Bells on bikes

Commuting, Day rides, Audax, Incidents, etc.
Mike Sales
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Mike Sales » 30 Aug 2019, 8:36pm

PH wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
mjr wrote:and later claim not to shout, which means getting pretty close to be heard over the motorists.


Where is this hellish route, so close a continuous stream of heavy, thunderous traffic?

No one said hellish and I doubt it's the one mjr was thinking of, but this one is around 200 meters from where I sit and I use it just about every day
https://www.google.com/maps/@52.891983, ... 312!8i6656

I'll use a bell first, followed by voice when closer and of course stop if needed. People will react in different ways, some will appreciate my efforts to let them know I'm there, others not.


I'm afraid hellish was my description. It seems to me that, if, even when shouting, one has to be pretty close to be heard, the noise of the traffic must be an infernal din, without lulls.
I would avoid such a route, if at all possible.

ANTONISH
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby ANTONISH » 10 Sep 2019, 8:59am

"Bicycles aren't much better.
A walk along the canal path between Bradford-on Avon and Bath was ruined on the bank holiday weekend by a tidal wave of cyclists aggressively ringing at us pedestrians to get the hell out of the way. Though one kind soul did make a stab at basic politeness by shouting out a jolly "good morning" instead of employing his bell. " :?
Extract from Sathnam Sanghera's column in the Times on Sat 7th Sept.
The whole thing was about car horns sounding angry.

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mjr
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby mjr » 10 Sep 2019, 9:19am

ANTONISH wrote:"Bicycles aren't much better.
A walk along the canal path between Bradford-on Avon and Bath was ruined on the bank holiday weekend by a tidal wave of cyclists aggressively ringing at us pedestrians to get the hell out of the way. Though one kind soul did make a stab at basic politeness by shouting out a jolly "good morning" instead of employing his bell. " :?
Extract from Sathnam Sanghera's column in the Times on Sat 7th Sept.
The whole thing was about car horns sounding angry.

I wonder if it really was agressive ringing or simply the "two tings" the waterways authority used to advocate? I think many such complainants are projecting their own emotions or behaviours onto others (if they were riding or driving, they would use the bell or horn as an eff off) and it would not be unusual for a Times columnist to be angry...
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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Audax67
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Audax67 » 10 Sep 2019, 9:39am

Reminds me of one "UAF Audax-style" (i.e. in a pack) event that I rode years ago. The organizing idiots had routed us via a shared canal tow-path, normally limited to 20 kph. I distinctly remember seeing 36 kph on the counter. Pedestrians had no trouble realizing we were coming, though - the entire pack was bellowing somewhat coarse French songs.
Have we got time for another cuppa?

drossall
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby drossall » 10 Sep 2019, 9:48am

mjr wrote:I wonder if it really was agressive ringing or simply the "two tings" the waterways authority used to advocate? I think many such complainants are projecting their own emotions or behaviours onto others (if they were riding or driving, they would use the bell or horn as an eff off) and it would not be unusual for a Times columnist to be angry...

That's what I meant about preferring not to use a bell. Though, contrary to what I said before, the one place where it is good is canal bridges, where typically you can't see what's coming the other way till you're under the bridge, and the towpath may be quite narrow. In that instance, you're probably going slowly and so not really worried so much about pedestrians (there'll be time to stop) as about cyclists coming the other way.

mercalia
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby mercalia » 10 Sep 2019, 10:27am

I finally put a bell on my bike. glad I did, saves the puff shouting out :wink:

mattheus
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby mattheus » 10 Sep 2019, 10:42am

mjr wrote:I wonder if it really was agressive ringing or simply the "two tings" the waterways authority used to advocate? I think many such complainants are projecting their own emotions or behaviours onto others (if they were riding or driving, they would use the bell or horn as an eff off) and it would not be unusual for a Times columnist to be angry...


... is the key phrase.

MOARspeed
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby MOARspeed » 11 Sep 2019, 8:39am

I have bell which rings cut constantly, like the sort you see on a cat collar (only bigger), I found that a regular bell used to get an aggressive response as often as a non-aggressive one. The bell I have was something I did a few years ago, I understand now that a similar thing is now available in bike shops.

Mike Sales
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Mike Sales » 11 Sep 2019, 8:49am

MOARspeed wrote:I have bell which rings cut constantly, like the sort you see on a cat collar (only bigger),


I think that would get to annoy me quite quickly.

