Ten mental health tips

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mercalia
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby mercalia » 6 Apr 2019, 6:54pm

Mick F wrote:We're getting a puppy! :D
Collecting him on Wednesday next week. Went round to visit him again today.

He'll be our fifth Border Collie. First one was in 1974 a year after we married.


Well just make sure the Bodmin Beast dont get it

brynpoeth
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby brynpoeth » 6 Apr 2019, 7:05pm

Audax67 wrote:Get a dog.

Good for physical health too cos it needs to be taken walking

Might a cat be good for mental health, in a different way maybe? :wink:
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Mick F
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Mick F » 6 Apr 2019, 7:20pm

mercalia wrote:
Mick F wrote:We're getting a puppy! :D
Collecting him on Wednesday next week. Went round to visit him again today.

He'll be our fifth Border Collie. First one was in 1974 a year after we married.


Well just make sure the Bodmin Beast dont get it
We have three cats, but we've not seen one of them since Thursday.
She's a hunter and a wanderer, so she could be out hunting and wandering ............ hopefully.

PS:
Just been corrected.
She was back yesterday morning with a young rabbit to eat.
Not seen her since then, and not at all today as yet.
Mick F. Cornwall

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100%JR
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby 100%JR » 6 Apr 2019, 7:36pm

Audax67 wrote:Get a dog.

THE best thing we've ever done.We got our Cocker Spaniel 18 months ago after years of me trying to persuade the wife 8)
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Freddie
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Freddie » 6 Apr 2019, 7:49pm

Cugel wrote:Ha ha - I wear my heart on my sleeve and often on my foreheed, so it gets noticed more. Where I was brought up this was normal, since the honest expression of how one feels was regarded as the basis of all other honest behaviours.
That doesn't surprise me. Where were you brought up?

Cugel wrote: But I suppose ....

Paranoia strikes deep
Into your life it will creep
It starts when you're always afraid
Step out of line, the men come and take you away


Buffalo Springfield from their ditty "For What It's Worth".

The people you trust to give you good advice are often the people who will just give you a pet and a stroke, as they agree with your angst. This is known as "staying in my bubble". Personally I prefer to have my bubble burst as this often relieves the pressure.

FInally, here is some advice that might burst your anxiety-bubble. You've got to get over this (feeling) sometime so why not now?

Cugel
You seem to keep bringing fear and now paranoia into discussions where there is no real need to. I am not a particularly anxious person, I find those who tell you their every stress and worry are usually rather more anxious, as a rule.

With respect to the bubble thing, I don't mean one should seek out those that pander, but those that are wise and dependable, and they are typically few and far between. One wise, trustworthy friend is worth more than any number of reluctant, disinterested consolers.

Anyway, stoicism is a useful quality and telling deep feelings to all and sundry just isn't particularly wise, especially for a man I'd say. It just makes one come over as needy and unstable, which I think many see as a rather unattractive trait and are likely, over time, to start to give a man short shrift because of it.

PDQ Mobile
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby PDQ Mobile » 6 Apr 2019, 9:12pm

Cugel wrote:* Avoid debt unless it's limited, controlled and well within your foreseeable means.
* Never gamble. Even a raffle is mentally dangerous to one's acceptance of reality.
* Consumerism is unavoidable but consuming slowly will only make you mad slowly.
* Don't regard driving (or cycling) as a competition unless it really is one (policed by commissars or marshals).
* Eschew the climbing of greasy poles of every kind, especially those needing you to dislodge the other climbers.
* Don't accept who you are if your reputation is "that nutter". Change for the better is possible.
* Become really good at things. Competance is a mental medicine. Incompetance is a symptom of impending mental disintegration.
* Avoid potted ideologies of every kind in favour of agile pragmatism.



Hmm but:-

Also avoid saving, as lack of interest or negative interest will make you mad.

And yet a small flutter that pays off can be surprisingly lifting.

Consume moderately and go mad just after you die.

Always regard driving and cycling as competitive- winning is so much fun and requires so much skill!

Rock climbing and alpine mountaineering, while rather dangerous are quite character building and can be beneficial to
mental wellbeing

"That nutter" is a little hard, but "genuine characters are becoming few and far between" (as I was recently assured!) before being given a kindly bit of assistance. So there may be some advantages?

Competence is laudable but in very short supply nationally IMV; the alternative is:-
"Busy doin' nothin', workin' the whole day through, trying to find lots of things not to do", can be surprisingly pleasant in the right surroundings. Not at all bad for mental health.

With the potted ideologies bit I agree. Though belief in something helps some people, I think that's a given.

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Cugel
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Cugel » 6 Apr 2019, 10:13pm

brynpoeth wrote:
Audax67 wrote:Get a dog.

