Slow Cycling

Commuting, Day rides, Audax, Incidents, etc.
Romeo Whisky
Posts: 47
Joined: 29 Apr 2009, 2:39pm
Location: East Lothian

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby Romeo Whisky » 27 May 2009, 5:41pm

geocycle wrote:Mine also go to the local surgery... but one of the GPs is a bike nut and borrows them.


leave a note inside the next one to say that he should join and get his own copy.

r

Fabini
Posts: 21
Joined: 15 Apr 2009, 6:12pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby Fabini » 27 May 2009, 5:49pm

chris667 wrote:Have you noticed that in the countries where cycling is seen as a normal activity very few people wear cycling-specific clothing? I think that's what we should aspire to.


I agree. When I first started cycling as a child and into teenage, I can't remember ever wearing anything but normal clothes. But then, I can't imagine wearing lycra riding this:
DutchBike.JPG

workhard

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby workhard » 27 May 2009, 9:05pm

from the rivendell people (who I generally regard as slightly crazy)

"At least one ride in 10, go without your sunglasses and gloves. Sometime next month, put some double-sided cheap-style pedals on a good bike and ride in non-cycling garb. It works shockingly well, and sends a good message to would-be bicycle riders."

I will if you will :wink:

random37
Posts: 1952
Joined: 19 Sep 2008, 4:41pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby random37 » 27 May 2009, 9:22pm

In fact, I always do. :wink:

glueman
Posts: 4354
Joined: 16 Mar 2007, 1:22pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby glueman » 27 May 2009, 9:26pm

Americans tend towards a compete faith in the latest thing, STI, SPD, carbon, titanium, helmets, lycra with an almost religious zeal. Rivendell are refreshingly anachronistic, even iconoclastic in their choices. I don't agree with all their conclusions but respect their right to claim them. They're honourary Bits in their dogmatic perversity and would fit in well with many a DA club ride.

gilesjuk
Posts: 3270
Joined: 17 Mar 2008, 10:10pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby gilesjuk » 27 May 2009, 10:01pm

It's all about money and time. People have money for cars, takeaways and ready meals, so they don't need to cycle or cook. Their health suffers as a result and these people go through the rest of their lives taking pain killers for back pain and demanding weight loss pills, gastric bands etc. so they can continue their unhealthy lifestyle.

When such people think about getting fit it is always the gym they turn to. It's somewhere they can drive to and have a TV to watch.

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Si
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Joined: 5 Jan 2007, 7:37pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby Si » 28 May 2009, 8:54am

"At least one ride in 10, go without your sunglasses and gloves. Sometime next month, put some double-sided cheap-style pedals on a good bike and ride in non-cycling garb. It works shockingly well, and sends a good message to would-be bicycle riders."


that'd be me riding to the allotments. Although I'm not sure which'd put people off more - my normal cycling togs or my grungy gardening clothes and boots..

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Velorum
Posts: 92
Joined: 25 May 2009, 12:04am
Location: Ruscombe, Berkshire

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby Velorum » 28 May 2009, 9:04am

brianleach wrote:This is all very well but it seems to me all the pictures of slow cycling are on flat roads.

To get to the station I have a sharp descent followed by an equally sharp ascent. Coming home I have a sharp descent followed by an equally sharp ascent.

I defy anyone unless considerably fitter than me to make either journey without sweating except in the depths of winter.

Brian


Appart from my multi speed folding Dahon (for camping and trips further afield - train / car etc) I use traditional fully enclosed chaincase roadsters on a daily basis. I regularly negotiate hills but rarely sweat as I often get off and push the bike. 25 years ago when I rode Reynolds framed sports bikes I would never of dreamed of doing this, now I approach things in a far more relaxed fashion and feel all the better for it. Its quite pleasant to push your bike up a hill!

http://theslowbicycle.blogspot.com/

Cheers
Ian

glueman
Posts: 4354
Joined: 16 Mar 2007, 1:22pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby glueman » 28 May 2009, 9:54am

For a few years either side of 1980 I rode just such a roadster. It's still the most comfortable - I mean really plush like a favourite armchair - bike I've ever ridden including recumbents. Whoever said it's like geared walking had it spot on. I toured on it and went to work and college on it, a completely different experience, a magic carpet.
Talking about it now makes me want one again.

