Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

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Samuel D
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Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby Samuel D » 30 Aug 2019, 12:35pm

I like shaped-beam lamps both to get more light on the road (rather than the sky) and to not blind oncoming traffic. However, when descending, the angles conspire to shorten the beam fairly drastically around corners.

A simple mechanical device to allow flipping between two angles on the mount would fix this for empty roads, which is the usual case for me when descending in pitch darkness. A more sophisticated device might track the steering angle and adjust vertical tilt to suit.

I realise that such a device would require competent set-up and use, or traffic would be blinded anyway. But accurate set-up is already necessary for shaped-beam headlamps (and too many of them don’t get it, usually pointing down too far).

Has anyone come across such a mount for sale?

AndyK
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby AndyK » 30 Aug 2019, 12:59pm

Not come across one for sale, but a random thought: I wonder if you could cannibalise an old grip shifter to do this? Simply clamp the light's handlebar mounting bracket onto the gripshift grip and you've got a nice ratchetted multi-angle mount. It ought to work if the light's not too heavy.

slowster
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby slowster » 30 Aug 2019, 1:24pm

I think that many UK mountainbikers who ride a lot in the dark use a combination of a light mounted on the handlebar with a smaller helmet mounted light, of which I think the most highly rated and popular is the Exposure Joystick. Obviously it's a lot more expensive than a bracket and it requires you to wear a helmet, but I think that it might solve your problem. I think using two light sources pointing at the ground from different angles/elevation can also improve the perception of hazards like potholes (that improved perception is one of the main reasons why I think MTBers use a helmet light in addition to their main handlebar light).

Exposure Lights are not cheap, but if you can wait there are usually some good discounts on them during the Black Friday deals, e.g. at Evans Cycles.

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mjr
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby mjr » 30 Aug 2019, 3:36pm

Another option would be to use an MTB floodlight that switches on/off quite easily, which would seem like a more direct implementation of a full beam. However, I don't MTB, so can't suggest one.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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PH
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby PH » 30 Aug 2019, 3:50pm

mjr wrote:Another option would be to use an MTB floodlight that switches on/off quite easily, which would seem like a more direct implementation of a full beam.

I've been looking for one for a while, not constantly, but every few years when I change lights, to supplement dynamo lighting and use as a high beam. I haven't fond a decent light that doesn't require the button to be held to turn it off. I've settled for Nightrider lights which are on a ratcheted swivel bracket, I can easily aim it into the hedge rather than the road, it's also useful for reading signposts on the other side of the road. The bracket is also loose enough to swivel up and down with thumb pressure without being so lose that it'll move on it's own.
I was reading this week of a PBP bike where the L/H STI wasn't required for gear changing and had been adapted to change the light angle, it's a pity no photos, I'd have liked to see how.

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mjr
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby mjr » 30 Aug 2019, 4:19pm

PH wrote:I haven't fond a decent light that doesn't require the button to be held to turn it off.

Does anyone know if any with an external battery pack go out if you put a switch in the battery lead? And if they come back on when power is reconnected?
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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freiston
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby freiston » 30 Aug 2019, 5:34pm

You could use a torch with a tail-cap switch that allows a momentary press rather than a full click-press, or you could replace the tail cap of a suitable torch with a remote pressure switch cap. I sometimes use a Fenix PD35 Tactical (I hate the "Tactical" part of the name) mounted to my handlebars with a simple rubber block/velcro strap mount for temporary floodlighting (I very rarely use it on the bike but it does give a blinding/dazzling full beam effect). There is a remote pressure switch cap available for it too:

https://www.myfenix.co.uk/fenix-pd35-tactical

https://www.myfenix.co.uk/fenix-remote- ... itch-ar102
Disclaimer: Treat what I say with caution and if possible, wait for someone with more knowledge and experience to contribute. ;)

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gaz
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby gaz » 30 Aug 2019, 6:51pm

Philips Activeride might suit, cut off and full beam in one lamp. I'd be tempted to read more reviews before commiting and research likely battery performance of a NOS item especially at that price.
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Samuel D
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby Samuel D » 31 Aug 2019, 10:17am

That Philips looks interesting. Perhaps there is or will be an equivalent Spanninga (Spanninga bought Philips’s bicycle lighting outfit).

For me, though, I’m mainly interested in a dynamo lamp mounted at the fork crown. Kind of surprising that no-one appears to have come up with a nifty little gadget to allow flipping by, say, 4 degrees. Perhaps the market would be even smaller than I imagine.

Thanks for the comments, all.

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Cunobelin
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby Cunobelin » 31 Aug 2019, 10:58am

I use the B&M Ixon IQ for the beam pattern.

Image

I am mostly road so vibration is not a massive issue.

I found it possible to set the tension on the handlebar fitting so that there was sufficient friction to prevent movement when riding, but sufficient to allow movement by hand to raise or lower the beam

Takes a little trial and error, but works fine for me

LuckyLuke
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby LuckyLuke » 1 Sep 2019, 8:03pm

Hi, I'very not tried this personally, but the blurb suggests it allows one to make adjustments on the fly.
https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop/co ... ght-mount/

Samuel D
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby Samuel D » 2 Sep 2019, 8:17am

LuckyLuke wrote:Hi, I'very not tried this personally, but the blurb suggests it allows one to make adjustments on the fly.
https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop/co ... ght-mount/

Interesting. Something as simple as that with hard stops ~4 degrees apart would be nice. Even better if it could be elegantly, cheaply, and lightly made with adjustable stop locations.

stevegreen
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby stevegreen » 2 Sep 2019, 10:47am

The Busch & Mueller IQ Fly dynamo lamp is adjustable for angle. The lamp itself pivots up and down in its housing. However, it's a bit bulky (taller than many dynamo lights) and at 40 lux, not the brightest.

I found it to be an adequate light most of the time, but a bit short in reach for fast riding.

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andrew_s
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby andrew_s » 2 Sep 2019, 12:49pm

Samuel D wrote:That Philips looks interesting. Perhaps there is or will be an equivalent Spanninga (Spanninga bought Philips’s bicycle lighting outfit).

For me, though, I’m mainly interested in a dynamo lamp mounted at the fork crown. Kind of surprising that no-one appears to have come up with a nifty little gadget to allow flipping by, say, 4 degrees. Perhaps the market would be even smaller than I imagine.

My memory says that the Activeride wasn't all that well received (beam pattern not too good, as same reflector was trying to use 2 sets of LEDs in different positions for the dip/high beams), and got dropped 2 or 3 years before Philips gave up on bike lights.

Any such low/high beam dipping arrangement would be likely to be illegal in Germany. An arrangement at the fork crown behind the gear and brake cables isn't going to be anything like as quick to use as a car dipswitch.

nigelnightmare
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Re: Mount that allows front lamp to tilt on the go (dipped versus full beam)

Postby nigelnightmare » 4 Sep 2019, 2:56pm

Back in the 50's/60's there was a headlight "bracket" that adjusted to give the effect of high/low beam
My Dad had it on his "SUN" road bike.
Sorry I can't remember the make but it was definitely the mounting bracket that adjusted via a lever on the side.