dozey pedestrians

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fastpedaller
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dozey pedestrians

Postby fastpedaller » 19 May 2019, 7:30pm

Came up behind a couple on a country road (single track), I was doing about 15mph. Assessed situation and kept in RH gutter, as I went past the guy, (who was on the right of his female companion) chose that exact moment to take a 90 degree turn and 'leap' (no other way to describe it) to the side. I shouted and braked, he froze and thankfully a collision was avoided. I stopped and he immediately said "you don't have a bell" so I explained that shouting whilst braking was a lot more effective, and that if I'd reached for a bell instead of braking that we would surely have collided. He again said "where's your bell" so I pointed out that pedestrians don't hear the bell on my other bike, and I'm often verbally abused if I use it anyway. I said "well fortunately nobody was hurt, but could you please look before crossing" so his response was "but it's a country lane" to which of course I said "yes, it isn't a footpath, so you need to expect other traffic" Fell on deaf ears I expect.

brynpoeth
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby brynpoeth » 19 May 2019, 7:37pm

One should always use a bell in good time, assume the PoF is deaf, be ready to stop
Walking is so relaxing :wink:

Generally best not to try to 'educate' them, but I often doff my cap in greeting
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The utility cyclist
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby The utility cyclist » 19 May 2019, 7:43pm

I agree with some of what you say with regards to a bell but 15mph on a single track with two pedestrians ahead is way, way too fast, you should slow to half that given the circumstances, give an audible warning of your intention/coming from behind. If they don't acknowledge prepare for worst case as they might be hard of hearing/deaf or even mentally diminished, if it were two children would you have ridden at such a fast speed?

No point shouting as the event unfolds, it's too late by then, the shout likely did nothing and was that they saw you at the last second as this reaction is quicker than an audible warning at that juncture.
Basically you got lucky, you are the person overtaking, it is entirely on you to make sure that it is safe to do so and to account for unexpected actions particularly in such a narrow space, what if one of them had stumbled or was avoiding a pothole? If you want that from a motorist whilst overtaking you on a bike then you should offer same to others.

Speeding impatient cyclist should be the subject title IMO

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mjr
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby mjr » 19 May 2019, 7:44pm

Treat walkers as wildlife until they show signs of sentience!

Position your bell so you can ring and brake. Ring as a greeting on approach, not only when a collision is likely.
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Graham
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby Graham » 19 May 2019, 8:11pm

People make mistakes. "they" make mistakes AND you make mistakes. That is a universal truth that should inform your actions in future.

Cycling up behind pedestrians is potentially a high-risk situation, because they will very likely be listening out for the approach of motor-vehicles and will thus be unable to detect your approach.

Once suddenly aware of an approaching bicycle, walkers often do unexpected panic manoeuvres ( which make things worse ).
The classic is the "cross over to the other side", to join the other person - BUT both executing this at exactly the same moment.

Always attempt to make a noise to warn of your approach ( ? an operatic flourish ? )
Look for signs that they have become aware. . . . . some give no feedback at all . . . some haven't heard . . . .
Always slow to a speed where you can safely stop . . . in case something goes wrong.

A big smile : fullsome thank-you(s) : safe passage for all.

^ This is also essential for passing horse riders and dog owners with dogs off the lead.

Mike Sales
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby Mike Sales » 19 May 2019, 8:23pm

On a Sunday ride in Gwynedd I came up behind a group of elderly men blocking the path and walking away from me. By their black suits I supposed they were walking home from chapel. Luckily I remembered two of my very few words of Welsh.

Esgusodwch fi (Excuse me.)

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The utility cyclist
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby The utility cyclist » 19 May 2019, 8:47pm

Graham wrote:People make mistakes. "they" make mistakes AND you make mistakes. That is a universal truth that should inform your actions in future.

Cycling up behind pedestrians is potentially a high-risk situation, because they will very likely be listening out for the approach of motor-vehicles and will thus be unable to detect your approach.

Once suddenly aware of an approaching bicycle, walkers often do unexpected panic manoeuvres ( which make things worse ).
The classic is the "cross over to the other side", to join the other person - BUT both executing this at exactly the same moment.

