Riding for 24 hours

Talk about events & rides. Find companions for your ride.
rossidevon
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Joined: 18 Jan 2015, 4:38pm

Riding for 24 hours

Postby rossidevon » 18 Jan 2015, 7:25pm

Hi guys,

In March I'm planning to ride 247 miles, from Plymouth to Pontardulais (about 10 miles west of Swansea), in 24 hours to raise money for a children’s cancer charity. For those that are interested I'm writing a blog about the planning, training and the ride itself: http://wp.me/p4NbsO-1O.

I currently ride about 100-120 miles a week, and will be upping that over the coming weeks.

So, to the burning question. The longest ride I have done is 100 and a bit miles, which is very different to 247 miles. Can anyone offer any advice, things that I may not have considered or little audax tricks for early hours dining.

Cheers

beardy
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Joined: 23 Feb 2010, 4:10pm

Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby beardy » 18 Jan 2015, 8:06pm

In March you are going to be doing a lot of that at night. Dont forget to get plenty of night riding practice in and some good lights.

You can refine your planned route to use more major roads when they are quieter at the wee hours of the night. Audax routes often have you on the main roads when it is dark, quiet and you are a bit tired yourself and prone to making mistakes if trying to navigate on little lanes with plenty of turnings.

The services at Aust, which I assume you will pass through were not open the one time that I went there at night despite the website saying they are 24 hour.

Will you have company on the ride, is it supported or are you totally on your own?

I see you have three 200k Audaxes on your training list but it appears you didnt do them. The other training is all good but there is nothing like doing long distances for training to do a long distance event.

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 19 Jan 2015, 10:17am

Hi,
I don't agree that riding long distances needs riding long distances at all, best training is shorter sharper rides I.M.O.
Anyway it looks like you are quite fit already :?:
You must be because you haven't got a lot of time to ride.
Night riding will slow you by 1+ MPH on a known route easy, Unknown :?:
Are you supported :?:
Are you alone :?:

All of this bares quite a lot.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

rossidevon
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Joined: 18 Jan 2015, 4:38pm

Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby rossidevon » 19 Jan 2015, 10:38am

Hi guys

Thanks for the input. I'm doing it with two others, not sure about a "support car" the bread knife is keen on us having one but I'm less so (which means I'm probably having one for part of the way, bonus of that is spare kit).

Wrt fitness, on my usual riding load I can do a 100 miles without completely exploding and feel ok to keep going. Initial plan is to brake it into four 100km rides with proper food stops, which might be an issue of the M48 bridge services are closed.

Navigation wise, I've got an Edge 800 to take the pressure off late night map reading and will probably very a backup battery too.

Night riding wise, I have done a bit, not huge amounts, including the Exmouth Exodus a couple of years ago and alot of my training has been at night due to having a young family.

beardy
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Joined: 23 Feb 2010, 4:10pm

Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby beardy » 19 Jan 2015, 10:50am

Training under distance can help build up your fitness and if you are capable of riding faster you will find the going easier. It doesnt teach you how to deal with the problems bought about by having to stay in the saddle (and awake) for a very long period without chances to rest or recuperate.
How to cope with and prevent saddlesoreness. Long distance training also teaches you how to conserve energy, you can do this from theory, but often that discipline can be lost when riding. You may be the sort who can blast at first and then "coast" the rest, you may not, you dont know until you try it.
You dont know how your body will react to the hydration and nutrition regime, it is common to have things go wrong with appetite and thirst somewhere before 24 hours.

I have seen very fit riders waltz into long distance Audaxes from short distance amazingly successfully.
I have seen many others fail through something that much lesser riders would consider a basic requirement, like having enough kit to cope with the cool of night when tired.

I think that one of the terms used is "conditioning" and at the longer distances this becomes almost as important as fitness.

freeflow
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Joined: 29 Aug 2011, 1:54pm

Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby freeflow » 19 Jan 2015, 10:58am

I don't agree that riding long distances needs riding long distances at all, best training is shorter sharper rides I.M.O.


Probably not for a one off ride. But if you ride long distances on a regular basis you learn a lot about minor tweaks that make your riding position more comfortable and efficient. The classic is a saddle that is perfectly comfy at 100km but has turned into a razor blade by 200km.

For the OP, it is unlikely that a Garmin 810 will run for a 24hour period so battery backup should be considered as essential is gps is your main means of navigation.

Also a good rule of thumb is that your average weekly mileage is a good indication of what you will be able to manage as a single ride.

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 19 Jan 2015, 12:16pm

Hi,
From the links on your opening page, strava -
2015-01-19_120017.jpg


Two people riding :?:
84.4 miles (135 k)
5 hrs 22 mins riding (moving)
5530 feet of climb (1680 mt)
15.8 MPH avg speed (moving)
65.5 feet / mile climbing.

Not bad.

I would say what's your problem :!:
Carry tools.
Spare batts for lights + spare lights.
Spare food (always).
Change in under wear / socks, after 12 hrs.
Enough clothes for a chill.
Everything in plastic bags.
Water carrying capacity on bike :?:
Start eating on bike at least 1-2 hours after you start and keep eating and drinking every half an hour.
The problem will creep in 18 hrs after you wake from sleep before ride, If you are not on stimulants (caffeine) then consider closing your eyes and laying down or sit still for twenty minutes after 12 hrs then every 3 hrs after that, after you nod off on bike there will be little to keep you safe apart from forced sleep.
As you are not alone I expect you to finish early.............

