Primitive Gait

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velorog
Posts: 82
Joined: 16 Apr 2011, 8:50pm
Location: East Yorkshire

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby velorog » 4 Jan 2021, 9:11am

In medieval times when our local wolds were open pasture, areas or parcels of land would be rented out to local farmers for grazing. Each parcel of land was called a gait. There is still a Gait Inn in the village of Millington. Could the fens have been put to a similar use.

Jdsk
Posts: 6054
Joined: 5 Mar 2019, 5:42pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Jdsk » 4 Jan 2021, 11:24am

Mike Sales wrote:Though you have made the mystery mundane!

It was fascinating, and it looks as if it isn't over yet.

And in the best tradition of web forums.

: - )

Jonathan

pete75
Posts: 13696
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 11:48am

Mike Sales wrote:There is a terrace with this curious name in Gosberton, near Spalding.
There are many "Gates" in this area, but I have made no progress in accounting for this odd name.
I wonder if anyone can help?


It's in the Clough(rhymes with plough) as it's called locally. It's just the end of the village where the Primitive Methodist chapel was or so I've been told. I suppose since the coming together of the Primitives and Wesleyans in the 1920s it should just be called Gait now. As well as it's current meaning gait is also an an old spelling of gate and an obsolete term for a chunk of land. Could have been a bit of land someone gave to provide rent income for the chapel.
I've a book on the history of Gosberton, the Clough and the Risegate but it doesn't mention Primitive Gait.

Mike Sales
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Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 12:16pm

pete75 wrote:
It's in the Clough(rhymes with plough) as it's called locally. It's just the end of the village where the Primitive Methodist chapel was or so I've been told. I suppose since the coming together of the Primitives and Wesleyans in the 1920s it should just be called Gait now. As well as it's current meaning gait is also an an old spelling of gate and an obsolete term for a chunk of land. Could have been a bit of land someone gave to provide rent income for the chapel.
I've a book on the history of Gosberton, the Clough and the Risegate but it doesn't mention Primitive Gait.


Thanks. The matter has already been dealt with, though.
I know the area well.
My brother, who cycles and resembles me, taught in Quadring and lived in Gosberton. I was riding near there when I was startled by a little girl cycling the other way who said, "Hello Mr. Sales."
What is your book called?

I used to ride out to Billingborough and eat my lunch by the "boiling well." A pleasant bench by the church.

Bonefishblues
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Joined: 7 Jul 2014, 9:45pm
Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Bonefishblues » 4 Jan 2021, 12:21pm

Are there lots of "Boiling Wells" in that area? I used to stay in Sleaford whilst contracting in Spalding, and a regular walk took me along the Slea to Boiling Wells Farm.

pete75
Posts: 13696
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 12:30pm

Mike Sales wrote:
pete75 wrote:
It's in the Clough(rhymes with plough) as it's called locally. It's just the end of the village where the Primitive Methodist chapel was or so I've been told. I suppose since the coming together of the Primitives and Wesleyans in the 1920s it should just be called Gait now. As well as it's current meaning gait is also an an old spelling of gate and an obsolete term for a chunk of land. Could have been a bit of land someone gave to provide rent income for the chapel.
I've a book on the history of Gosberton, the Clough and the Risegate but it doesn't mention Primitive Gait.


Thanks. The matter has already been dealt with, though.
I know the area well.
My brother, who cycles and resembles me, taught in Quadring and lived in Gosberton. I was riding near there when I was startled by a little girl cycling the other way who said, "Hello Mr. Sales."
What is your book called?

I used to ride out to Billingborough and eat my lunch by the "boiling well." A pleasant bench by the church.


Spring wells. The Drs there must have one of the most picturesque surgery locations in the country. Gosberton 1900-2000. Like a lot of villages around here they produced a history book to celebrate the millenium.

Mike Sales
Posts: 5447
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 12:35pm

Bonefishblues wrote:Are there lots of "Boiling Wells" in that area? I used to stay in Sleaford whilst contracting in Spalding, and a regular walk took me along the Slea to Boiling Wells Farm.