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paulah
Posts: 593
Joined: 22 Jan 2008, 9:10am

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby paulah » 28 May 2009, 10:51pm

workhard wrote:from the rivendell people (who I generally regard as slightly crazy)

"At least one ride in 10, go without your sunglasses and gloves.


Yup they're definately a bit loopy. Unless there's scientific evidence that the sun hits the eyes less intently when cycling slower.
There shall be only one pannier

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paulah
Posts: 593
Joined: 22 Jan 2008, 9:10am

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby paulah » 28 May 2009, 11:13pm

Velorum wrote:Appart from my multi speed folding Dahon (for camping and trips further afield - train / car etc) I use traditional fully enclosed chaincase roadsters on a daily basis. I


I can go one better - a 20" and a 24" dahon. The latter is sort-of dutch style but better geared and a bit lighter. It's my favourite for short trips in the heavy local traffic because of the hub gears and riding position and I can wear smart clothes on it. Unfortunately it needs to go and see the wheel doctor.
There shall be only one pannier

hamster
Posts: 3786
Joined: 2 Feb 2007, 12:42pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby hamster » 29 May 2009, 9:14am

Just had a week's touring with the kids and rediscovered the joys of walking up hills with the bike! :D

pioneer
Posts: 1699
Joined: 13 Feb 2007, 10:39am

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby pioneer » 29 May 2009, 12:03pm

I thoroughly enjoyed the article in Cycle'.It is a bit of a pity though that only two bikes were featured and one of them is vastly overpriced. A Batavus or Gazelle my have been a better idea than the Velorbis.
But in principle I totally agree with the idea of sometimes just slowing down a bit and taking the time to smell the flowers and having the breath to say a cheery "hello!".Many of us ride a variety of bikes, my Dutch style roadster is my work bike and every once in a while,I take it for a longer ride just because I can.
But if we can introduce and persuade more people to cycle by using the message that not all cycling has to be eyeballs-out and lyra clad,then it has to be a good thing.
One thing the article didn't mention though,is slow-touring. I've used my work bike for a weeks' tour (only had two bikes then and it was the best one!),and very enjoyable it was too. Only did a about 55 a day with a max' one day of 65 miles,but it really didn't matter.

No,sometimes,slow is good!! :lol:

glueman
Posts: 4354
Joined: 16 Mar 2007, 1:22pm

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby glueman » 29 May 2009, 1:12pm

Not only slow touring but unplanned tours are most satisfying. My wife and I would arrive at Dieppe with the vaguest of aims and head into the French lanes. Some days we did 80 miles, some 50 others 10. Eat when we were hungry, stop when we liked the look of something.
Glorious.

Romeo Whisky
Posts: 47
Joined: 29 Apr 2009, 2:39pm
Location: East Lothian

Re: Slow Cycling

Postby Romeo Whisky » 29 May 2009, 2:37pm

I tood my Dad's roadster for a tour when I was 18. ex-polis bike with double crossbar, rod brakes, sprung saddle, swept back bars, etc. Feels glorious amongst traffic: sitting high and looking down on all the mortals, but distinctly not glorious when trying to go into a strong headwind, between Thurso and John O'Groats. I cut my losses and headed for Georgemas Junction and the train. Must get it out and fix it up. I seem to remember it had an odd size of wheels, and it was not so easy getting tyres for it.

The push for this type of bike does smack a little bit of fashion and marketing, which will pass again in a coulpe of years. I think Edinburgh is too hilly to use it for my regular commute.