Good luck.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

stewartpratt
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Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby stewartpratt » 19 Jan 2015, 12:31pm

IME for big rides it's useful to scope out a few things by way of "training":
- issues in your riding position which only become apparent beyond the time you've previously spent in the saddle (neck aches, nerve problems, joint aches etc).
- how you push through the low points on the way (cramp, fatigue, hunger, etc).
- what level of effort you need to avoid exceeding if you're to just keep going.

These all need some long rides in advance; but I'd say if you did a 160 mile-or-so ride with a reasonable amount of it at night and everything was fine you'd be reasonably well prepared: two-thirds distance would be about my
"peace of mind threshold".

I think a 4x100km approach is a good starting point; it's pretty much what I'd use as I know I need feeding every 4 hours. The only thing I'd add from experience of doing up-to-300km and 500-600km rides, but not a 400, is that I find 350-400 probably the lowest point; though that may be because if you start first thing in the morning it comes up at the end of the night. I've seen posts on Yacf suggesting that starting a 400 in the afternoon/evening is wiser…

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NUKe
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Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby NUKe » 19 Jan 2015, 3:07pm

Food at night, take it with you, have some emergency rations, may be gel a few gels forthe saddle bag. A bit of preplanning and internet searches will tell you where the 24 hour garages are, truck stops aare usefulas well, Macdonalds have 24 hour restraunts and motorway services often have back entrances.


Keep warm even in Summer it can get chilly in the small hours.

the secret to distance is pace, everybody has different speeds for different distances.

having somebody to ride with can be a great help.

Prelplanning your route and reseaching it thoroughly can help.
Riding I'd say you need to have done a mix of long dstance and shorter harder rides before hand
NUKe
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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 19 Jan 2015, 3:24pm

Hi,
Where you are going could be as low as 5 C even in early summer, a mist will suck you up.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

thirdcrank
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Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 2:44pm

Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby thirdcrank » 19 Jan 2015, 4:02pm

... I see you have three 200k Audaxes on your training list but it appears you didnt do them. ...


I had a glance at your link but I'm too stupid to work out anything for myself. Excuse me if I comment on this bit secondhand. If this means that you were planning to do three quite long rides (but each less than half as long as your planned big distance) and you decided not to do any of them, then you need to reflect carefully on your reasons. BTW, the reasons are not important to the rest of us. If I'm planning even quite a short ride (and that's pretty much all I'm capable of these days) there's generally a little voice in one ear telling me how stupid it all is and how much better it would be to stay at home, go by car or whatever. Not everybody gets that kind of thing but anybody who does will wake up on the day of a big ride plagued with doubts and reasons for copping out, even if they are physically capable of doing it as planned and then retracing the whole route for seconds.

rjb
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Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby rjb » 23 Jan 2015, 6:28pm

It's worth giving some consideration to your starting time. By way of example we ran a club 200 miles in 24 hours ride. We started at 4pm giving us the chance to clock up 100 miles before midnight when we had a stop at a village hall and the chance to get some kip before we restarted the ride after a descent breakfast the following day knowing we had until 4pm to complete it. :wink:
At the last count:- Focus Variado, Peugeot 531 pro, Dawes Discovery Tandem, Dawes Kingpin, Raleigh 20, Falcon K2 MTB dropped bar tourer, Longstaff trike conversion on a Falcon corsa. :D

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Heltor Chasca
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Riding for 24 hours

Postby Heltor Chasca » 23 Jan 2015, 6:43pm

Hallucinations! Hallucinations! What about hallucinations?

I know it's not just me, but in the past when I've been extremely tired in the dark and when awake for more than 24hrs on various challenges or hikes it's incredible what tricks your mind can play. Causes mayhem with maps, kitting up properly, forgetfulness, confusion, irrational arguments with other team members, remembering to eat/drink etc.

And that's on foot with burgeons, not astride a 20mph velocipede. Be careful and aware..

Once while traveling in a remote area in Southern Africa I was left to 'look after' a broken down 4x4 while the others drove off in search of a mechanic in the middle of the night. I fell asleep. When the other vehicle returned I was nowhere to be found. I had exited the vehicle and slept walked out on a random bearing into the bush! Go figure...hc

rossidevon
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Joined: 18 Jan 2015, 4:38pm

Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby rossidevon » 24 Jan 2015, 10:15pm

We haven't got a concrete start time yet. Thinking of starting fairly late in the afternoon and doing the part I know best in the dark. Then when we're tired and on unfamiliar roads it will at least be light.

The sleep deprivation could be an interesting sub plot, who can have the weirdest dreams while micro napping at 30kmp

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Riding for 24 hours

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 24 Jan 2015, 11:21pm

Hi,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-24-hou ... e_disorder

"Without light to the retina, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), located in the hypothalamus, is not cued each day to synchronize the circadian rhythm to the 24-hour social day, resulting in non-24 for many totally blind individuals.[6] Non-24 is rare among visually impaired patients who retain at least some light perception. Researchers have found that even minimal light exposure at night can affect the body clock.[9]"

Nobody knows how it will affect you till it does.
I used to be a cronic insomniac, so I though staying awake would be easy but no.
I set off at 1730 and when the sun came up at 0530 I fell asleep..............
Normally you will start to fall asleep after about 18.5 hrs from waking, typically for me its about 20.
Having others around you might help, audaxers tend to grab sleep at check points where their sleeping bag has been transported, 1 & 1/2 - 3 hrs.
I don't hallucinate but cant cycle in a straight line about a foot wide which goes to four feet just before I blank for several seconds :!:
I don't do that anymore just recognise the straight line inability.
If you wait till its too late then you will need proper sleep before proceeding.
In 2014 I did two double devon coast to coasts one staying awake for 23 hrs when I got home, I am planning power naps in april when I start again, hoping to improve later day performance.
good luck.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..