Good for physical health too cos it needs to be taken walking

Might a cat be good for mental health, in a different way maybe? :wink:


Yess indeed. A cat is alien and teaches a human that there is something more himportant that being a human. A pussybeast indicates that there are different perspectives - perhaps even different dimensions. After all, each cat knows itself to be the centre of the universe, which probably requires as many dimensions as there are cats!

Myself, I enjoy watching a cat tease a dawg. Up on some wall or other dog-unassailable perch, mocking the dawg as it yaps and pivots with frustration, perhaps even reaching down to impart a lightning cat paw-strike to the sensitive conk of the yapper.

I intend to be a cat in my next life. Or maybe a collie with a slave or two.

Cugel

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Cugel
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Cugel » 6 Apr 2019, 10:25pm

Freddie wrote:
Cugel wrote:Ha ha - I wear my heart on my sleeve and often on my foreheed, so it gets noticed more. Where I was brought up this was normal, since the honest expression of how one feels was regarded as the basis of all other honest behaviours.
That doesn't surprise me. Where were you brought up?

Cugel wrote: But I suppose ....

Paranoia strikes deep
Into your life it will creep
It starts when you're always afraid
Step out of line, the men come and take you away


Buffalo Springfield from their ditty "For What It's Worth".

The people you trust to give you good advice are often the people who will just give you a pet and a stroke, as they agree with your angst. This is known as "staying in my bubble". Personally I prefer to have my bubble burst as this often relieves the pressure.

FInally, here is some advice that might burst your anxiety-bubble. You've got to get over this (feeling) sometime so why not now?

Cugel
You seem to keep bringing fear and now paranoia into discussions where there is no real need to. I am not a particularly anxious person, I find those who tell you their every stress and worry are usually rather more anxious, as a rule.

With respect to the bubble thing, I don't mean one should seek out those that pander, but those that are wise and dependable, and they are typically few and far between. One wise, trustworthy friend is worth more than any number of reluctant, disinterested consolers.

Anyway, stoicism is a useful quality and telling deep feelings to all and sundry just isn't particularly wise, especially for a man I'd say. It just makes one come over as needy and unstable, which I think many see as a rather unattractive trait and are likely, over time, to start to give a man short shrift because of it.


Hee hee - you get better and better! ~:-)

I was thrown out of a crack in The Earth in the region of Tyneside, where men are men but still cry quite a lot, even in public.

My worries are soon deflated by telling all and sundry about them. Often they heave a sigh of relief and mention that they previously though they were the only one...... A worry shared ceases to be a worry.

Who judges that those you confide in are "wise and dependable"? You do! This may be a flawed procedure.

Stoicism is acceptance of what-is (amongst other attitudes) rather than suppression of one's angsty wishful thunks that things were otherwise. "Needy and unstable" is for lads that cling to various certainties with their hard&fasts rather than lads who are honest about their feelings. Of course, some deal with the difficulties of life by supressing all feelings until they don't really have any, especially sympathy. They substitute the aforementioned certainties, which all must agree with or else be judged unmanly. :-)

Cugel of the unstiff lip.

Freddie
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Freddie » 6 Apr 2019, 10:29pm

You are Russell Brand and I claim my £10.

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Cugel
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Cugel » 6 Apr 2019, 10:39pm

PDQ Mobile wrote:
Cugel wrote:* Avoid debt unless it's limited, controlled and well within your foreseeable means.
* Never gamble. Even a raffle is mentally dangerous to one's acceptance of reality.
* Consumerism is unavoidable but consuming slowly will only make you mad slowly.
* Don't regard driving (or cycling) as a competition unless it really is one (policed by commissars or marshals).
* Eschew the climbing of greasy poles of every kind, especially those needing you to dislodge the other climbers.
* Don't accept who you are if your reputation is "that nutter". Change for the better is possible.
* Become really good at things. Competance is a mental medicine. Incompetance is a symptom of impending mental disintegration.
* Avoid potted ideologies of every kind in favour of agile pragmatism.



Hmm but:-

Also avoid saving, as lack of interest or negative interest will make you mad.


Save in the Mutual as your dosh is used for proper purposes. Interest at high rates is for bludsucking parasite greedyfolk.

PDQ Mobile wrote:And yet a small flutter that pays off can be surprisingly lifting.


Ha ha - already the unreality has a grip o' yer wishfuls.

PDQ Mobile wrote:Consume moderately and go mad just after you die.


This is impossible as there is no you after you're a dedder to go mad. Mind, your lenders might be hopping and cursing. :-)

PDQ Mobile wrote:Always regard driving and cycling as competitive- winning is so much fun and requires so much skill!


