Do you love your job?

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pete75
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby pete75 » 30 May 2018, 6:57pm

Cunobelin wrote:
pete75 wrote:
Thornyone wrote:“...the same job...”. It would depend entirely upon which grade in the job you were employed at. The vast majority of retired NHS workers, whether ex nuclear med or whatever, wouldn’t be in danger of paying 40% tax on their pensions.


He was a consultant radiologist. I suspect that after 22 years Cunobelin will also be a consultant. Maybe ancillary workers won't be getting big pensions but almost all medical staff be they hospital based or a GP will get bigish pensions.


I am not a Consultant ... and neither my present wage, nor pension will attract 40% tax


Not a Consultant - after 22 years in radiology??

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 30 May 2018, 8:27pm

Hi,
Two trips to radiography.

1) Lumps down there.............definitely the radiographer wish they did not have to do that late in evening to the opposite sex.............hold that out the way like that...blah blah..................I was more angry than embarrassed..............
Its obvious that they did not want to be there by their attitude.............their sidekick was more helpful in my attempt to clean up before pulling up my pants :(

2) Could not stand or walk without crutches.........I dropped my coat on floor.........no where to put coat..............the operator just walked off to leave me struggling to bend down......................

Not my memory of trips to hospital 20 - 35 years ago.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

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Cunobelin
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby Cunobelin » 31 May 2018, 8:53am

pete75 wrote:
Cunobelin wrote:
pete75 wrote:
He was a consultant radiologist. I suspect that after 22 years Cunobelin will also be a consultant. Maybe ancillary workers won't be getting big pensions but almost all medical staff be they hospital based or a GP will get bigish pensions.


I am not a Consultant ... and neither my present wage, nor pension will attract 40% tax


Not a Consultant - after 22 years in radiology??


I prefer to work......

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Cunobelin
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby Cunobelin » 31 May 2018, 8:54am

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Two trips to radiography.

1) Lumps down there.............definitely the radiographer wish they did not have to do that late in evening to the opposite sex.............hold that out the way like that...blah blah..................I was more angry than embarrassed..............
Its obvious that they did not want to be there by their attitude.............their sidekick was more helpful in my attempt to clean up before pulling up my pants :(

2) Could not stand or walk without crutches.........I dropped my coat on floor.........no where to put coat..............the operator just walked off to leave me struggling to bend down......................

Not my memory of trips to hospital 20 - 35 years ago.



I have glasses and a greying beard. I am however not responsible for Harold Shipman either

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 31 May 2018, 9:17am

Hi,
Cunobelin wrote:
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Two trips to radiography.

1) Lumps down there.............definitely the radiographer wish they did not have to do that late in evening to the opposite sex.............hold that out the way like that...blah blah..................I was more angry than embarrassed..............
Its obvious that they did not want to be there by their attitude.............their sidekick was more helpful in my attempt to clean up before pulling up my pants :(

2) Could not stand or walk without crutches.........I dropped my coat on floor.........no where to put coat..............the operator just walked off to leave me struggling to bend down......................

Not my memory of trips to hospital 20 - 35 years ago.



I have glasses and a greying beard. I am however not responsible for Harold Shipman either

Sorry that must have come over very bad :oops:
I was not directing comments at all radiographers, just how things, how bad it seems today in the nhs.
Don't even start me on cleaners in the nhs!

Sign of the times, though I am not sure if its poor management, poor attitudes / wrong person wrong job or how we are today.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby [XAP]Bob » 31 May 2018, 9:24am

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:I was not directing comments at all radiographers, just how things, how bad it seems today in the nhs.
Don't even start me on cleaners in the nhs!

Sign of the times, though I am not sure if its poor management, poor attitudes / wrong person wrong job or how we are today.


It's do to with the fact that they aren't treated like people any more. They are treated as resources to be allocated.

Talking to one of the cleaning staff when I was in hospital for a while earlier this year she wasn't "allowed" any more time off sick this year...
They are dehumanised by management, which has generally been outsourced...
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 31 May 2018, 9:37am

[XAP]Bob wrote:
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:I was not directing comments at all radiographers, just how things, how bad it seems today in the nhs.
Don't even start me on cleaners in the nhs!

Sign of the times, though I am not sure if its poor management, poor attitudes / wrong person wrong job or how we are today.


It's do to with the fact that they aren't treated like people any more. They are treated as resources to be allocated.

Talking to one of the cleaning staff when I was in hospital for a while earlier this year she wasn't "allowed" any more time off sick this year...
They are dehumanised by management, which has generally been outsourced...


