How do you carry big shopping?

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pete75
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by pete75 »

Jdsk wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 2:06pm Delivery by cycle courier from Westgate Oxford:
https://westgateoxford.co.uk/dropit

Jonathan
Time was when almost every grocer provided that service.
'Give me my bike, a bit of sunshine - and a stop-off for a lunchtime pint - and I'm a happy man.' - Reg Baker
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TrevA
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by TrevA »

Back in the days when we didn’t have a car, I would carry a week’s shopping on my bike in 2 big panniers and an old shopping trolley (as used by grannies!). This was strapped to the back of my rack using a couple of toe straps. I used to have to climb a 10% hill on my way home, which was a bottom gear grind with approx 40lbs of shopping on board. I did have a triple chainring which came in handy.

We do have a dog trailer now which could be pressed into service for shopping. I mostly just stick stuff in a rucksack when shopping in the town centre.
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Carlton green
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by Carlton green »

pete75 wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 2:43pm
Jdsk wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 2:06pm Delivery by cycle courier from Westgate Oxford:
https://westgateoxford.co.uk/dropit

Jonathan
Time was when almost every grocer provided that service.
Delibikes or Grocers’ bikes are still made by Pashley. They’re not cheap and I’m unsure of after sales support, but they’re available: https://www.pashley.co.uk/products/delibike

Would I buy one? I’m actually tempted, but too old to get enough use out of one … and I’m a tightwad too :lol: .

Whilst these bikes do work (must have for they were quite widely used) I wonder how stable they were when loaded up to the maximum cargo weight (25Kg listed on the Pashley site and that weight is relatively high up from the ground). Perhaps outcomes of use are influenced by the experience, size and strength of the rider.
Last edited by Carlton green on 13 Feb 2024, 9:20am, edited 1 time in total.
Don’t fret, it’s OK to: ride a simple old bike; ride slowly, walk, rest and admire the view; ride off-road; ride in your raincoat; ride by yourself; ride in the dark; and ride one hundred yards or one hundred miles. Your bike and your choices to suit you.
Bmblbzzz
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by Bmblbzzz »

Pretty, but if you want something to actually deliver goods on, rather than to advertise your business, I'm fairly sure a conventional cargo bike would do it better for not much more cost.
Carlton green
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by Carlton green »

Bmblbzzz wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 4:44pm Pretty, but if you want something to actually deliver goods on, rather than to advertise your business, I'm fairly sure a conventional cargo bike would do it better for not much more cost.
My checks on new cargo bikes showed them to be quite expensive, dearer than the Pashley, but maybe I was looking in the wrong place. Of course the Pashley is relatively compact compared to most cargo bikes and ideal (?) for loads of groceries - in-line with the topic of the thread. In terms of bang per buck, for moving many small items, I think that the Elephant Bikes must be hard to beat. The P2 looks interesting too and is much cheaper than the Grocery Bike.

Just a three speed hub might not be ideal; whilst I’m an advocate of three speed Sturmey Archer gears there comes a time when something with much more gear ratio range is actually a usefully better tool for the job - around here is quite hilly. A proper cargo bike would offer that wider range of usually needed gears.
Don’t fret, it’s OK to: ride a simple old bike; ride slowly, walk, rest and admire the view; ride off-road; ride in your raincoat; ride by yourself; ride in the dark; and ride one hundred yards or one hundred miles. Your bike and your choices to suit you.
Slowroad
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by Slowroad »

Normally attached to a Revolution Trailfinder but this photo appeared first...
IMG_20230414_091016307.jpg
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pete75
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by pete75 »

Carlton green wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 4:40pm
pete75 wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 2:43pm
Jdsk wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 2:06pm Delivery by cycle courier from Westgate Oxford:
https://westgateoxford.co.uk/dropit

Jonathan
Time was when almost every grocer provided that service.
Delibikes or Grocers’ bikes are still made by Pashley. They’re not cheap and I’m unsure of after sales support, but they’re available: https://www.pashley.co.uk/products/delibike

Would I buy one? I’m actually tempted, but too old to get enough use out of one … and I’m a tightwad too :lol: .

Whilst these bikes do work (must have for they were quite widely used) I wonder how stable they were when loaded up to the maximum cargo weight (25Kg listed on the Pashley site and that weight is relatively high up from the ground). Perhaps outcomes of use are influenced by the experience, size and strength of the rider.
One of ours at the International Stores was made by Pashley, so they've been doing them a long time.
Didn't seem to have any stability problems with a full load.

When I was delivery lad at a bakers shop, I used something like this. You can get a lot in them, but they take some pedalling.