Losing often happens, as in losing a leg, arm, both or your mentals, as the other car minces your parts.

PDQ Mobile wrote:Rock climbing and alpine mountaineering, while rather dangerous are quite character building and can be beneficial to
mental wellbeing


Agreed. The greasy pole has none of those virtues, especially when a better pole-climber stands on your face.

PDQ Mobile wrote:"That nutter" is a little hard, but "genuine characters are becoming few and far between" (as I was recently assured!) before being given a kindly bit of assistance. So there may be some advantages?


There is a spectrum from "lovable eccentric" to "raving swivel-eyed violent would-be ethno-cleansing nutter". I was referring to the latter.

PDQ Mobile wrote:Competence is laudable but in very short supply nationally IMV; the alternative is:-
"Busy doin' nothin', workin' the whole day through, trying to find lots of things not to do", can be surprisingly pleasant in the right surroundings. Not at all bad for mental health.


Troo, troo - lily of the field and all that. On the other hand, to be busy doing nothing in a successful fashion requires it's own set of competances, including an imaginative range of excuses and their convincing delivery.

PDQ Mobile wrote:With the potted ideologies bit I agree. Though belief in something helps some people, I think that's a given.


Depends on the belief. I refer you to the above-mentioned raving swivel-eyed violent would-be ethno-cleansing nutter.

Cugel, not mad, with several certificates from various Doctors of Loon to prove it!

brynpoeth
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby brynpoeth » 7 Apr 2019, 5:15am

Talking about one's feelings:
A problem shared is a problem doubled. Or halved?
..
TEA mental health tips? :wink:
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Cugel
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Cugel » 7 Apr 2019, 9:54am

Freddie wrote:You are Russell Brand and I claim my £10.


Who?

Cugel, keeping his ten quid.

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Pastychomper
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Pastychomper » 9 Apr 2019, 10:33am

brynpoeth wrote:Talking about one's feelings:
A problem shared is a problem doubled. Or halved?
..
TEA mental health tips? :wink:

As one with a history of not talking about feelings, I can see the wisdom in advice to talk about them more. "More" being different to "incessantly".

Moderation in all things (as we say in the nuclear industry). Well, nearly all things. Moderation should be moderated too.
Everyone's ghast should get a good flabbering now and then.
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Tangled Metal
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby Tangled Metal » 9 Apr 2019, 2:20pm

Keeping sabbath, shabbat or shabbos? Totally disagree. Why should anyone feel the need to sit around thinking of a creation myth? Better to be out doing something more useful instead.

Mountain climbing. Try whitewater kayaking. Much better IMHO. Total relaxation through total concentration. Or you die in some stopper. I always preferred total concentration. It's slightly funny that as physically tired as you might be through any activity, when you have to completely concentrate on the activity to keep safe you get to another level of tiredness. Physical tiredness and mental tiredness. The latter is the one you most want for mental health IMHO. If your mind is played out for the day you can't worry about anything. It's like the thousand yard stare but without the scars of the firefight to get over. Never having been in army it combat that's probably an inaccurate comment.

Seriously mentally tired through the combination of physical and mental exertion is good for your mental health. Put it this way, you can't brood over anything if you're too tired to think.

Opening up to people is good, opening up to the wrong people is bad.

It's like that TV ad where a guy is on stage with everyone he has ever met in the audience. He says hands up if we've... Then he gives a few criteria until iirc something about hands up if you've seen me cry. The ten to twenty hands still raised then come down and they chat as true friends should.

Basically humans have a set number of acquaintances they remember, friends even, but it's only a small number who really have your interests held as strongly as their own. IMHO a true friend is healing if you open up to them. They're hard to find and I find them even harder to keep. That then leaves just my family. Ever tried to be honest to your parents? Let's just say lecture time!

gbnz
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Re: Ten mental health tips

Postby gbnz » 9 Apr 2019, 2:55pm

Tangled Metal wrote:Keeping sabbath, shabbat or shabbos? Totally disagree. Why should anyone feel the need to sit around thinking of a creation myth? Better to be out doing something more useful ............ It's slightly funny that as physically tired as you might be through any activity, when you have to completely concentrate on the activity to keep safe you get to another level of tiredness..

Seriously mentally tired through the combination of physical and mental exertion is good for your mental health. Put it this way, you can't brood over anything if you're too tired to think.!


Have to admit I'd agree.

Having had a fairly .........months, physical exercise always works. And that quick 250 odd miles through the Dales, Lakes, Pennines weekend before last, definitely worked, incredible spirits were souring throughout! (Nb. Though it was Wednesday before I could do any cardio!).

Anyway, only had two hours down the gym so far, just popping down to see if the pools available for a couple of hundred lengths (NB. Some people say I do too much :roll: )