There is a line of them running north-south along the fen edge. They are are artesian springs produced by water from the wolds above Grantham trickling through the strata. In Billingborough a notice board gives an explanation.
I have made visiting those I can find on the map excuses for rides, but Billingborough is the finest.
Others are at Dyke (Eau Well), near Rippingale, Horbling, and Great Hale. The bourne in Bourne may be another.
I have followed that walk along the Slea.
I like to do this sort of exploring. Tracing Carr Dyke was another quest.

Mike Sales
Posts: 5447
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 12:38pm

pete75 wrote:Spring wells. The Drs there must have one of the most picturesque surgery locations in the country. Gosberton 1900-2000. Like a lot of villages around here they produced a history book to celebrate the millenium.


That's where I have eaten several lunches.
I will look out for the book.

pete75
Posts: 13696
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 12:39pm

Bonefishblues wrote:Are there lots of "Boiling Wells" in that area? I used to stay in Sleaford whilst contracting in Spalding, and a regular walk took me along the Slea to Boiling Wells Farm.


Along the B1177 on or near the 10 metre contour there are several spring line villages - they were even given as an example of the same in our Geography text book at school. Billingborough has Spring Wells and the next village along, Horbling, has a spring well.


Horbling Well

Image

Mike Sales
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Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 12:44pm

Jdsk wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:Though you have made the mystery mundane!

It was fascinating, and it looks as if it isn't over yet.

And in the best tradition of web forums.

: - )

Jonathan


Yes to both points.
But an unanswered question always attracts more interest. The Loch Ness Monster is world famous, but if the surgeon's photograph had been quickly shown to be a big fish it would have been long forgotten.

pete75
Posts: 13696
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 12:50pm

Mike Sales wrote:
Bonefishblues wrote:Are there lots of "Boiling Wells" in that area? I used to stay in Sleaford whilst contracting in Spalding, and a regular walk took me along the Slea to Boiling Wells Farm.


There is a line of them running north-south along the fen edge. They are are artesian springs produced by water from the wolds above Grantham trickling through the strata. In Billingborough a notice board gives an explanation.
I have made visiting those I can find on the map excuses for rides, but Billingborough is the finest.
Others are at Dyke (Eau Well), near Rippingale, Horbling, and Great Hale. The bourne in Bourne may be another.
I have followed that walk along the Slea.
I like to do this sort of exploring. Tracing Carr Dyke was another quest.


The Bourne one was quite powerful. A spring underneath what we called the Wellhead pond and others call St Peter's Pool formed the Bourne Eau river which joins the Glen at Tongue End. At one time the flow was powerful enough to drive three water mills within a mile of the source. It occasionally dries up now apparently because a lot of artesian water is pumped to Spalding and Boston. Bourne water was quite famous at one time and considered so good for brewing Batemans used to send a tanker to fetch water from Wrangle , the closest place to Wainfleet with a supply from Bourne.

Mike Sales
Posts: 5447
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 12:59pm

pete75 wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
Bonefishblues wrote:Are there lots of "Boiling Wells" in that area? I used to stay in Sleaford whilst contracting in Spalding, and a regular walk took me along the Slea to Boiling Wells Farm.


There is a line of them running north-south along the fen edge. They are are artesian springs produced by water from the wolds above Grantham trickling through the strata. In Billingborough a notice board gives an explanation.
I have made visiting those I can find on the map excuses for rides, but Billingborough is the finest.
Others are at Dyke (Eau Well), near Rippingale, Horbling, and Great Hale. The bourne in Bourne may be another.
I have followed that walk along the Slea.
I like to do this sort of exploring. Tracing Carr Dyke was another quest.


The Bourne one was quite powerful. A spring underneath what we called the Wellhead pond and others call St Peter's Pool formed the Bourne Eau river which joins the Glen at Tongue End. At one time the flow was powerful enough to drive three water mills within a mile of the source. It occasionally dries up now apparently because a lot of artesian water is pumped to Spalding and Boston. Bourne water was quite famous at one time and considered so good for brewing Batemans used to send a tanker to fetch water from Wrangle , the closest place to Wainfleet with a supply from Bourne.


