Trangia stoves

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pjclinch
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby pjclinch » 4 May 2016, 1:41pm

bretonbikes wrote:The single most important part of a good cup of tea is the milk. If unpasturised straight from the cow it is a different drink...


Or better still, the absence of milk...

I stopped taking milk in tea particularly because stored milk and summer camping are not a happy mix, so if you can't get fresh from the cow I'd suggest leaving it out altogether. Most Brits consider this rather bitter, but that's just standard UK tea making for you. Brew a bit less and you get all the nice teay flavour without the bitter tannins that have you reaching for the milk (yes, it's yet another thing to learn from the Dutch...).

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

Mattie
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Mattie » 4 May 2016, 8:24pm

pjclinch wrote:
bretonbikes wrote:The single most important part of a good cup of tea is the milk. If unpasturised straight from the cow it is a different drink...


Or better still, the absence of milk...

I stopped taking milk in tea particularly because stored milk and summer camping are not a happy mix, so if you can't get fresh from the cow I'd suggest leaving it out altogether. Most Brits consider this rather bitter, but that's just standard UK tea making for you. Brew a bit less and you get all the nice teay flavour without the bitter tannins that have you reaching for the milk (yes, it's yet another thing to learn from the Dutch...).

Pete.


Is the Russians that put a pinch of salt in their tea ?

I have tried it and it removes the tannin taste, and salt brings out other flavours. It is okay, but do not need much, and better than nothing. But if lots of sugar is to hand then rather pile in lots of that !.

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leftpoole
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby leftpoole » 5 May 2016, 9:06am

Sweep wrote:
leftpoole wrote:http://www.pbase.com/leftpoole/image/159931365
meaning what?


Just a pleasant picture of a nice (mine) Trangia in breakfast mode!
John

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Sweep
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Sweep » 5 May 2016, 9:21am

oh, OK - I thought maybe you were trying to make some point about the relative merits of the two sizes - 25/27.

Sometimes a pic is worth rather less than ten words :)
Sweep

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Heltor Chasca
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Trangia stoves

Postby Heltor Chasca » 5 May 2016, 11:10am

Crikey! What do you lot eat? My 27 is fine for me and both daughters. I would probably only think about the 25 for 4 people.

An example meal I would prepare is a pan with rice and another with veg and chorizo. The rest is made up of 'finger food' like nuts, olives fruit etc.

Still got the kettle handy for a brew and that means a spare hand for the wine too

kilroya
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby kilroya » 27 May 2016, 10:29am

Will a Trangia be powerful enough to get a Bialetti Brikka brewing do you think?

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Sweep
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Sweep » 27 May 2016, 11:10am

Planet X wrote:Will a Trangia be powerful enough to get a Bialetti Brikka brewing do you think?

How were you planning to support it over the flame?
I use a Trangia but to tell the truth find it easier to put my Bialetti on a small Pocket Rocket gas stove knock off.

Very fast and convenient. Seems faster than the stove at home in fact.
Sweep

hamster
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby hamster » 27 May 2016, 11:12am

Depends on the support - if it's a triangle etc you will be fine. For a windshield version I would check it sits on the pan support lugs.

It has the heat output, but will take a while.

Agreed that a camping stove often works better than a domestic cooker - I suspect it's the smaller burner size.

kilroya
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby kilroya » 27 May 2016, 11:28am

Cheers guys.
I'm on a triangle ;-)

kilroya
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby kilroya » 27 May 2016, 11:37am

Bit of a coffee head.
Have two regular Bialettis, an Aeropress and at home, a Gaggia Classic but.......
...but..... have bought my first Trangia and want to give it a go soon in the bush.

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syklist
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby syklist » 28 May 2016, 8:19pm

Heltor Chasca wrote:Crikey! What do you lot eat? My 27 is fine for me and both daughters. I would probably only think about the 25 for 4 people.


A one pot meal for two people based on a soup package that needs 1 l of water and some pasta. Other ingredients include fried onions, maybe some broccoli or peas or sweetcorn, a handful of TV, or some tofu, seaweed (if we have it) and seasoning to taste. You need the bigger pots of a 25 to do that and even then they are sometimes a bit on the small side. I did use a 2.5l billy with a 27 but the packed size (27 inside the billy) is the same as a 25 and the 27 + billy weighs more than a 25. The big pot sits on top of the 27 like the frying pan and it seems to take longer to cook a one pot meal than in a 25 pan. Especially if there is a bit of a breeze.

I like the 25's kettle as our morning coffee ritual requires around a litre of water and our lunchtime cuppa is made in two 500ml cups. So the 25 wins again there. Plus the big frying pan is handy when frying large veggie schnitzels that we buy every now and again when we have a rest day.
Last edited by syklist on 28 May 2016, 8:30pm, edited 1 time in total.
So long and thanks for all the fish...

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syklist
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby syklist » 28 May 2016, 8:29pm

pjclinch wrote:
bretonbikes wrote:The single most important part of a good cup of tea is the milk. If unpasturised straight from the cow it is a different drink...


Or better still, the absence of milk...

I stopped taking milk in tea particularly because stored milk and summer camping are not a happy mix, ...

We take full cream powdered milk with us. It is available in many supermarkets here. It does the trick for us in our tea and coffee. If we buy fresh milk then it is either during the day and we drink it then and there or at the end of the day if there is a shop near where we are camping. Anything not drunk in the evening gets finished at breakfast the next day. A bigger problem milk for Junior especially when wild camping. He didn't take to reconstituted dried milk the last time we tried it. UHT is almost impossible to find here, the only easily available UHT milk is goats milk. Or non-milk milks.
So long and thanks for all the fish...

bohrsatom
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby bohrsatom » 2 Jun 2016, 7:31pm

bohrsatom wrote:I was going to start a new thread but given there are 11 pages dedicated to the Trangia, here seems good enough!

My current MSR pot needs replacing. It's all very good - a single 2L pot, two bowls and two mugs which nest into each other. We like to cook food (as opposed to just boiling water) and twinned with a remote gas stove it does a reasonable job preparing meals of pasta/rice with chilli/bolognese out of a can. However it's not great for frying - too deep and despite being ceramic non stick I found things still got burnt on.

I'm in two minds about whether to replace it with another MSR pot + frying pan, or get a Trangia instead. I have a reasonable idea of the pros/cons of each...


So I went for the Trangia over the MSR pot/fry pan combo and used it for the first time over the weekend. Overall impressions are good. I chose one with the gas burner as I can't be bothered with meths and found it to be fast to boil but with a low enough setting to facilitate simmering as well.

The 25 was definitely the right size for two. A dinner of pasta, veg and bacon took almost the entire 1.75L pot. Nonstick great for cooking scrambled eggs.

The only downside is that a cooked breakfast every day meant we got through gas twice as quick!

Aunty Social
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Aunty Social » 8 Jun 2016, 7:39pm

Sweep wrote:
Planet X wrote:Will a Trangia be powerful enough to get a Bialetti Brikka brewing do you think?

How were you planning to support it over the flame?
I use a Trangia but to tell the truth find it easier to put my Bialetti on a small Pocket Rocket gas stove knock off.

Very fast and convenient. Seems faster than the stove at home in fact.

Three cheap and nasty tent pegs through the base air holes make for a reasonable Bialetti support.

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Sweep
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Re: Trangia stoves

Postby Sweep » 8 Jun 2016, 8:31pm

Am genuinelly impressed aunty social, tho tend to think that a quick recourse to the gas rocket is easier, it's also handy to have a separate compact stove with an alternative power source.
But, yes, thanks for the suggestion.
Sweep