Bike eye frame mirror

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
roberts8
Posts: 260
Joined: 20 May 2011, 9:14pm
Location: Surrey

Bike eye frame mirror

Postby roberts8 » 22 Jun 2019, 8:42am

Off on Friday for a short trip to France and getting older looking over my left shoulder is a bit restricted so I am thinking of fitting the above as they can be moved left or right so would seem to work anywhere, do they?

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Mick F
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Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby Mick F » 22 Jun 2019, 8:51am

I thought about getting one, and considered it for a while pretending that I had one and if it would be ok for me.
I couldn't grasp the idea that I would be able to see anything as when I pedal, my knees almost brush the top tube, therefore I wouldn't be able to see through my legs.

I bought one of these.
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/accessories ... r-end-fit/

It could easily be transferred left/right, and if you wanted you could fit two.
This is what it looks like.
B+M Mirror1.jpg
Mick F. Cornwall

dim
Posts: 90
Joined: 12 May 2019, 5:59pm

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby dim » 22 Jun 2019, 8:57am

I'm looking closely at the rearviz mirror .... it's like a large wristwatch:

Image

iandriver
Posts: 2172
Joined: 10 Jun 2009, 2:09pm
Location: Cambridge.

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby iandriver » 22 Jun 2019, 9:54am

Mick F wrote:I thought about getting one, and considered it for a while pretending that I had one and if it would be ok for me.
I couldn't grasp the idea that I would be able to see anything as when I pedal, my knees almost brush the top tube, therefore I wouldn't be able to see through my legs.

I bought one of these.
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/accessories ... r-end-fit/

It could easily be transferred left/right, and if you wanted you could fit two.
This is what it looks like.B+M Mirror1.jpg


If you're using dropped bars, +1 for this. I've used various mirrors over the years and this is by far the superior model. A good clear view and stays stable at speed. Very easy to adjust on the fly.
Supporter of the A10 corridor cycling campaign serving Royston to Cambridge http://a10corridorcycle.com. Never knew gardening secateurs were an essential part of the on bike tool kit until I took up campaigning.....

Eyebrox
Posts: 253
Joined: 5 Aug 2015, 8:56pm
Location: Ayrshire

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby Eyebrox » 23 Jun 2019, 12:34am

I use the Bike Eye. It's not perfect but works adequately once you get into the routine. The pluses are - it's easy to fit and easy to re-fit; it comes with a plastic key which makes tightening the unit very simple; the reflective plate is large and this allows greater viewing area; it doesn't vibrate or move around as a bar-fitted mirror would; it's rigid plastic and yields if the bike falls against a wall. The minuses are - it can be difficult to target your ideal viewing area (tiny hand movement on the mirror can cause big change in focus), your knee bumps it out of position when getting on and off bike; it won't see clearly past wide saddlebags; realigning the direction of the mirror often needs to be done at crucial times when traffic are around you. It takes time to master the manoeuvring procedure.

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Paulatic
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Location: 24 Hours from Lands End

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby Paulatic » 23 Jun 2019, 7:16am

dim wrote:I'm looking closely at the rearviz mirror .... it's like a large wristwatch:

g]

Every time you move your hand you’ll need to move the mirror surely. Or ride with your hand/ wrist position in the same position all the time.
The B&M is the best IME I’ve it fitted to both drop barred bikes.
Whatever I am, wherever I am, this is me. This is my life

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dim
Posts: 90
Joined: 12 May 2019, 5:59pm

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby dim » 23 Jun 2019, 5:49pm

Paulatic wrote:
dim wrote:I'm looking closely at the rearviz mirror .... it's like a large wristwatch:

g]

Every time you move your hand you’ll need to move the mirror surely. Or ride with your hand/ wrist position in the same position all the time.
The B&M is the best IME I’ve it fitted to both drop barred bikes.


I think that you you are correct, however, I always ride on the hoods, so my hand position always remains the same ... I also have the Garmin Varia radar unit, and with a quick glance, I'm hoping that this mirror will allow me to see what's approaching (a huge Oshkosh lorry or a guy on a motorbike etc)....

I have drop bars with bar end shifters, so I cannot use the mirrors that connect to the handle bar ends

If the rearviz mirror is crap, I will look at other alternatives such as the hood mount mirrors ... I really want a mirror for my touring bike

roberts8
Posts: 260
Joined: 20 May 2011, 9:14pm
Location: Surrey

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby roberts8 » 24 Jun 2019, 4:08pm

My wife has just brought a wrist mirror as she uses straight bars but has not yet tried it. I tried it on my touring bike with drops and it definitely does not work at all for me as I do change hand positions quite often. Back to a bike eye or bar ends.