Bourne supplied Wrangle with water?
When my father taught at Tongue End we lived there in the school house.

pete75
Posts: 13696
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 1:22pm

Mike Sales wrote:
pete75 wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
There is a line of them running north-south along the fen edge. They are are artesian springs produced by water from the wolds above Grantham trickling through the strata. In Billingborough a notice board gives an explanation.
I have made visiting those I can find on the map excuses for rides, but Billingborough is the finest.
Others are at Dyke (Eau Well), near Rippingale, Horbling, and Great Hale. The bourne in Bourne may be another.
I have followed that walk along the Slea.
I like to do this sort of exploring. Tracing Carr Dyke was another quest.


The Bourne one was quite powerful. A spring underneath what we called the Wellhead pond and others call St Peter's Pool formed the Bourne Eau river which joins the Glen at Tongue End. At one time the flow was powerful enough to drive three water mills within a mile of the source. It occasionally dries up now apparently because a lot of artesian water is pumped to Spalding and Boston. Bourne water was quite famous at one time and considered so good for brewing Batemans used to send a tanker to fetch water from Wrangle , the closest place to Wainfleet with a supply from Bourne.


Bourne supplied Wrangle with water?
When my father taught at Tongue End we lived there in the school house.


Yep. According to the brewery history website Wrangle was in the Boston Rural District Council area which piped in Bourne water. Tongue End eh? A bit wild and wooly. We used to bike down from Bourne to fish in the Glen and later I worked at Chimney Farm so got to know some of the locals. Two very pretty sisters living on Everard Rd were also an attraction.....

Mike Sales
Posts: 5447
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby Mike Sales » 4 Jan 2021, 1:34pm

pete75 wrote:
Yep. According to the brewery history website Wrangle was in the Boston Rural District Council area which piped in Bourne water. Tongue End eh? A bit wild and wooly. We used to bike down from Bourne to fish in the Glen and later I worked at Chimney Farm so got to know some of the locals. Two very pretty sisters lived on Everard Rd were also an attraction.....


Seems a long way to go for water. Ingram of Illustrated London News has a prominent statue in Boston Market Place. When he was M.P. he helped get the town a water supply, but this water came from Miningsby, to the north.

Ingram then turned his attention to what had been a longstanding bone of contention with Boston residents - the scarcity of drinking water. In 1815 water had cost a penny a bucket from water carts, and the only public pump was in Pump Square. This was served by two underground cellars, which acted as a primitive reservoir. Otherwise, people used to catch the rain as it landed on their roofs or trickled into their gutters.
Ingram formed the Boston Water Works which built a reservoir twelve miles north of the town at Miningsby, where there is a flat tableland behind Revesby Park.


After Tongue End we moved to Glenside, West Pinchbeck, where the river is a little more picturesque.

pete75
Posts: 13696
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Primitive Gait

Postby pete75 » 4 Jan 2021, 2:49pm

Mike Sales wrote:
pete75 wrote:
Yep. According to the brewery history website Wrangle was in the Boston Rural District Council area which piped in Bourne water. Tongue End eh? A bit wild and wooly. We used to bike down from Bourne to fish in the Glen and later I worked at Chimney Farm so got to know some of the locals. Two very pretty sisters lived on Everard Rd were also an attraction.....


Seems a long way to go for water. Ingram of Illustrated London News has a prominent statue in Boston Market Place. When he was M.P. he helped get the town a water supply, but this water came from Miningsby, to the north.

Ingram then turned his attention to what had been a longstanding bone of contention with Boston residents - the scarcity of drinking water. In 1815 water had cost a penny a bucket from water carts, and the only public pump was in Pump Square. This was served by two underground cellars, which acted as a primitive reservoir. Otherwise, people used to catch the rain as it landed on their roofs or trickled into their gutters.
Ingram formed the Boston Water Works which built a reservoir twelve miles north of the town at Miningsby, where there is a flat tableland behind Revesby Park.


After Tongue End we moved to Glenside, West Pinchbeck, where the river is a little more picturesque.


The water works which supply Boston and Spalding were built well after Ingram's day, early twentieth century.
Something about the Bourne Spalding supply here https://www.spaldingvoice.co.uk/feature ... ea-passes/