Bells on bikes

Commuting, Day rides, Audax, Incidents, etc.
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mjr
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby mjr » 29 Aug 2019, 2:06pm

The utility cyclist wrote:Well I totally disagree, I've never had any hostile reaction, people are always thankful for being considerate and siply showing a common courtesy, slowing down and actually just talking to someone.

Always? I doubt that. I'd expect at least some of them to be unexpressive, but maybe people where you are are less guarded than typical southerners ;)

As for your use of the word 'sneaking', really, you live in some strange world far different from mine and most others if you think coming up to someone and simply asking them in a polite manner to briefly move aside as you might in a supermarket, as you might in the street, at the leisure centre, at work.

I don't ask people to "move aside". That would be rude, although not quite as rude as saying "move aside, peasant!" ;)

So if yu come up to someone in the street and say excuse me that's 'sneaking' up on them is it :lol:

Yep. That's probably rude in most situations. Get over yourself and wait for there to be space to pass safely and with adequate clearance. Say "excuse me" only if you misjudge it and invade their personal space, or need to make them aware of your presence for some other reason.

As it is I've never had to tap someone on the shoulder, but if the person is stone deaf and there is no obvious space to overtake/get past for any distance (which is extremely rare in itself) then a hand on the shoulder to say excuse me would be the only option left.

The only option? Why not wait? As you say, it's pretty rare.

I can honestly say I've never heard someone state that saying excuse me to a person is sneaking and hostile/insensitive, utterly bonkers! :?

And still you haven't - it's the approaching from behind unannounced and undetected which I say is sneaking up.
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brooksby
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby brooksby » 29 Aug 2019, 2:19pm

pwa wrote:There is an art to alerting folk to your presence without seeming aggressive or starting them. I use the bell when maybe 30 metres away, but not closer than that. And I try to chat to people I pass, making the interaction friendly. I don't get hostile reactions so I think I'm getting it about right.


Exactly. The bell simply warns them you are approaching, in case they didn't hear you otherwise. Ring it far enough away that they'll maybe look around, and notice you, so there's no conflict. Always say 'thank you'.

LollyKat
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby LollyKat » 29 Aug 2019, 3:08pm

You can never get it right all the time, though.

Mick F wrote:Riding along a quiet lane. Not flying along, just riding nicely.
Two walkers in front going the same way as me.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I came up behind them and said, "Excuse me please".

They jumped out of their skin!
.......... and one of them said, "I wondered what that ringing noise was!"


I had a similar experience when riding slowly on a towpath, except that when I said "Excuse me please" one turned round and snarled, "Why don't you ring your **** bell?" To which I replied, "I did - three times!" :roll:

Mike Sales
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Mike Sales » 29 Aug 2019, 3:31pm

LollyKat wrote:You can never get it right all the time, though.

Mick F wrote:Riding along a quiet lane. Not flying along, just riding nicely.
Two walkers in front going the same way as me.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I dinged my bell.
I came up behind them and said, "Excuse me please".

They jumped out of their skin!
.......... and one of them said, "I wondered what that ringing noise was!"


I had a similar experience when riding slowly on a towpath, except that when I said "Excuse me please" one turned round and snarled, "Why don't you ring your **** bell?" To which I replied, "I did - three times!" :roll:


Seems as if a bell is not always the best way of communicating, and that it needs the addition of the spoken word!

John Holiday
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby John Holiday » 29 Aug 2019, 5:48pm

Regarding the comment about a wheel driven bell, whilst touring in The Netherlands a few years ago I visited a local bike shop.
Was surprised to find a box with a wheel driven bell operated by a handlebar trigger.
Even more surprised to see the label still marked in Guilders! Had to add it to my collection.

millimole
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby millimole » 29 Aug 2019, 5:51pm

LollyKat wrote:You can never get it right all the time, though.

I had a similar experience when riding slowly on a towpath, except that when I said "Excuse me please" one turned round and snarled, "Why don't you ring your **** bell?" To which I replied, "I did - three times!" :roll:

Been there, done that.
I've decided you can't win on towpaths


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DaveGos
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby DaveGos » 30 Aug 2019, 12:23pm

I just say "bicycle" in a friendly manner before passing and then thankyou as I pass them , simples

mattheus
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Bells on bikes - the final word

Postby mattheus » 30 Aug 2019, 12:33pm

I saw this on Facebook yesterday (paraphrasing):

I'm giving up on bells:

Older people can't hear the high frequencies, and youngsters all have headphones in.

The only response I'm getting is death stares from startled collies.

