Visitors

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Cugel
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Re: Visitors

Postby Cugel » 26 Sep 2018, 9:38am

Vorpal wrote:My uncle had a battle against the squirrels with the his bird feeders. He liked to watch the birds, and after he retired, this became one of his main past times.

But the squirrels!

He modified some baking tins with teflon coating to use as shields. They hung above the the hung feeders, and below the ones on the poles. That worked in a way. The squirrels then jumped from a bush to the feeders. My uncle trimmed the bushes back further and further, so that the squirrels were jumping almost 3 metres to get to one of the feeders. He ended up taking the bushes out and planting some further away, and wrapping the trunks of a couple of trees in sheet metal at the heights from where they could leap to the feeders. They kept trying, anyway, so he eventually put peanuts out for them. Between being fed well enough and making the feeders hard enough to get to, they mostly left the feeders alone.

This became years' long saga.


Control freaks will find various ways to exercise their compulsions. They do get carried away sometimes. There are some extreme examples, even worse that squirrel haters. Take Trump, who hates everything and everybody so that his control freakery has become a danger to us all.

Perhaps he too began with squirrel-hating? It seems a common psycho-affliction, judging by this thread.

Cugel

mercalia
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Re: Visitors

Postby mercalia » 26 Sep 2018, 9:44am

661-Pete wrote:With us, I'm sorry to say, it's been not squirrels .... but rats.

We originally had a wooden bird feeder, on a wooden post. The rats had no trouble at all shinning up the post. So we changed it for a metal feeder, on a slender metal pole. I think you can guess how long it took the rats to figure out how to climb the metal pole..... :(

Sometimes I think, if we exterminated Grey Squirrels, rather than let the Red Squirrels back in, it'd merely provide a new ecological niche for Rattus norvegicus.... :evil:


grease the metal pole? use some car oil?

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al_yrpal
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Re: Visitors

Postby al_yrpal » 26 Sep 2018, 10:29am

To stop rats and squirrels climbing up the pole that supports our bird table I tied 8 long pieces of brambles with very sharp prickles onto it. Stopped them dead.

Al
Touring on a bicycle is a great way to explore and appreciate the countryside and towns you pass through. CTC gone but not forgotten!

reohn2
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Re: Visitors

Postby reohn2 » 26 Sep 2018, 10:30am

al_yrpal wrote:To stop rats and squirrels climbing up the pole that supports our bird table I tied 8 long pieces of brambles with very sharp prickles onto it. Stopped them dead.

Al

Dead you say?.....
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Cugel
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Re: Visitors

Postby Cugel » 26 Sep 2018, 12:19pm

reohn2 wrote:
al_yrpal wrote:To stop rats and squirrels climbing up the pole that supports our bird table I tied 8 long pieces of brambles with very sharp prickles onto it. Stopped them dead.

Al

Dead you say?.....


If so, they should be bottled in vinegar - prickled pickled squirrel. One could test the children's' progress at articulating words by getting them to repeat the phrase 5 times, quite rapidly: "Please pick me and pack for the picnic a pot of prime prickled pickled squirrel".

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al_yrpal
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Re: Visitors

Postby al_yrpal » 26 Sep 2018, 2:34pm

No, is previously stated if Jeremy's policies drag us down that far that we are reduced to eating sq'rls I would follow the practice that they have adopted in Louisiana and enjoy them lightly flame grilled on a stick…

https://youtu.be/lYasyRjLbFU

Al :D
Touring on a bicycle is a great way to explore and appreciate the countryside and towns you pass through. CTC gone but not forgotten!

mercalia
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Re: Visitors

Postby mercalia » 26 Sep 2018, 5:51pm

al_yrpal wrote:No, is previously stated if Jeremy's policies drag us down that far that we are reduced to eating sq'rls I would follow the practice that they have adopted in Louisiana and enjoy them lightly flame grilled on a stick…

https://youtu.be/lYasyRjLbFU

Al :D



sound to me you are contemplating Rat Burgers & Squirrel pasties & others :lol:

hedgehog.JPG
Last edited by mercalia on 26 Sep 2018, 6:12pm, edited 2 times in total.

reohn2
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Re: Visitors

Postby reohn2 » 26 Sep 2018, 6:04pm

al_yrpal wrote:No, is previously stated if Jeremy's policies drag us down that far that we are reduced to eating sq'rls I would follow the practice that they have adopted in Louisiana and enjoy them lightly flame grilled on a stick…

https://youtu.be/lYasyRjLbFU

Al :D

The current government are already causing such May-hem for the lower "classes" already, perhaps a more center based government such a Labour may make a change for the better YVMV :) .
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Freddie
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Re: Visitors

