Wooler as a base for cycling

Commuting, Day rides, Audax, Incidents, etc.
Pebble
Posts: 107
Joined: 7 Jun 2020, 11:59pm

Re: Wooler as a base for cycling

Postby Pebble » 25 Jul 2020, 6:45pm

Nigel wrote:
Pebble wrote:@Nigel @oldJohn - can you place this road?


I think its here, https://www.google.com/maps/@55.5769034 ... 312!8i6656

( it is a regular ride of mine )


The decent riding continues north of the Tweed. It gets busy when the roads drop off into the Lothians. Further west the roads are fewer, and probably hillier, but still good cycling. Biggest downside is the draggy tarmac.

My ride yesterday was up the Ettrick from Selkirk, left at Tushielaws to Roberton, then Ashkirk, back over the ridge to the Ettrick valley before a couple of miles back to Selkirk. I wasn't counting, but could have seen as many cyclists as cars on that loop.


- Nigel

Yes, spot on - there is some great riding in that area, can easily do 20 mile without seeing another vehicle.

The Tushielaws route you mention is a favourite of mine too, park at Ashkirk, over the Woll to EB then round by Tushielaws Alemoor and then back over the single track from Roberton (didn't know it was a Drove road!) Haven't been round there since beginning of lockdown - could be tomorrows ride. Sometimes do it from Ancrum through Hawick to get it above 50 - but with all that ascent its near the edge of what I can do.

I take it by the 'draggy tarmac' you mean some of the coarse worn out road surfaces? was on a hideous bit the other day between BonchestBridge and Chesters, felt as though I needed some new hands wrists and elbows afterwards.

Some lovely tarmac on that high road between Hobkirk and the slit-rig road, also the the dead end into Craik - if only all road surfaces could be so goo.

Nigel
Posts: 224
Joined: 25 Feb 2007, 6:29pm

Re: Wooler as a base for cycling

Postby Nigel » 25 Jul 2020, 11:57pm

Pebble wrote:Yes, spot on - there is some great riding in that area, can easily do 20 mile without seeing another vehicle.

The Tushielaws route you mention is a favourite of mine too, park at Ashkirk, over the Woll to EB then round by Tushielaws Alemoor and then back over the single track from Roberton (didn't know it was a Drove road!) Haven't been round there since beginning of lockdown - could be tomorrows ride. Sometimes do it from Ancrum through Hawick to get it above 50 - but with all that ascent its near the edge of what I can do.

I take it by the 'draggy tarmac' you mean some of the coarse worn out road surfaces? was on a hideous bit the other day between BonchestBridge and Chesters, felt as though I needed some new hands wrists and elbows afterwards.

Some lovely tarmac on that high road between Hobkirk and the slit-rig road, also the the dead end into Craik - if only all road surfaces could be so goo.


The "drove road" is the label of the road from Ashkirk, over Woll, then descending to Ettrick valley; the first part of your route.

Draggy, I mean the grade of chipping used in the formation of the tarmac, resulting in a rough surface. Its a larger grade than used in East Anglia for example, and results in a slower road surface (or more effort for same speed). I agree there are some superb surfaces - they've resurfaced a long bit of the loop we're discussing with money from the forestry extraction work.
And, yes, I've met some truly awful stuff which gets painful.

Looks to be more wind tomorrow, so slow up to Tushielaws, then fast on the return half over the moor with a tailwind up the climb.

- Nigel

Pebble
Posts: 107
Joined: 7 Jun 2020, 11:59pm

Re: Wooler as a base for cycling

Postby Pebble » 27 Jul 2020, 12:21am

Nigel wrote:
Pebble wrote:Yes, spot on - there is some great riding in that area, can easily do 20 mile without seeing another vehicle.

The Tushielaws route you mention is a favourite of mine too, park at Ashkirk, over the Woll to EB then round by Tushielaws Alemoor and then back over the single track from Roberton (didn't know it was a Drove road!) Haven't been round there since beginning of lockdown - could be tomorrows ride. Sometimes do it from Ancrum through Hawick to get it above 50 - but with all that ascent its near the edge of what I can do.

I take it by the 'draggy tarmac' you mean some of the coarse worn out road surfaces? was on a hideous bit the other day between BonchestBridge and Chesters, felt as though I needed some new hands wrists and elbows afterwards.

Some lovely tarmac on that high road between Hobkirk and the slit-rig road, also the the dead end into Craik - if only all road surfaces could be so goo.


The "drove road" is the label of the road from Ashkirk, over Woll, then descending to Ettrick valley; the first part of your route.

Draggy, I mean the grade of chipping used in the formation of the tarmac, resulting in a rough surface. Its a larger grade than used in East Anglia for example, and results in a slower road surface (or more effort for same speed). I agree there are some superb surfaces - they've resurfaced a long bit of the loop we're discussing with money from the forestry extraction work.
And, yes, I've met some truly awful stuff which gets painful.

Looks to be more wind tomorrow, so slow up to Tushielaws, then fast on the return half over the moor with a tailwind up the climb.

- Nigel

did it clockwise to hide from the wind, lucky choice, think there had been a monsoon down the Ettrick, streams flowing down the road in places, bone dry on the roberton side.

what an buttock they have made of the road in the Ettrick, seem to have just sprayed the top with a thin layer of tarmac, could still see the original ines hrough the new tarmac - it's also already coming away in places

never mind though, it was still a cracking day out - only passed by two cars in 35 mile.
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