A decent saddle.

Bill Reynolds
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A decent saddle.

Postby Bill Reynolds » 14 Sep 2016, 12:06am

I know this section is aimed at women but I see lots of topic headings on it relating to saddles. I have great hip pain from being knocked off my Yamaha in the middle 1970''s plus problems with the rest of my joints from the same accident. I have been down the Brookes route and blow up saddles not to mention saddles with cut-outs! I tried something different....a Hobson Easy Seat 2...a twin seat with adjustable sideways movement. No more sweaty saddle contact, no more numb bits, no more sitting on a old railway sleeper effect...You can wear normal shorts as the crease that goes under your crouch is in mid air so to speak and any sideways creases are alright as there is no saddle contact. Another problem I have is a hernia from over heavy mail bags. I started to wear a truss recently. The truss has a strap that goes under your leg to support the truss...no problem with the Hobson, I forgot I was wearing a truss....murder with a Brookes.....Try one and give it a good try....

Bill Reynolds
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Bill Reynolds » 13 Jan 2017, 9:34pm

I have been making myself a 'W.D. Reynolds Special' touring cycle to use along side my Dahon Vitesse 8 speed folding cycle. The 'Special' for sole all day cycling use and the Dahon for train assisted rides. I tried everywhere in England to obtain a Hobson EasySeat 2 to fit to the new cycle ...BUT, every stockist I contacted in this country was sold out!... (What does THAT tell you?)... In the end I had to order one from America via Ebay. I see nobody replied to this message. It does not worry me one bit. The saddle remains a really wonderful invention and my wife has one on her Dahon as well....what more can I say?

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Paulatic
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Paulatic » 13 Jan 2017, 9:56pm

Bill Reynolds wrote:I have been making myself a 'W.D. Reynolds Special' touring cycle to use along side my Dahon Vitesse 8 speed folding cycle. The 'Special' for sole all day cycling use and the Dahon for train assisted rides. I tried everywhere in England to obtain a Hobson EasySeat 2 to fit to the new cycle ...BUT, every stockist I contacted in this country was sold out!... (What does THAT tell you?)... In the end I had to order one from America via Ebay. I see nobody replied to this message. It does not worry me one bit. The saddle remains a really wonderful invention and my wife has one on her Dahon as well....what more can I say?

Either they are really good sellers or there is little demand for them.
Im guessing you are Big Bum Bill! :lol:
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Bill Reynolds
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Location: North Worcestershire

Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Bill Reynolds » 19 Jan 2017, 10:10pm

Well, of course if the stockists have none in stock NOW it means that they are sold out...even the stockist I purchased the last Hobson saddle from! Don't worry though Paulatic, I smile when I read of all the moans on here about the traditional saddles hurting botties...

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mjr
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby mjr » 20 Jan 2017, 12:28pm

Did you try a Lycett-style mattress saddle? They used to be fairly common, especially on "ladies'" bikes, but seem unpopular now except for retro restorations. I've got one on one of mine and rode a 100k on it last weekend - no saddle pain. I had some arm pain, but that was because I didn't have the handlebars quite right and foolishly refused to stop to adjust them. I also was slightly annoyed by some spring squeaking from the saddle, but a smear of grease will deal with that!
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Bill Reynolds
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Location: North Worcestershire

Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Bill Reynolds » 26 Jan 2017, 2:21pm

Thanks for that MJR. My wife's old cycle had one and it was quite comfortable, but that too had the usual 'nose' sticking out in front to make your bits uncomfortable! Reading all the messages on this section about saddle problems, I can only add that if you don't try something different AND give it a good go...Like the Hobson saddles...you wont get a comfortable saddle or ride...ever.

Bill Reynolds
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Location: North Worcestershire

Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Bill Reynolds » 2 Aug 2017, 12:49am

Very strange how things work out. Recently my wife and myself put our Dahon folders into our car and went to ride the Monsal trail. The trail is in a nice location with a decent café to stop at for a meal but is also rather long and saddle time is thus... the same. At the end of the ride my wife told me the special so-called 'Women's Saddle' with the cut-outs and under springing that I had purchased for her was painful to ride. A painful ride is NOT a enjoyable one! I managed to obtain yet another Hobson saddle for her cycle....she's happy now!

Flinders
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Flinders » 7 Sep 2017, 10:51am

After reading posts here and elsewhere, I have just gone for the Selle Italia Diva.

It's firmer than my previous saddle, less 'spongy' (the old one's padding was probably on its last legs, it always was a bit soft but is now far too spongy, it just ensures that the pressure ends up even on all my bits, delicate or not), and the cut-out on the Diva extends further back, which for me means it's more in the right place. Seems to keep weight off the delicate bits much better. Narrower at the front, which is much nicer for me. Weirdly, it feels like I am going faster - my input seems to be better transmitted. But on a short journey just back from the bike shop I can't be sure. :mrgreen:

But it is early days; I am concerned it could be a bit narrow for my sitbones. I'm just off for the first proper ride on it to see how it goes.

