Fixing a puncture on the road

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MikewsMITH2
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby MikewsMITH2 » 7 Oct 2013, 2:56pm

Well you can never ignore the psychological effects :lol:
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby Vorpal » 7 Oct 2013, 3:03pm

Increased contact area also increases traction (which will make it a little easier to push :lol:). Wider tyres, especially those with tread, depend upon the larger contact area to provide good traction. An overinflated touring tyre may have poor traction. If that is severe enough, it could be rather worse than the little bit of drag lost in reduced contact area.
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby ukdodger » 7 Oct 2013, 5:18pm

Mick F wrote:Yes.
Can't argue with the geometry and maths.

I can argue that it makes no real practical difference to me on the roads.

Narrow tyres - for me - will be faster.


I read in an issue of the mag that the harder the ride the more the vibration and the more the vibration the tireder the rider becomes thus slowing him down.

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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby [XAP]Bob » 7 Oct 2013, 5:26pm

Mick F wrote:Yes.
Can't argue with the geometry and maths.

I can argue that it makes no real practical difference to me on the roads.

Narrow tyres - for me - will be faster.

Even if you add in all the time spent at the pump :twisted:
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

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Mick F
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby Mick F » 7 Oct 2013, 5:42pm

Ha Ha!
:lol:
Good job I have a track pump eh?

As a different slant on this regarding tyre drag .............. do we want easy riding, or do we want some hard work?

I'm sort of known for towing a concrete block in my trailer. Maybe I ride a bike five or six days a week for the effort and enjoyment of a job well done, not for easy transport. Perhaps I should ride with soft tyres and the brakes on. :lol: :lol:
Mick F. Cornwall

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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby [XAP]Bob » 7 Oct 2013, 7:56pm

I think I pointed this out on page 1? - For you riding the bike is a "hobby", for many of us it is an essential form of transport, I have limited time for maintenance, and twice/thrice weekly pumping doesn't really figure in my list of things to look out for in a "practical transport".
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

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Mick F
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby Mick F » 8 Oct 2013, 8:44am

Yes, a hobby, and it always was, even though I commuted for years on it.
I didn't have to ride to work, it just made sense and I enjoyed it too. I also enjoyed the gasps of incredulity from colleagues that I even contemplated it!

Maybe there's many cycle-commuters who don't HAVE to ride to work, it just makes sense and is enjoyable. Maybe there's a "hobby" in all of we cyclists?
Mick F. Cornwall

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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby [XAP]Bob » 8 Oct 2013, 10:22am

Yes - absolutely I enjoy it, and I *could* use other forms of transport, but cycling is actually the most practical for me. Gives me most time with my family by allowing me to drop the kid(s) at (pre)school and then cycle past all the queueing traffic to work.

BUT - the key there is the time.
I don't want to be spending another couple of minutes each day making sure that my tyres are still within a few percent of the perfect tyre pressure. When my journey is a few minutes slower I'll add some air.
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby ukdodger » 8 Oct 2013, 11:00am

Mick F wrote:Yes, a hobby, and it always was, even though I commuted for years on it.
I didn't have to ride to work, it just made sense and I enjoyed it too. I also enjoyed the gasps of incredulity from colleagues that I even contemplated it!

Maybe there's many cycle-commuters who don't HAVE to ride to work, it just makes sense and is enjoyable. Maybe there's a "hobby" in all of we cyclists?


I cant imagine what it must be like riding on tyres that hard. But without being funny wouldnt solid rubber tyres be easier than constantly pumping them up?

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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby meic » 8 Oct 2013, 11:19am

Not whilst you are riding.

A few months ago my rear wheel failure meant that I borrowed somebody elses rear wheel, it had a 23mm tyre instead of my normal 35mm Marathon Racers.

I was quite surprised that despite being on rough Welsh mountain lanes, I didnt really notice much difference.
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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby [XAP]Bob » 8 Oct 2013, 12:36pm

120 psi is still 120 psi whhen compressed through it's full travel, solid tyrea cannot exhibit that force distribbution.

some new ers tyres are trying with complex materials, but only at low pressure at the moment
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

ChrisPAmbulance
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby ChrisPAmbulance » 8 Oct 2013, 1:00pm

Here's a thing - To what extent do people think that the road surface over which you ride has an effect on how long the tyres hold their pressure.

I pump my bike tyres up every coupe of weeks as a matter of course, so I don't notice much on the bike. But I have noticed that my car tyres need to be topped up far more often when I am driving in Cumbria (Where I work and the road surfaces are much rougher) and Staffordshire (Where I live, and where they have at least heard of tarmac!).

Could constantly bouncing off potholes or up and over speed bumps cause the air to be (literally or otherwise) knocked out of the tyres?

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Mick F
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby Mick F » 8 Oct 2013, 1:14pm

ukdodger wrote:I cant imagine what it must be like riding on tyres that hard. But without being funny wouldnt solid rubber tyres be easier than constantly pumping them up?
I cannot understand why you wouldn't need hard tyres! :lol:

Maybe - and this has been discussed many times - it's that I ride a beautifully made 531c steel bike with graceful flexible 531c forks. Basically speaking, I have a frame with built-in suspension.

Solid tyres are just that. Solid.
Pneumatic tyres have compliance built in, the wider the more compliant.

Narrow tyres need loadsa pressure to support the weight of the rider, and wider tyres need proportionally less pressure.

If you have a rigid alu frame, you would need wider more compliant tyres - and if you had narrow hard ones, your teeth would fall out.

Some folk talk of "road buzz" coming from the high frequency hard vibrations in the frame and 'bars. They get fatigued and distressed by this vibration. I don't have that at all despite hard narrow tyres.
Mick F. Cornwall

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mjr
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby mjr » 8 Oct 2013, 6:26pm

MikewsMITH2 wrote:Ok I will take on the challenge. My son is away at uni, so I will inflate his tyres to 120 tomorrow and check them next weekend they will be in a cool garage all week with no patches in the tubes, the presta valves screwed down tight and valve caps firmly tightened. We shall see...

Meanwhile, I'll see what difference tyre width makes in use... I've just put a new 28mm on the front, while I've got a 37mm on the back - both Schwalbe, both inflated to 80psi (sidewall marking says 85 but I figure I'm lighter than many and the bike is average). I'll see which loses more pressure in a week.

Also, if anyone wants to make their life harder work without adding a concrete block to the trailer, the Specialized Nimbus Armadillo is grippy as hell and inflates to 100psi. Picks up too much flint to be ideal for Norfolk, though.
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Re: Fixing a puncture on the road

Postby beetroot » 11 Oct 2013, 8:15pm

I did it today (fixed a puncture on the road - bloody hedge cutters!). Well I replaced the punctured inner tube with a spare. The biggest problem I had was the pathetic pump, which couldn't have been more than two or three inches long. So I couldn't get a decent pressure, but sufficient to get home. So it got me thinking, I need a better pump. I like frame fitted pumps, once that fit discreetly on the frame for example in conjunction with bottle holder attachment. Any recommendations?