That's one argument, but I cant agree, just because you are treated badly in your job is no excuse for passing on the misery.
I can see the logic in it but not all workers will succumb to bad standards.
NHS, oh it needs sorting, but part of the problem is that like councils there is much room for improvement in efficiency, material and time.
Computer interface between GP and Hospitals.
Sourcing better prices for material, food as well as medical, (several decades ago the NHS was criticised for paying more for cornflakes than local Tesco sells to its customers....................not sure that still goes on today but it would not surprise me.
The list goes on and as we know politics just muddies the water.
If You Don't Try You Don't Do.....Don't Do You Don't Get...I'm Still Trying....Well Very..
You'll Find Me At The Top Of A Hill...............Somewhere...After Dark..

pete75
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby pete75 » 31 May 2018, 10:24am

Cunobelin wrote:
pete75 wrote:
Cunobelin wrote:
I am not a Consultant ... and neither my present wage, nor pension will attract 40% tax


Not a Consultant - after 22 years in radiology??


I prefer to work......


I think consultants do work - for example most non simple operations are carried out by a consultant.

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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby [XAP]Bob » 31 May 2018, 10:43pm

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:
[XAP]Bob wrote:
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:I was not directing comments at all radiographers, just how things, how bad it seems today in the nhs.
Don't even start me on cleaners in the nhs!

Sign of the times, though I am not sure if its poor management, poor attitudes / wrong person wrong job or how we are today.


It's do to with the fact that they aren't treated like people any more. They are treated as resources to be allocated.

Talking to one of the cleaning staff when I was in hospital for a while earlier this year she wasn't "allowed" any more time off sick this year...
They are dehumanised by management, which has generally been outsourced...


That's one argument, but I cant agree, just because you are treated badly in your job is no excuse for passing on the misery.
I can see the logic in it but not all workers will succumb to bad standards.
NHS, oh it needs sorting, but part of the problem is that like councils there is much room for improvement in efficiency, material and time.
Computer interface between GP and Hospitals.
Sourcing better prices for material, food as well as medical, (several decades ago the NHS was criticised for paying more for cornflakes than local Tesco sells to its customers....................not sure that still goes on today but it would not surprise me.
The list goes on and as we know politics just muddies the water.

Yes, but it’s also very easy to have all the care beaten out of you.

One of the best people I had looking after me was an HCA (health care assistant) who was, AFAICT, not highly trained - but also had just four people who she was responsible for. Yes she’s get called off to other bays and wards to help occasionally - but her job was to spend time with the four of us. Given that it was a neuro ward - and two patients were beyond significant communicating after recent strokes that meant time was there...
And that is what people need - time and respect. If you give them neither then it *will* trickle down.

Been a ‘motto’ of mine for a long time... “always be nice to dinner ladies”.
If you want a cycling version, then think of the janitor - they have keys to the boiler room ;)
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

Vorpal
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby Vorpal » 31 May 2018, 11:18pm

I don't love my job. I'm not currently working in any of the fields I want to work in, nor the ones I am educated to work in. I am working in a related field, Quality. It's one that I am knowledgeable about. I was transferred a couple of years ago in a reorganisation. If I'm honest, it's occasionally interesting, occasionally frustrating, and mostly boring. I'm looking for a job, but my Norwegian isn't good enough to get one outside my network, and there is lots of competition for jobs in the companies that use English as their business language.

If I could find a way to not work, or work hours of my choosing, I would be content to do so. I'm not really interested in starting a business. It's too much work. And I've been a manager, and prefer to be an engineer, just because I hate office/company politics.

So, I'm kind of stuck with what I've got for the time being. I keep trying, though, and eventually I'll get a break, or my Norwegian will pass the threshold that potential employers think is competitive, or at least good enough that my other skills and expertise make up for it.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

brynpoeth
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby brynpoeth » 1 Jun 2018, 5:18am

Vorpal wrote:I don't love my job. I'm not currently working in any of the fields I want to work in, nor the ones I am educated to work in. I am working in a related field, Quality. It's one that I am knowledgeable about. I was transferred a couple of years ago in a reorganisation. If I'm honest, it's occasionally interesting, occasionally frustrating, and mostly boring. I'm looking for a job, but my Norwegian isn't good enough to get one outside my network, and there is lots of competition for jobs in the companies that use English as their business language.

If I could find a way to not work, or work hours of my choosing, I would be content to do so. I'm not really interested in starting a business. It's too much work. And I've been a manager, and prefer to be an engineer, just because I hate office/company politics.

So, I'm kind of stuck with what I've got for the time being. I keep trying, though, and eventually I'll get a break, or my Norwegian will pass the threshold that potential employers think is competitive, or at least good enough that my other skills and expertise make up for it.

May you stay in Norway for ever, what residency status do you have?
What if Norway joins the EU? Or leaves EFTA? :?
What are you doing to improve your Norwegian?
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Vorpal
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby Vorpal » 1 Jun 2018, 7:02am

brynpoeth wrote:May you stay in Norway for ever, what residency status do you have?
What if Norway joins the EU? Or leaves EFTA? :?
What are you doing to improve your Norwegian?