Always attempt to make a noise to warn of your approach ( ? an operatic flourish ? )
Look for signs that they have become aware. . . . . some give no feedback at all . . . some haven't heard . . . .
Always slow to a speed where you can safely stop . . . in case something goes wrong.

A big smile : fullsome thank-you(s) : safe passage for all.

^ This is also essential for passing horse riders and dog owners with dogs off the lead.


But they aren't unexpected, they are really entirely predictable and hence why we (should) account for them. These things happen relatively frequently, we know it can and does happen and people talk about it often, just like we can predict the actions of children near roads etc. people on foot do things that people on foot do.
Walking down a very quiet narrow lane, you see a bird/butterfly in a bush you turn to look and all of a sudden a speeding cyclist is right in front of you screaming/shouting at you making out it's your fault, I know how I would feel!

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The utility cyclist
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby The utility cyclist » 19 May 2019, 8:51pm

Mike Sales wrote:On a Sunday ride in Gwynedd I came up behind a group of elderly men blocking the path and walking away from me. By their black suits I supposed they were walking home from chapel. Luckily I remembered two of my very few words of Welsh.

Esgusodwch fi (Excuse me.)

you mean walking down the path right, your language/use of the word "blocking" comes across very negatively, as if they were doing it purposely, it's no different to 'in the middle of the road' is it.

reohn2
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby reohn2 » 19 May 2019, 8:56pm

I think the thing to remember is that pedestrians have every right to be as dozey as they like,and we as cyclists are the ones with the speed and inertia in our charge.
Which means that until we are aware that they are aware of us,and as sure as we can be that it's safe to pass them.
Therefore we should kill the speed and make them aware of our presence before we pass them we shouldn't.
I find with that approach,99% of the people I meet makes for pleasant encounters,of course I get the odd one who's determined to be grumpy but that's people :)
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Lance Dopestrong
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby Lance Dopestrong » 19 May 2019, 8:58pm

Why try and reason with an idiot? They only use their experience to beat you down to their level. Ignore the twit and carry on with your ride. It was a painful conversation which you didn't need to have and which got you precisely nowhere, so why bother?
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Mike Sales
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby Mike Sales » 19 May 2019, 9:00pm

The utility cyclist wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:On a Sunday ride in Gwynedd I came up behind a group of elderly men blocking the path and walking away from me. By their black suits I supposed they were walking home from chapel. Luckily I remembered two of my very few words of Welsh.

Esgusodwch fi (Excuse me.)

you mean walking down the path right, your language/use of the word "blocking" comes across very negatively, as if they were doing it purposely, it's no different to 'in the middle of the road' is it.


There is no need to react like that, no blame was implied. I only meant that there was no way past, and I had to either ride on at two or three miles an hour, which is the speed I was doing when I spoke, or ask, politely in their probable preferred language, that they let me through.
They were taking up the whole width, what word would you prefer I used to convey this|?

fastpedaller
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby fastpedaller » 19 May 2019, 9:40pm

Advice noted, I wonder if it is a 'Norfolk thing' as if I ride along the front at Wells-Next-The-Sea (even at 10mph) the pedestrians are trying to throw themselves under my wheels (despite my bell ringing or singing). Last time I was there I was about to overtake a (probably 20 something) cyclist, and as I approached (only about 10mph) she was doing about 5mph, I said 'coming past' but she promptly turned right. When I am on my bike or walking in the road I look before I change direction, maybe this is unusual?

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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby MikeF » 19 May 2019, 11:44pm

A ding of a bell in good time eg 10 seconds warning might have entirely prevented that incident. :wink: I think the pedestrian was right in some respects.
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tim-b
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby tim-b » 20 May 2019, 5:34am

Hi
No blame implied, but I give a hearty "Good Morning" when approaching peds and horse riders from behind (I don't have a bell) and slow down until I get a reaction, especially if they have a dog with them :|
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pwa
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Re: dozey pedestrians

Postby pwa » 20 May 2019, 6:19am

One of the first things your parents and teachers are meant to train you to do at about the age of four is cross a road safely. Stop, look, listen and all that. Basic stuff. I once had a bloke walk out into the road immediately in front of me and i yelled something like "Whoaah!" and braked. Between us we avoided a collision but he said "Where's your bell?", and I immediately snapped back "Where's your bloody eyes?". We all make daft mistakes but trying to offload the blame is pathetic.