Newer bikes are slower.

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kgw2511
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Joined: 29 Mar 2020, 9:21pm
Location: Runcorn

Newer bikes are slower.

Post by kgw2511 »

Since my return to cycling last year I have mostly used my 1989 Orbit which has 52/42 chainring and 13/23 cassette (six sprockets).

Last summer I bought a second hand Boardman which I think is about 10 years old and has a compact chainring and 12/25 cassette (ten sprockets).

Today I rode a new Ribble which has a compact chainring and 11/30 cassette (eleven sprockets). I also had a bike fit before today's outing.

Frustratingly I am slower on the newer bikes than the Orbit by about 1.5kph. Of the 61 Strava segments on today's ride I only obtained one personal best.

I believe I am making the same effort on all three bikes.

Anyone know why that may be?

Thanks
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Paulatic
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Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by Paulatic »

Isn’t all that chainring and cassette size irrelevant? Surely what’s changed is the bike fit? Did it change your position by much?
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mattsccm
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Joined: 28 Nov 2009, 9:44pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by mattsccm »

Easy. You are not peddaling as hard/fast :D
Do it all with a computer showing pulse, cadence watts if you can then see what happens.
Actually I bet you just go better on a bike you know. :D
PDQ Mobile
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Joined: 2 Aug 2015, 4:40pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by PDQ Mobile »

Brand new is easy to explain.
Bearings and drivevtrain are still tight and not "run in".
A well used and maintained machine will always run freer.
kgw2511
Posts: 17
Joined: 29 Mar 2020, 9:21pm
Location: Runcorn

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by kgw2511 »

mattsccm wrote: 19 Sep 2021, 8:33pm Easy. You are not peddaling as hard/fast :D
Do it all with a computer showing pulse, cadence watts if you can then see what happens.
Actually I bet you just go better on a bike you know. :D
I use all of those :D
pwa
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Joined: 2 Oct 2011, 8:55pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by pwa »

Check all the basics. Brakes rubbing when you are climbing? Hubs spinning freely? Light, fast smooth tyres? Sitting okay on the bike? If all those are as they should be, it could just be your current level of fitness isn't quite what it was, or you are feeling the effects of age. I once spent a lot on building up a new and better bike, only to fail to break my personal best on a 300k Audax ride. The bike was lovely but my fitness had dropped.
mattsccm
Posts: 4066
Joined: 28 Nov 2009, 9:44pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by mattsccm »

"I use all of those :D"
Sorry , I took "believe " to mean your recording was subjective no number based.
Tried using identical tyres, tubes etc to give a "standard"?
I am assuming your tests are all on the same day on the same road etc.
cyclop
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Joined: 3 Oct 2013, 7:49am
Location: Dumfriesshire

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by cyclop »

Ditch strava!
Syd
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Joined: 23 Sep 2018, 2:27pm

Newer bikes are slower.

Post by Syd »

There are loads of variables that come into play from how you feel on the day, road conditions , tyre type and pressures, to weather conditions, including wind, temperature and air pressure, that all come into play and are almost certainly different to when you set PB’s on a particular segment.

Some of by PB’s, close to home, are still from the last few miles of the first 200k ride. I guess I’d warmed up!
simonhill
Posts: 3825
Joined: 13 Jan 2007, 11:28am
Location: Essex

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by simonhill »

Maybe a bit of (not aware of) nervousness or reticence because you are on a new bike. Was it your bike or borrowed?

Do it ten times more and see how you get on.

Finally, the only real question, did you enjoy the ride?
rareposter
Posts: 340
Joined: 27 Aug 2014, 2:40pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by rareposter »

PDQ Mobile wrote: 19 Sep 2021, 8:38pm Brand new is easy to explain.
Bearings and drivevtrain are still tight and not "run in".
A well used and maintained machine will always run freer.
Tiny incremental percentages far too small to feel, possibly but otherwise total rubbish. Unless the bearings are actually binding or they've disintegrated into their own rust, a newer drivetrain should be far more efficient.

OP: As to why it's "slower" - you've given the gear ratios with the insinuation that the compact chainset might be to blame but what else is different? Tyres, tyre pressure, position on the bike, weather conditions on the circuit you've ridden, your own fitness? Or simmply getting used to the new bike?
VinceLedge
Posts: 206
Joined: 12 Dec 2020, 9:51am

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by VinceLedge »

Really hard to genuinely tell if one bike is faster than another, surely? Every ride, even on the same route will be different , with your power output being different, weather conditions etc.
Only way I can see is multiple rides on the same route with the different bikes at full effort and compare the average (with power comparisons if you have a power meter).
mumbojumbo
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Joined: 1 Aug 2018, 8:18pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by mumbojumbo »

Many factors influence speed,and unless all factors remain constant,from one bike to another,you cannot derive useful conclusions from your time records.Does it really matter-if speed matters go electric?
Postboxer
Posts: 1857
Joined: 24 Jul 2013, 5:19pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by Postboxer »

Maybe a slightly different position meaning more drag, though I agree one ride isn't enough to draw a conclusion from.
peetee
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Joined: 4 May 2010, 10:20pm
Location: Upon a lumpy, scarred granite massif.

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by peetee »

My guess is the bike fit has put you in a position that is less than ideal for the range of movements your muscles are used to.
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