Cyclist died after relying on rear brake on Dales descent due to failed front brake

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ChrisP100
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Joined: 24 Sep 2020, 9:00am

Re: Cyclist died after relying on rear brake on Dales descent due to failed front brake

Postby ChrisP100 » 11 Dec 2020, 8:15am

Pete Owens wrote:
ChrisP100 wrote:Given that the front brake normally accounts for around 70% of your stopping power it was a lot worse than 50% compromised.

If you are going down a steep hill then your weight shifts forward even more than braking on the flat so your rear brake is not going to contribute significantly to slowing you down - though it can cause you to skid. Actually, the same also goes for emergency breaking - the maximum braking force is not limited by friction, but the point at which the rear wheel starts to lift when the back brake contributes nothing.

I had to put that principle into practice on Monday when a taxi driver pulled a u-turn right in front of me. It's pretty much instinctive now to throw my weight back and hang my backside over the back of the seat if I have to stop quickly. The roads are super greasy at the moment and it doesn't take much effort to lock up a back wheel if you aren't paying attention.

Jdsk
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Re: Cyclist died after relying on rear brake on Dales descent due to failed front brake

Postby Jdsk » 11 Dec 2020, 9:08am

horizon wrote:However, AIUI, the double system is also the fail safe: if one brake fails unexpectedly, there is always the other, even if it is only the back brake

Even if there were two fully effective and independent braking systems that wouldn't (necessarily) be fail-safe. It would be redundant or fault-tolerant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fail-safe

Jonathan

Jdsk
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Re: Cyclist died after relying on rear brake on Dales descent due to failed front brake

Postby Jdsk » 11 Dec 2020, 9:26am

reohn2 wrote:I don't buy the brake type having anything anything to do with this unfortunate incident.

The point about the Swiss cheese model is that every slice is relevant and crucial.

Jonathan

Cyril Haearn
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Re: Cyclist died after relying on rear brake on Dales descent due to failed front brake

Postby Cyril Haearn » 11 Dec 2020, 11:10am

What we can do now, is take chance to educate PoBs about brakes, before the same thing happens again
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ChrisP100
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Joined: 24 Sep 2020, 9:00am

Re: Cyclist died after relying on rear brake on Dales descent due to failed front brake

Postby ChrisP100 » 11 Dec 2020, 11:47am

Cyril Haearn wrote:What we can do now, is take chance to educate PoBs about brakes, before the same thing happens again

Education is vital, but it needs to be done from an early age. Certainly parental responsibility if you are going to purchase a bike for your kids.

I see loads of casual cyclists, and kids knocking about on visibly dangerous bikes. I was at a well known supermarket on Sunday, and there was a guy on a Trek MTB with the front V-brake sprung open and the cable just looped and tied loosely to the stem. There's also a guy who I pass most mornings. His bike sounds like a mechanical printing press with all its creaks, squeaks and groans. I noticed yesterday that his crank was knocking really badly as he was peddling, like he'd pretty much rounded the crank arm on his square taper BB.

I just don't think people realise the dangers, or understand the implications of not having a mechanically sound bike.

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Re: Cyclist died after relying on rear brake on Dales descent due to failed front brake

Postby Vorpal » 11 Dec 2020, 2:51pm

Discussion about disk brakes has been moved to viewtopic.php?f=5&t=142842 and this topic has been locked.
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