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Audax67
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Audax67 » 7 Sep 2017, 11:02am

Selle Anatomica don't differentiate between male & female saddles. Never have. The company is owned by a woman.
Have we got time for another cuppa?

Flinders
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Flinders » 11 Sep 2017, 8:04pm

After a couple of rides getting used to it, I decided to do a careful check on height and position. There seems to be a lot of argument in various articles about fore and aft positioning, but less about height. As the saddle is less thick and firmer than my previous one, I thought it might need to go higher.

I got Mr Flinders to check my ankle-knee-thigh angle when my leg and foot were in usual bottom position- 30%. The previous saddle was set as low as it could go, which would have been too high on this showing, so this one ought to be better in position.

Fore-and-aft I thought the new one was a bit too far forward. In fact, it's further back than the old one. Turns out I'm not actually sitting in the right place on the new one. Being unused to having the weight all on my sitbones I've been sliding forward to even up the pressure (which is dead wrong, but is because I'm used to having a bit of pressure on everything rather than most of it where it should be, on the sitbones).

So now I need to do some more riding sitting further back in the saddle and get used to the pressure on my sitbones, and see how it goes.

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531colin
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby 531colin » 12 Sep 2017, 7:43pm

Weight should be on your bum bones, which usually means sitting on the broad back bit of the saddle. (The exception to this is if you rotate your pelvis very far forward, for example to get very low over the bars, because your bum bones are closer together at the front than at the back.)
Saddle setback is easy....your saddle needs to be far enough back so that you are in balance, and you can maintain your usual riding position without your hands on the bars, without straining.......
Image
There are all sorts of "magic" formulae for saddle height.....I don't believe any of them.
The modern way seems to be to have your saddle as high as you can possibly manage, so that you get "maximum power" when your knee is almost straight......I do want "maximum power"....but not all the time....Most of the time, I'm just turning the pedals with relatively little effort, although at a reasonably high cadence, so I want the saddle low enough that I can be smooth through the bottom of the pedal stroke at all times. On the odd occasion when I'm actually looking for "maximum power" I find I drop my heel more, and sit further back in the saddle; both of these things result in more knee extension....as in "forcing the gear" here.....
Image
There is more on setting up your riding position (and, importantly, how it feels when I ride) in my article about bike fit, linked from my signature strip.

Flinders
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Flinders » 14 Sep 2017, 11:46am

Colin, that guide is wonderful, so thorough and sensible, thank you so much. :D
It's basically all the good advice I wasted days digging out from all over the place in one document, plus a lot of other really useful stuff I didn't know about and which wasn't mentioned anywhere I looked. I was especially interested in what you say about the bumbones being closer together if you lean more forward- I was wondering why on my new saddle I was comfortable with its width once I got into my usual forward position but had felt it might be a bit narrow when sitting up still on the turbo.

Your guide is worth a read for anyone, and especially so for anyone setting up a bike or a saddle.

In my case, my saddle height is limited at the low end because it's already as low as the frame will allow on an XXS frame- I'm a 5' tall female with proportionately short legs, who needs a longish stem for a back that's easily as long as the back of someone anything up to about 8" taller. Your point about problems with small frames is well made, and appreciated; few other people seem to be aware of it.

The advice about riding bumps is interesting, as a horse rider I realise I do that 'weight mostly but not all out of the saddle' and 'fore and aft' balancing automatically on the bike, just as I would riding on rough ground to keep my weight off the horse's back and free its legs to balance.
Last edited by Flinders on 14 Sep 2017, 11:47am, edited 1 time in total.

Flinders
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Flinders » 14 Sep 2017, 11:47am

deleted due to posting twice by accident, sorry.

Bill Reynolds
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby Bill Reynolds » 26 Sep 2017, 10:14pm

The above messages are counter productive. After decades of trying to get/find a cycle saddle to allow me to cycle in comfort despite my post accident problems, I found bliss in buying the mentioned Hobson saddle. Despite a worsening situation regarding my hips the Hobson saddles I have fitted to my cycles continue to do what they claim to do....allow me to use normal shorts and trousers in great comfort. If people have a desire to use 'normal' saddles, then please carry on, I only know what I find from using the mentioned saddle!

pwa
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Re: A decent saddle.

Postby pwa » 29 Sep 2017, 10:34am

My recently purchased Brooks C17 Carved, with a cut-out, has certainly removed concerns about pressure on the perineum. It replaces a Rolls that was proving uncomfortable in that area. But as someone who experiences some discomfort in the sit-bone area it has proved to be okay rather than life transforming. Better than the Rolls, and okay on short rides (10 miles) without a pad, better with a pad on rides longer than that.

I imagine there are women for whom a C17 Carved might be a good choice.