Moulton tsr 8

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Rogthedodge
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Moulton tsr 8

Postby Rogthedodge » 12 Jul 2018, 1:57pm

Hi

I retired in June and want to start cycling again.
I stopped a few years ago due to hip problems but recently had both hips replaced.

I'm interested in the Pashley Moulton TSR 8 as I want a step over frame and plan to use it on leisure rides on canal and cycle paths.
I also have limited storage space for the bike.
Please can anyone advise if this is a good bike or if there are better alternatives.

Many thanks

Brucey
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby Brucey » 12 Jul 2018, 4:18pm

it is a good bike but it is quite different from most others; ride before you buy! BTW if you want a low step over height, there are lower.

cheers
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Mick F
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby Mick F » 13 Jul 2018, 6:46am

The TSR isn't easy as a step-through. The central bit isn't that low, and it's wide as well.

Just measured mine:
At the step-through area, it's 2ft off the ground and 6ins wide.
Mick F. Cornwall

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fossala
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby fossala » 13 Jul 2018, 7:38am

If it was only town paths you could look into one of the early model F Moultons. Lower standover hight and for town paths, a better ride.

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pjclinch
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby pjclinch » 13 Jul 2018, 6:28pm

I have (and very much like) a TSR8. I think it's a very good bike that's pretty good at most things, comfortable and easy to live with.

"Low step-through" will depend on how long your legs are and how you want to use it. Certainly mine lets me dismount easily by simply rotating in the saddle and stepping off. Getting on I tend to do a rolling mount and take a leg over the back, but it's not too hard to step over (and I'm 5'8"/1.73m with short legs as a point of reference), though it's not as easy as my Brom.

fossala wrote:If it was only town paths you could look into one of the early model F Moultons. Lower standover hight and for town paths, a better ride.


Lower standover, yes, but why do you think a better ride on a tow-path? I can't think of any reason that should be the case... Plus you'd probably have to do quite a restoration job on a very old bike, as opposed to just buying a new one.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

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fossala
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby fossala » 14 Jul 2018, 6:33am

pjclinch wrote:I have (and very much like) a TSR8. I think it's a very good bike that's pretty good at most things, comfortable and easy to live with.

"Low step-through" will depend on how long your legs are and how you want to use it. Certainly mine lets me dismount easily by simply rotating in the saddle and stepping off. Getting on I tend to do a rolling mount and take a leg over the back, but it's not too hard to step over (and I'm 5'8"/1.73m with short legs as a point of reference), though it's not as easy as my Brom.

fossala wrote:If it was only town paths you could look into one of the early model F Moultons. Lower standover hight and for town paths, a better ride.


Lower standover, yes, but why do you think a better ride on a tow-path? I can't think of any reason that should be the case... Plus you'd probably have to do quite a restoration job on a very old bike, as opposed to just buying a new one.

Pete.

The suspension is smoother front and rear. I think Moulton only moved away from them suspension designs because Raleigh held the patent. If you want flat bars it has a longer "top tube". I don't know why Moulton uses the same frame for flat bars and drops, no one else does.

Brucey
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby Brucey » 14 Jul 2018, 7:05am

fossala wrote: ….. If you want flat bars it has a longer "top tube". I don't know why Moulton uses the same frame for flat bars and drops, no one else does.


well few others use the same frame size for all riders either. Handlebar shape is small beer by comparison?

cheers
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fossala
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby fossala » 14 Jul 2018, 7:14am

Brucey wrote:
fossala wrote: ….. If you want flat bars it has a longer "top tube". I don't know why Moulton uses the same frame for flat bars and drops, no one else does.


well few others use the same frame size for all riders either. Handlebar shape is small beer by comparison?

cheers

Point well made.

the_twin
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby the_twin » 14 Jul 2018, 8:34am

fossala wrote:
Brucey wrote:
fossala wrote: ….. If you want flat bars it has a longer "top tube". I don't know why Moulton uses the same frame for flat bars and drops, no one else does.


well few others use the same frame size for all riders either. Handlebar shape is small beer by comparison?

cheers

Point well made.


With small wheels you don’t have the problem of toe overlap of the front wheel with smaller riders. A Moulton works perfectly well with flat bars or drops. With flat bars you are very likely choosing a more upright riding position.