I don't know about forever, but I like it here, and probably won't leave at least until the kids are done with university (they are 9 & 11, now)
I am a permanent resident here. I got permanent residency last year.
I read in Norwegian, use it everyday, as much as possible. Sometimes I use Duolingo. I feel a bit stuck at my current level. I think I need to take lessons or a course. I manage fine with day to day things, shopping, schools, etc., but I can struggle with complex conversations. The main problem is that I don't get many opportunities to practice at complex conversations. I can do some stuff in Norwegian at work, and sometimes I have to. In the workshop, I work with some folks who don't speak English very well. But that only seems to improve specific (and not otherwise very helpful) vocabulary.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

Stradageek
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby Stradageek » 1 Jun 2018, 9:36am

A degree in physiology and psychology, six years with Unilever designing products that housewives (a thankfully long-dead designation) didn't need, then thirty five years in electronics R&D. Still don't really understand what I do, which makes every day a challenge, but bright and fun people to work with. Have survived twelve rounds of redundancies in that time but have finally become disillusioned with that fact that all I'm really doing is making senior directors and US shareholder very rich. Retiring soon, hopefully, and will finally dismantle that 5-star hub and find out why Brucey maintains that it is such rubbish.

I have, however, been known to sit at my desk in times of crisis and quote Emily Blunt from 'The Devils Wears Prada'

A prize for getting the right quote....

brynpoeth
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby brynpoeth » 1 Jun 2018, 7:20pm

Vorpal wrote:
brynpoeth wrote:May you stay in Norway for ever, what residency status do you have?
What if Norway joins the EU? Or leaves EFTA? :?
What are you doing to improve your Norwegian?

I don't know about forever, but I like it here, and probably won't leave at least until the kids are done with university (they are 9 & 11, now)
I am a permanent resident here. I got permanent residency last year.
I read in Norwegian, use it everyday, as much as possible. Sometimes I use Duolingo. I feel a bit stuck at my current level. I think I need to take lessons or a course. I manage fine with day to day things, shopping, schools, etc., but I can struggle with complex conversations. The main problem is that I don't get many opportunities to practice at complex conversations. I can do some stuff in Norwegian at work, and sometimes I have to. In the workshop, I work with some folks who don't speak English very well. But that only seems to improve specific (and not otherwise very helpful) vocabulary.

Like you in Norway, I *may* stay in Germany for ever :wink:
Is Norwegian harder for an adult English-speaking person to learn than German?

I am fluent in German and very well-read, better informed than many natives/colleagues, often my accent is a plus, people think it is cute, I can speak quickly and argue and explain, had a job training people

German colleagues had English at school but they did not learn much, they really need my help to write simple mails, but does anyone like asking for help?

But writing German correctly is still difficult for me, although it should be possible with the marvels of technology
I have a half-decent job but I too could/should have done better

Don't have time or energy for a course, I use the language all the time anyway. Except the few hours a week on these fora %)

Did torture myself a bit years ago reading long novels (Deutschstunde/German Lesson by Siegfried Lenz, 1984 in German ..) but that is not so painful now :wink:
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Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
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brynpoeth
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Re: Do you love your job?

Postby brynpoeth » 2 Jun 2018, 8:25am

Thornyone wrote:I am now retired but I couldn’t wait to retire, and in fact I decided to finish a little ahead of time, so that money (shortage thereof) is now definitely an ongoing issue. But it was certainly a case of leaving or suffering mentally. I worked in the NHS. At one time I loved the job and actually looked forward to going to work, and I always got on really well with patients and the vast majority of my work colleagues. However, constant changes (for the worst) to working practices of the “tick box culture” kind (i.e. filling in a hundred tick boxes to say one has treated correctly rather than having time to concentrate on doing so), ever increasing workload to the point of feeling you were pushing patients along a production line, and latterly, ever-increasing technological change at a time of life when such things are harder to deal with, made it pretty-much intolerable. I know so many people who have felt the same as they approach retirement. The thought of having to carry on ‘til 68 or older in anything other than a “tea-boy” role seems absurd.

Years ago I spent a period of time unemployed, and it was awful. It wasn’t that I couldn’t find a thousand things to occupy my time, rather the financial worries and the stigma, but above all, the not knowing whether one would be in this state for a month, ten years or permanently. And one of the best times I’ve known was the month or so of free time I had once I found work but before it started, when I could then enjoy the free time.

One of the WORST times I had was the month before going to Germany, after being offered the job. Not sure why, uncertainty?*
Schmidbauer, a German psychologist explained it quite well, mind, and Goethe: Die am Erfolg scheitern, those who come to grief in success
* The human psyche is a queer thing indeed
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life