, (don't we all love her!), that the earth is round - when it's clear to everyone who has eyes to see that the earth is flat!

Respect, Kevin!

Pilotlight

Re:Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby Pilotlight » 1 Jul 2005, 3:17pm

Missed it pete

one watches the Beeb and Natasha.

it's good to see the CTC and kevin getting some airtime.

yet road injuriesand deaths have more to do with speeding and bad driving, I guess?

ronh

Re:Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby ronh » 14 Jul 2005, 6:57pm

Hats off to Kevin. Not sure about this. If poorly supported compulsory helmet use will dissuade people from cycling, what does extensive use by our officers and general membership do. I suggest that many of our members and other cyclists continuing to wear this discredited accesssory, and commonly being pictured with them on, may be doing far more to give out a message that cycling is a hazardous pursuit or mode of travel. Thus, so many must be put off entirely.
RH

Pedalling Pete

Re:Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby Pedalling Pete » 16 Jul 2005, 6:46am

The General Medical Council has accepted that the evidence of Professor Sir Roy Meadow, the world-renowned paediatrician and "expert witness", was wrong. As a consequence his name was struck off the medical register.

The GMC panel said that his interpretation of statistics may have "seriously undermined the authority of doctors giving expert evidence." Quite so! Professor Meadow was stating his opinion, despite the contrary evidence of the facts.

That raises the question as to whether those responsible for the BMA's revised position on helmet use by cyclists will be subject to similar scrutiny.

Or will the BMA be allowed to get away with publishing their opinions, despite the contrary evidence of the facts?

gar

Re:Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby gar » 17 Jul 2005, 7:06pm

And nobody wins from legal proceedings except
lawyers and child murderers. Women do have rights.

I have great faith in the national sickness service
NSS for short, so don't you say anything against
physicians either Peddling . They will get you back to sickness if they can, if you go near.

g

gar

Re:Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby gar » 17 Jul 2005, 7:17pm

One person may die every ten million miles from NOT wearing a helmet so EVERYBODY must always wear a helmet. Is that it?

Surgeons and physicians are not keen on two wheels and usually play tennis and Squash.
It is safer, and they see victims of unsafe sports.

"Cyclist injuries requiring orthopaedic surgery are much rarer than Motorbike ones but usually more serious.... can be quite bad"
my own orthopaedic consultant says, and only ever plays squash, which is when he told me 30 years ago that I would break my leg riding a push bike.
I did not and have had 30 years joy from cycling
AND continue to do so WITH a broken leg, My
non healing broken leg is, needless to say,
surgeon induced... a 20% factor in such ops.

gar

Pedalling Pete

Re:Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby Pedalling Pete » 21 Jul 2005, 7:51am

More Media Nonsense:
On today's GMTV an item referred to reasons children won't wear helmets. It then illustrated the importance of the issue quoting the number of children involved in cycling accidents annually.

If they had been covering hospital-acquired MRSA, would they have quoted the number of people dying in hospitals annually?

Can no one stop this tide of misinformation being dispensed by the media?

gar

Re:Hats off to Kevin Mayne

Postby gar » 22 Jul 2005, 7:38am

I am told MRSA ia a surgeon's disease.
ie very convenient as a management tool in hospitals, again induced by them for whatever purpose.
I still have an infection three years later which I have analysed as "epidermis" of the same variety.
The trouble with the National Sickness Service (NHS) is that it is a very vigorous and expanding business. If you are in the least bit critical they tell you what you can do drop dead! If you are polite and uncomplaining about poor service they kill you off more slowly,
knowing they have got you in their clutches.

It amazes me how much power Surgeons have when their precursors in the business were itinerant tradesmen* who had to run for their own liveswithout pay if their operation was not successful and hope that they would do a little better in the next village. Still with the global villages mentality, the number struck off suggests that they do the same today but in slightly different context, move to another nation state where they are not known for their wickedness.


Keep well clear and take care, but not so much care that you fall over your own feet, and break a bone.

*OU History of Medicine credit course

g