If the OP is anywhere near Stratford upon Avon, the Traditional Bike Co there has a large range of models on display and you can try one out.

gazza_d
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby gazza_d » 14 Jul 2018, 8:45am

Rogthedodge wrote:Hi

I retired in June and want to start cycling again.
I stopped a few years ago due to hip problems but recently had both hips replaced.

I'm interested in the Pashley Moulton TSR 8 as I want a step over frame and plan to use it on leisure rides on canal and cycle paths.
I also have limited storage space for the bike.
Please can anyone advise if this is a good bike or if there are better alternatives.

Many thanks


The Moulton TSR is an excellent bike. The step over height and overall length of a Moulton TSR is about the same as the 20" folder the wife has (which is a Dahon/tern designed frame). the overall length is a couple of inches shorter than a bike with conventional sized wheels

They of course have the suspension which eliminates much of the harsh ride from small wheels, and although quicker handling than a large wheeled road bikes, they are nowhere as twitchy as a folding bike.

They're great on mixed surfaces, unless it is loose like sand, mud or deep gravel which tends to bog the smaller wheels down quicker. Most of my cycling is done on off road routes varying from tarmac to forest trail.

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fossala
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby fossala » 14 Jul 2018, 8:47am

the_twin wrote:
fossala wrote:
Brucey wrote:
well few others use the same frame size for all riders either. Handlebar shape is small beer by comparison?

cheers

Point well made.


With small wheels you don’t have the problem of toe overlap of the front wheel with smaller riders. A Moulton works perfectly well with flat bars or drops. With flat bars you are very likely choosing a more upright riding position.

If the OP is anywhere near Stratford upon Avon, the Traditional Bike Co there has a large range of models on display and you can try one out.

I disagree. The top tube length isn't about toe overlap it's about reach. Longer stems change how bikes feel. There's a reason that bicycles come in multiple sizes. But as I said, I'm lucky as space frames fit me with drop bars and normal length stems.

the_twin
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby the_twin » 14 Jul 2018, 9:48am

Hence the comment about a more upright position being likely to be desired with flat bars. If you want to get stretched out and aero I'd imagine most people will use drops, despite the marketers trying to sell flat bar racing bikes a few years ago. In practical terms a range of people will be able to achieve a comfortable riding position on a Moulton for a variety of uses, which is one of its advantages.

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fossala
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby fossala » 14 Jul 2018, 10:16am

the_twin wrote:Hence the comment about a more upright position being likely to be desired with flat bars. If you want to get stretched out and aero I'd imagine most people will use drops, despite the marketers trying to sell flat bar racing bikes a few years ago. In practical terms a range of people will be able to achieve a comfortable riding position on a Moulton for a variety of uses, which is one of its advantages.

Due to the design most people can fit on a Moulton but I wouldn't say the size is optimal. The f frame was designed for flat bars, hence the longer
"top tube". I sometimes think people who own Moulton bikes (I do) are in denial and almost act like a religious zealot. It has so many downside people turn a blind eye to them. I say this while looking at my AM Moulton that lives in my bedroom...

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Mick F
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby Mick F » 14 Jul 2018, 10:31am

I agree.
My TSR has many many downsides, but it's still fun to ride.

I tend to use it for shorter rides as it's a slow bike. Not just the weight. I've calculated that I lose one minute per mile compared to my Mercian so I don't worry about getting a move-on when riding it. It makes a relaxing ride rather than a fast and furious one.
Mick F. Cornwall

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fossala
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Re: Moulton tsr 8

Postby fossala » 14 Jul 2018, 10:42am

Mick F wrote:I agree.
My TSR has many many downsides, but it's still fun to ride.

I tend to use it for shorter rides as it's a slow bike. Not just the weight. I've calculated that I lose one minute per mile compared to my Mercian so I don't worry about getting a move-on when riding it. It makes a relaxing ride rather than a fast and furious one.

I think any bike has it's positives and negatives, it's about working out what is important to you and finding the bicycle that has that. For me I find most upright bikes uncomfortable, the two that I have found that are ok are Moultons and fat bikes both employ suspension (4" tyres on the fat bike) to increase comfort. For me the many problems Moultons have are worth it. Saying this I haven't rode my Moulton in months because I've found something more comfortable and just as fast but that is for another thread.