MOARspeed
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby MOARspeed » 12 Sep 2019, 6:20am

Mike Sales wrote:
MOARspeed wrote:I have bell which rings cut constantly, like the sort you see on a cat collar (only bigger),


I think that would get to annoy me quite quickly.


Actually don't notice it after a while, besides it can be "turned off".

Carlton green
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Carlton green » 12 Sep 2019, 7:55am

I’ve read much but not all of this thread and wondered whether the purpose of a bell rather than its application has been discussed? To me it’s an audible device that is used to draw attention to one’s presence - purpose of a bell.

The thread seems to have concentrated on the interaction between cyclist and pedestrian but there are also other ‘shared space’ users to consider too and they vary according to space type and location. Motorists, other cyclists, horse riders and pedestrians all need to be aware of and not surprised by our presence. How we interface with each of those groups and share space in an amiable way is a larger topic, but one of which bell use is a part. Where I live drivers are mostly considerate to each other, but go to one of the bigger cities and no such mutual care seems to exist - you can’t change such things, but you can shift your own behaviour to blend in with what happens locally. The same seems to apply to shared space use by other groups too.

How do you use (or not) your bell to appropriately interact with others from the wider group mentioned above. It’s a simple device but how and what you communication through it is varied and variable.
Last edited by Carlton green on 12 Sep 2019, 8:10am, edited 1 time in total.

broadway
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby broadway » 12 Sep 2019, 8:06am

Carlton green wrote:I’ve read much but not all of this thread and wondered whether the purpose of a bell rather than its application has been discussed. To me it’s an audible device that is used to draw attention to one’s presence. The thread seems to have concentrated on the interaction between cyclist and pedestrian but there are also other ‘shared space’ users to consider to and they vary according to space type and location. Motorists, other cyclists, horse riders and pedestrians all need to be aware or rather not surprised by our presence. How we interface with each of those groups and share space in an amiable way is something else. Where I live drivers are mostly considerate to each other, but go to a big city and no such mutual care seems to exist - you can’t change such things but can only shift your own behaviour to blend in with what happens locally.


Yes I have considered it. Motorists can't hear it unless it was an airzound and a hello is likely to better for a horse and rider followed by a careful pass.

Also ding as much as you want at me and I won't hear it.

Carlton green
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Carlton green » 12 Sep 2019, 8:13am

broadway wrote:
Carlton green wrote:I’ve read much but not all of this thread and wondered whether the purpose of a bell rather than its application has been discussed. To me it’s an audible device that is used to draw attention to one’s presence. The thread seems to have concentrated on the interaction between cyclist and pedestrian but there are also other ‘shared space’ users to consider to and they vary according to space type and location. Motorists, other cyclists, horse riders and pedestrians all need to be aware or rather not surprised by our presence. How we interface with each of those groups and share space in an amiable way is something else. Where I live drivers are mostly considerate to each other, but go to a big city and no such mutual care seems to exist - you can’t change such things but can only shift your own behaviour to blend in with what happens locally.


Yes I have considered it. Motorists can't hear it unless it was an airzound and a hello is likely to better for a horse and rider followed by a careful pass.

Also ding as much as you want at me and I won't hear it.


Maybe you need the airzound too :lol:

Horses and their riders are a bit tricky. By one means or another rider awareness is what one needs to achieve; one way is to briefly ring a bell from a good distance back, it’s important to look to see whether he or she reacts to acknowledge your presence (your warning is given to them to help them safely manage their horse). Beware of startlingly a horse, it’s dangerous and the consequences can easily be disastrous.

Mike Sales
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Mike Sales » 12 Sep 2019, 9:02am

MOARspeed wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
MOARspeed wrote:I have bell which rings cut constantly, like the sort you see on a cat collar (only bigger),


I think that would get to annoy me quite quickly.


Actually don't notice it after a while, besides it can be "turned off".


I think that I would turn it off permanently by leaving it in the shed.
As a pedestrian I would be a bit annoyed too. There is enough noise in this world.

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foxyrider
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby foxyrider » 12 Sep 2019, 8:11pm

Mick F wrote:Riding along a quiet lane. Not flying along, just riding nicely.
Two walkers in front going the same way as me.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I came up behind them and said, "Excuse me please".

They jumped out of their skin!
.......... and one of them said, "I wondered what that ringing noise was!"


I have had this quite a few times and its usually fully kitted out 'experienced' walkers/hikers who are patently being bloody minded as often other members of their party have clearly heard my approach. :shock:
Convention? what's that then?
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