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Spinners
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Spinners » 30 Aug 2019, 12:53pm

DaveGos wrote:I just say "bicycle" in a friendly manner before passing and then thankyou as I pass them , simples


You should be ashamed to use such 'sneak and speak' tactics. What's the highest you've made a pedestrian jump?
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Audax67
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Audax67 » 30 Aug 2019, 2:16pm

Mick F wrote:Riding along a quiet lane. Not flying along, just riding nicely.
Two walkers in front going the same way as me.
I dinged my bell.
...


The Alsacien version:

ting
ting
ting
ting
ting
bonjour?
bonjour?
bonjour!!♫
EH HOP ! ! !


Which sounds remarkably like heyup.
Have we got time for another cuppa?

RH20
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby RH20 » 30 Aug 2019, 3:55pm

I have a pinger on my bikes. I always ping my bell when approaching someone walking in the same direction as me. They will usually respond by turning round or raising a hand to indicate they have heard me. However, as I live in a former industrial area I am conscious of the fact that the hearing of the person in front may not be very good (industrial deafness). If I do not receive a reaction I slow down and repeat the ping and give a vocal “ passing on your right/left.
Consideration for other trail users can only give a more positive attitude towards cyclists. I often see cyclists thrashing it for all their worth, slow down enjoy the ride. Ping, vocalise, be polite to all trail users. Always remember slow down when passing, your ride is not worth causing an accident.

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mjr
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby mjr » 30 Aug 2019, 4:26pm

RH20 wrote:I have a pinger on my bikes. I always ping my bell when approaching someone walking in the same direction as me. They will usually respond by turning round or raising a hand to indicate they have heard me. However, as I live in a former industrial area I am conscious of the fact that the hearing of the person in front may not be very good (industrial deafness). If I do not receive a reaction I slow down and repeat the ping and give a vocal “ passing on your right/left.
Consideration for other trail users can only give a more positive attitude towards cyclists. I often see cyclists thrashing it for all their worth, slow down enjoy the ride. Ping, vocalise, be polite to all trail users.

1. Should "bell" really be used for a pinger? They have a much narrower frequency range, fewer harmonies and don't really resonate long, which makes them less widely heard. It's better than nothing (I think I have one on my folding bike because it's small), but not as good as a bell ( https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bell#Noun - "A percussive instrument made of metal or other hard material, typically but not always in the shape of an inverted cup with a flared rim, which resonates when struck.")
2. Does both pinging and vocalising annoy both bellers and no-bell-ites? :lol:

RH20 wrote:Always remember slow down when passing, your ride is not worth causing an accident.

Nonetheless, I agree with this if crap design means you're passing close.
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Mike Sales
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby Mike Sales » 30 Aug 2019, 5:00pm

mjr wrote:1. Should "bell" really be used for a pinger? They have a much narrower frequency range, fewer harmonies and don't really resonate long, which makes them less widely heard. It's better than nothing (I think I have one on my folding bike because it's small), but not as good as a bell ( https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bell#Noun - "A percussive instrument made of metal or other hard material, typically but not always in the shape of an inverted cup with a flared rim, which resonates when struck.")
2. Does both pinging and vocalising annoy both bellers and no-bell-ites? :lol:



Speaking for myself, I have never told anybody that they should not have a bell. I certainly do not want to dictate the type of bell, though I certainly wonder if all bells are equal to the Bellman.
I do not think there are any no-bell-ites, in the sense that they tell others to jettison their bells.
What I reject is the idea that there is only one correct way.
I think that what is important is attitude. We have talked enough about this.

They roused him with muffins—they roused him with ice—
They roused him with mustard and cress—
They roused him with jam and judicious advice—
They set him conundrums to guess.

When at length he sat up and was able to speak,
His sad story he offered to tell;
And the Bellman cried "Silence! Not even a shriek!"
And excitedly tingled his bell.
[/quote]

brynpoeth
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby brynpoeth » 30 Aug 2019, 7:44pm

One can say is so much more with a voice, I am aiming for 130 dB to communicate with moturds through their closed windows
'HAALT! STOP!! APPLY HAANDBRAKE!
Last edited by brynpoeth on 31 Aug 2019, 7:31pm, edited 1 time in total.
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PH
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Re: Bells on bikes

Postby PH » 30 Aug 2019, 8:02pm

Mike Sales wrote:
mjr wrote:and later claim not to shout, which means getting pretty close to be heard over the motorists.


Where is this hellish route, so close a continuous stream of heavy, thunderous traffic?

No one said hellish and I doubt it's the one mjr was thinking of, but this one is around 200 meters from where I sit and I use it just about every day
https://www.google.com/maps/@52.891983, ... 312!8i6656

I'll use a bell first, followed by voice when closer and of course stop if needed. People will react in different ways, some will appreciate my efforts to let them know I'm there, others not.