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andrew_s
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Location: Gloucestershire

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby andrew_s » 25 Jun 2019, 10:13am

The Bike Eye mirror fits at the top of the down tube.
The big problem with this location is that your view to the rear is obstructed by your legs. Yes, you can stop pedalling and cock your leg out to the side, but that limits the use of the mirror to specific checks, rather than just keeping an eye on what's happening behind, and the leg out to the side obstructs the view of anything closer. Plus, of course, there's the matter of any luggage etc. that may also obstruct the view (saddlebag, rack pack, coat).

With flat bars, a bar end mirror will work well.
The Mountain Mirrycle is one of the better versions, and can be set so that it both doesn't move in use, and can still be pivoted out of the way for parking.

For drop bars, the only really good mirror is (again) the (road) Mirrycle, which is even better than bar end mirrors on flat bars, but is, unfortunately, only available for some versions of the Shimano STI lever, or the original version for old-style non-aero brake levers with the cable out the top (the latter version can sometimes be bodged* to fit other levers).
I find that on drop bars, any bar end mirror is behind my arm when I'm in my normal riding position, which limits use to specific checks rather than keeping an eye on what's going on behind (besides which, my bar ends are occupied by gear shifters). Having said that, bar end is probably the best relatively easy location.

* Note to myself - since I've just replaced a damaged RL520 lever, I'll have a go at bodging my old Mirrycle Original to fit.

Shuggie
Posts: 111
Joined: 21 Aug 2009, 7:38pm

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby Shuggie » 26 Jun 2019, 10:34am

andrew_s wrote:The Bike Eye mirror fits at the top of the down tube.
The big problem with this location is that your view to the rear is obstructed by your legs. Yes, you can stop pedalling and cock your leg out to the side, but that limits the use of the mirror to specific checks, rather than just keeping an eye on what's happening behind, and the leg out to the side obstructs the view of anything closer. Plus, of course, there's the matter of any luggage etc. that may also obstruct the view (saddlebag, rack pack, coat).



I have Bike Eye on 3 of my bikes and have no problem at all using them whilst pedalling, and my thigh naturally runs parallel to the frame. Occasionally I may swing my knee out 1-2 cm just to get a wider view but that is no hardship. The reasons I like the Bike Eye are that it gives a good and very stable view without distortion, and whilst I may occasionally knock it it can be easily corrected whilst moving, and its position on the Bike protects it from being bashed unlike most bar mirrors.

IME with luggage, a Carradice Zip Roll is no issue, my Pendle can take up the top part of the mirror but it is easily adjusted on the move to maximise the field of view, however the Bike Eye is of no use if you’ve got a rear rack +/- panniers.

Hugh

HobbesOnTour
Posts: 367
Joined: 20 Feb 2017, 5:12pm

Re: Bike eye frame mirror

Postby HobbesOnTour » 26 Jun 2019, 5:05pm

dim wrote:
Paulatic wrote:
dim wrote:I'm looking closely at the rearviz mirror .... it's like a large wristwatch:

g]

Every time you move your hand you’ll need to move the mirror surely. Or ride with your hand/ wrist position in the same position all the time.
The B&M is the best IME I’ve it fitted to both drop barred bikes.


I think that you you are correct, however, I always ride on the hoods, so my hand position always remains the same ... I also have the Garmin Varia radar unit, and with a quick glance, I'm hoping that this mirror will allow me to see what's approaching (a huge Oshkosh lorry or a guy on a motorbike etc)....

I have drop bars with bar end shifters, so I cannot use the mirrors that connect to the handle bar ends

If the rearviz mirror is crap, I will look at other alternatives such as the hood mount mirrors ... I really want a mirror for my touring bike


I have a rearviz mirror that I got specifically for touring.
It feels a bit heavy initially (but I'm not used to wearing a watch) but is surprisingly easy to use.
Yes, when you move your hand it changes what you see, but it is quite easy to adjust on the fly. It rotates and can change angle.
It also means that a simple twitch of the wrist can greatly expand your rearview.
The strap is comfortable, but the hard plastic frame can become a bit uncomfortable when worn for a long time. It is a bit bulky, but I think there are more slimline models released since. For touring & camping, it can be handy to have a mirror that is easy to move.

I became so fond of a mirror I got one of these for my commuter https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B011DL ... UTF8&psc=1 and I find that very handy too. Flatbar use.