Image
'Give me my bike, a bit of sunshine - and a stop-off for a lunchtime pint - and I'm a happy man.' - Reg Baker
Carlton green
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by Carlton green »

pete75 wrote: 13 Feb 2024, 10:55am
Carlton green wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 4:40pm
Delibikes or Grocers’ bikes are still made by Pashley. They’re not cheap and I’m unsure of after sales support, but they’re available: https://www.pashley.co.uk/products/delibike

Whilst these bikes do work (must have for they were quite widely used) I wonder how stable they were when loaded up to the maximum cargo weight (25Kg listed on the Pashley site and that weight is relatively high up from the ground). Perhaps outcomes of use are influenced by the experience, size and strength of the rider.
One of ours at the International Stores was made by Pashley, so they've been doing them a long time.
Didn't seem to have any stability problems with a full load.
Ah, but in your own words: “When I started time trialling, I was turning in remarkably quick times for boy, thanks to pedalling that thing all day Saturday and 3 hours on 2 week nights.”

One can but suspect that you were relatively strong and well able to manage a bike. :)
Don’t fret, it’s OK to: ride a simple old bike; ride slowly, walk, rest and admire the view; ride off-road; ride in your raincoat; ride by yourself; ride in the dark; and ride one hundred yards or one hundred miles. Your bike and your choices to suit you.
pete75
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by pete75 »

Carlton green wrote: 13 Feb 2024, 11:20am
pete75 wrote: 13 Feb 2024, 10:55am
Carlton green wrote: 12 Feb 2024, 4:40pm
Delibikes or Grocers’ bikes are still made by Pashley. They’re not cheap and I’m unsure of after sales support, but they’re available: https://www.pashley.co.uk/products/delibike

Whilst these bikes do work (must have for they were quite widely used) I wonder how stable they were when loaded up to the maximum cargo weight (25Kg listed on the Pashley site and that weight is relatively high up from the ground). Perhaps outcomes of use are influenced by the experience, size and strength of the rider.
One of ours at the International Stores was made by Pashley, so they've been doing them a long time.
Didn't seem to have any stability problems with a full load.
Ah, but in your own words: “When I started time trialling, I was turning in remarkably quick times for boy, thanks to pedalling that thing all day Saturday and 3 hours on 2 week nights.”

One can but suspect that you were relatively strong and well able to manage a bike. :)
I started the job when I was 13, so not for the first year or two. Well I could manage a bike, but somebody who can't shouldn't be on one, obviously not very strong though..
'Give me my bike, a bit of sunshine - and a stop-off for a lunchtime pint - and I'm a happy man.' - Reg Baker
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jrs665
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by jrs665 »

WIll probably get the Burley Nomad for touring and shopping if needed if can't order shopping due to another pandemic like covid.

Converting the trike to electric, so will come in handy for all the electric batteries ill need - lol
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al_yrpal
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by al_yrpal »

Loaded bikes....
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P1000344_lzn - Copy.jpg
Al :lol:
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Reuse, recycle, thus do your bit to save the planet.... Get stuff at auctions, Dump, Charity Shops, Facebook Marketplace, Ebay, Car Boots. Choose an Old House, and a Banger ..... And cycle as often as you can......
SwiftyDoesIt
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by SwiftyDoesIt »

My load yesterday, about 45lb in the bags and 70lb in rucksack, luckily my friend only lives 3.5miles across town.
I'd rather take two trips with a bike than take a trailer, particularly during busy traffic, there's barely any difference to being unloaded for me over that distance and it feels safer and less to consider.

With a trailer there's just so much more, how much space you need, timings across roundabouts, turning in angles, how much you can swerve, whether the load is bouncing around, avoiding potholes that can be awkward if you're avoiding them on the front wheel, that's just the ones off top of m head.

I'm sure there will be times when I think a trailer of some sort could be ideal, but for me it's not worth it even with these kind of loads.
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pliptrot
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by pliptrot »

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Jdsk
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by Jdsk »

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Carlton green
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Re: How do you carry big shopping?

Post by Carlton green »

pliptrot wrote: 15 Feb 2024, 9:19amImage
For some time I’ve been sure that I really do need one of those cargo trikes - they can shift virtually anything and be prepared, etc. However what I’d actually use one for and where I’d store it is less clear :D
Don’t fret, it’s OK to: ride a simple old bike; ride slowly, walk, rest and admire the view; ride off-road; ride in your raincoat; ride by yourself; ride in the dark; and ride one hundred yards or one hundred miles. Your bike and your choices to suit you.
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