Newer bikes are slower.

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mig
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Joined: 19 Oct 2011, 9:39pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by mig »

peetee wrote: 21 Sep 2021, 7:29am My guess is the bike fit has put you in a position that is less than ideal for the range of movements your muscles are used to.
this!
peetee
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Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by peetee »

peetee wrote: 21 Sep 2021, 7:29am My guess is the bike fit has put you in a position that is less than ideal for the range of movements your muscles are used to.
Expanding on this, saying you have returned to cycling and are using your old bike suggests to me that either;
A) that bike was never at the optimum for best efficiency but your muscle memory tells you it’s right and you feel comfortable riding it.
B) If you have aged appreciably in the time you have not been riding, familiarity of that bike has been enough of a persuading factor for you to adapt your physique to compensate for its less than ideal position.
If either of these fit your situation then the bikefit set-up will take some adjusting to, even if it isn’t so far out as to feel uncomfortable.
It’s also worth noting that not all bike fits are the same - the science behind this discipline is not consistent or universally agreed upon.
Bowedw
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Joined: 22 Feb 2011, 10:26pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by Bowedw »

I personally would suggest that the compact chainset is not delivering the exact ratio that you are at your best with for most of the road conditions on the ride. Presumably it's a 34/50 or 52. Living in a hilly area the 42 was often swapped for a 38 or 39 which gave a good spinning ration and most rides where done using that ring. A 34 or 36 is to low and the move to the larger ring gives ratios that are a bit high for the average cyclist, neither is the chainline at is best using the outer front and nearer to the inner on the rear.
I use a triple which allows me to have the middle at the 39 a larger outer ring for tailwinds and a inner 26 for those hills that used to be managed on the 39. It was also very noticeable with the older chaiset combination that the 14 tooth rear was the one I would wear out first, I have numerous ones as proof. These days I don't do enough miles to be able to say.
drossall
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Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by drossall »

Syd wrote: 20 Sep 2021, 7:34am There are loads of variables that come into play from how you feel on the day, road conditions , tyre type and pressures, to weather conditions, including wind, temperature and air pressure, that all come into play and are almost certainly different to when you set PB’s on a particular segment.

Some of by PB’s, close to home, are still from the last few miles of the first 200k ride. I guess I’d warmed up! Image
This I think. I'm certainly conscious of days when I'm feeling stronger (relative term!) than others, especially now I'm an older rider. And, almost by definition, your PBs are the best of all your rides on that bike on those sections. Whereas you're comparing with a single day on the new bike.

Not sure it's always about the bike :D
simonhill wrote: 20 Sep 2021, 8:01amFinally, the only real question, did you enjoy the ride?
And this +100.
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Paulatic
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Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by Paulatic »

My strongest days always have a tailwind. :D
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basingstoke123
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Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by basingstoke123 »

Paulatic wrote: 22 Sep 2021, 10:06am My strongest days always have a tailwind. :D
I'm even better down hill.

I had an Orbit for many years. Upgraded it to a triple chain ring - forget now the ratios. It lasted many years and many miles (OK - the frame lasted many years).
ChrisP100
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Joined: 24 Sep 2020, 9:00am

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by ChrisP100 »

kgw2511 wrote: 19 Sep 2021, 6:11pm Since my return to cycling last year I have mostly used my 1989 Orbit which has 52/42 chainring and 13/23 cassette (six sprockets).

Last summer I bought a second hand Boardman which I think is about 10 years old and has a compact chainring and 12/25 cassette (ten sprockets).

Today I rode a new Ribble which has a compact chainring and 11/30 cassette (eleven sprockets). I also had a bike fit before today's outing.

Frustratingly I am slower on the newer bikes than the Orbit by about 1.5kph. Of the 61 Strava segments on today's ride I only obtained one personal best.

I believe I am making the same effort on all three bikes.

Anyone know why that may be?

Thanks
Weather/road conditions?

I was noticeably slower on my commute today than I was yesterday, but this morning I had a headwind of 18mph (gusting 32mph) :wink:
Marcus Aurelius
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Joined: 1 Feb 2018, 10:20am

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by Marcus Aurelius »

Look at your normalized power for given conditions, and terrain on each bike. Then look what that equates to in terms of speed. I’d be amazed if the newer bike is slower.
mumbojumbo
Posts: 900
Joined: 1 Aug 2018, 8:18pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by mumbojumbo »

Depends-could be a butcher's machine.
David2504
Posts: 31
Joined: 11 Mar 2021, 5:29pm

Re: Newer bikes are slower.

Post by David2504 »

Maybe, just maybe it’s because you are growing older
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