Postby Freddie » 27 Sep 2018, 11:24pm

One species, the squirrel speci...wait a minute...now I'm hearing the greys are invasive, non-native and driving the reds out - this stuff sounds like it is straight out of the NSF (National Squirrel Front) handbook, who says the reds own the British Isles anyway :roll:

mercalia
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Re: Visitors

Postby mercalia » 28 Sep 2018, 12:04am

Freddie wrote:One species, the squirrel speci...wait a minute...now I'm hearing the greys are invasive, non-native and driving the reds out - this stuff sounds like it is straight out of the NSF (National Squirrel Front) handbook, who says the reds own the British Isles anyway :roll:


yes the reds are like the britons/celts who were kicked out by the angles/saxons/vikings/romans/etc they have now been here 150 years or so? long enough to me to be called "native"

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661-Pete
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Re: Visitors

Postby 661-Pete » 28 Sep 2018, 9:20am

Same is true of the European rabbit. Not 'native' to the British Isles; I believe the official view (some may disagree) is that it was introduced by the Romans, as a food animal. But today rabbits play an essential role in maintaining habitats like Downland (which, in the absence of grazing, would revert to forest). I wouldn't like to see them exterminated (myxo nearly finished them off - when I was a kid I hardly knew what a rabbit looked like - but not quite).

The European hare, on the other hand, is believed to be native to Britain. Far less often seen than the rabbit, although I don't think this is a case of one species driving out another. A pity really - an encounter with a hare (not being chased by dogs) makes one feel good....
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).

PDQ Mobile
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Re: Visitors

Postby PDQ Mobile » 28 Sep 2018, 9:46am

I do not share this love of the rabbit.
It is a pretty destructive beasty if one farms or gardens. Though quite tasty.

The hare continues to thrive,albeit sparsely, on the Hill of the Hares.
Is less of a problem than the Rabbit, breeds more slowly and does not burrow. Can still be destructive in the garden though. A Fort Knox approach works but costs money.
A day or so old young leveret is probably the most beautiful thing in creation!
((A little voice comes to me across the decades.
"Pleeease, can we keep it"!))

That there are some "alien" invaders that would have been better left in their own ecology is, I think, undeniable.
Japanese Knotweed and Varroa Mites for a
starters.

kwackers
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Re: Visitors

Postby kwackers » 28 Sep 2018, 10:16am

PDQ Mobile wrote:I do not share this love of the rabbit.
It is a pretty destructive beasty if one farms or gardens.

What isn't when you provide it with an all you can eat banquet and remove most of the predators because apparently they're also destructive...

It's still got a long way to go before it matches the destructiveness of man though.


I found half a visitor buried in a border yesterday. (Always the bottom half! Why don't they eat that bit?)
I reckon that's the local fox, the local cats are too lazy to bother burying anything.

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Cugel
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Re: Visitors

Postby Cugel » 28 Sep 2018, 4:23pm

kwackers wrote:
PDQ Mobile wrote:I do not share this love of the rabbit.
It is a pretty destructive beasty if one farms or gardens.

What isn't when you provide it with an all you can eat banquet and remove most of the predators because apparently they're also destructive...

It's still got a long way to go before it matches the destructiveness of man though.

......


Bring back the sabre-toofed tiggers and also the dire wolves. Why not some bad-tempered bears too? These will help reduce the plague of humans ruining everything with their stinkin' death trap cars and queer chemicals!

Of course, I don't want any of the above in my back garden. They can, though, be put in to some of the local parks, especially when the yobboes come out with their attack dogs for a "walk". I believe that dire wolves enjoy the taste of attack-dog; possibly also that of yobboe.

Cugel

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661-Pete
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Re: Visitors

Postby 661-Pete » 29 Sep 2018, 11:14am

PDQ Mobile wrote:I do not share this love of the rabbit.
It is a pretty destructive beasty if one farms or gardens. Though quite tasty.
I didn't say, I love rabbits. Quite the opposite, I think they're a pest too.

But I was making the point that they're here to stay, and they have helped to shape our present-day landscape as we know it. Keeping the numbers down is fine (which is why we need more foxes out in the countryside, rather than foraging rubbish bins in the cities). Totally exterminating the rabbit population, on the other hand, is not on.
Suppose that this room is a lift. The support breaks and down we go with ever-increasing velocity.
Let us pass the time by performing physical experiments...
--- Arthur Eddington (creator of the Eddington Number).