Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trail))

Cycle-touring, Expeditions, Adventures, Major cycle routes NOT LeJoG (see other special board)
porky
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby porky » 10 May 2012, 12:44pm

I have ridden the whole TPT a couple of times, it is my favourite coast-to-coast ride. Some bit are slow, some bits are bumpy and one bit is, for me at least, get off and push. For me, three and a half days with camping gear would be a bit ambitious, I did it in five days and stayed in B&Bs or hotels, but then I am a middle-aged bloke carring a fair bit of excess weight. With reference to the five statements:

1) you will need to have a bath ... a bath is always nice, but the most important thing for aching muscles is a good stretch
2) You won't be able to camp ... a fit and strong person would have no problems, for some people camping is all part of the fun, but I would prefer a B&B
3) your backside will be too sore from cycling ... I have hapilly cycled over a hundred miles in a day on a mountain bike and have never had a sore bum
4) you will need a camel back ... I like them, but a couple of bottles of water work just as well
5) You will need padded cycling ... I have never felt the need (see 3 above)
My car does 40 miles on a gallon of petrol, my bike will do that on a mug of tea and a slice of cake.

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Si
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby Si » 10 May 2012, 1:21pm

My 2p worth.....

Hot baths...nice at the end of a ride, but I find that if I've got to get up and ride the next morning then the first 10-20 miles I feel really sluggish. Much rather go for a shower (with a spurt of cool water at the end if muscles feel strained).

Re- distance and camping - the two that are worried don't appear to be overly experienced cyclists at longish touring otherwise they'd know if they could do this distance with this load already. This being the case they may well find it very hard going.

Sore backsides - yep, following on from my point above they probably will. Not sure why a bed should be any better for this than a good sleeping mat though?

Obviously they will not need a camelback. Camelbacks have been around for no more than about 15 years - so are your friends saying that no one could ride any distance before that?

Padded shorts - yep they may well help. They aren't a necessity if your bum is accustomed to the distance and you have the right saddle - but in the case in point I'm guessing that this is not so.

Why not just organise a weekend's camping trip just so that they can experience the mileage and camping kit weight that you will be using and thus can see for themselves if they are biting off more than they can chew?

andrewleck
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby andrewleck » 10 May 2012, 1:36pm

1,2 and 3 utter garbage.

4 depends on the weather, and your route, I would rather carry too much liquid than run out.

5. padded shorts are a must for 60+ miles on a daily basis.

Edwards
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby Edwards » 10 May 2012, 2:08pm

I assume they are talking about the modern idea that seems to be the rage with TV bods doing exercise, an ice bath. If so just use farm sites with a stream that should be cold enough.
However the ideal would be a massage by a young blond Nymph and forget the ride.

I generally find that trying to sleep in a strange bed very difficult and do not have the problem with the same sleeping bag and mat.

If they want to carry water on their backs who are we to disagree. Just put some extra water bottles in the carriers on their bikes.
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gbnz
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby gbnz » 10 May 2012, 2:43pm

snibgo wrote:
Personally, I couldn't do 60-80 miles/day of TPT. In my younger days possibly, but certainly not now.


Conversely I couldn't have done 60-80 miles on the TPT in my younger days.

However though I felt tired after my recent coast to coast, over the pennines twice, 3-4 lake district mountain passes, carrying a full camping load and walking boots, I realised that door to door I'd actually done 295 miles and 8473' of climbing in the space of 58 hours.

Thus I started to feel tired, perhaps 2.5 miles from home, with a 400' climb ahead of me

In contrast my first 18 miles with camping gear, left me feeling tired when I was 17

nmnm
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby nmnm » 11 May 2012, 1:34pm

Why not get out and pedal 80 miles and see how you feel?

CoolHandLuke
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby CoolHandLuke » 11 May 2012, 4:29pm

I have cycled across France (north to south) twice now, with two different fully laden bikes and averaged about 60 miles a day (some times more, some times less).

Neither time did I use padded shorts and my buttock was fine. I didn't wash every night - yet alone have a bath. Often, I would just pitch by the side of the road - the one time, in someone's front garden. A good ground mat is essential to keep out the cold and iron out the bumps. Water is also essential, but I would say a camel back is excessive, and you don't really want a backpack when touring. I loaded up on 2 litre bottles of water each day and stopped as needed to drink on the way.

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horizon
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby horizon » 11 May 2012, 5:53pm

CoolHandLuke wrote:I have cycled across France (north to south) twice now, with two different fully laden bikes and averaged about 60 miles a day (some times more, some times less).



I think there's a question mark over the type of route. I cover similar mileages fully laden but stick to small roads or even big ones. When you're navigating a cycle path the luggage makes the usual obstructions and bad surfaces even slower and more tiring to negotiate. What sort of roads/paths were you on?
When the pestilence strikes from the East, go far and breathe the cold air deeply. Ignore the sage, stay not indoors. Ho Ri Zon 12th Century Chinese philosopher

CoolHandLuke
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby CoolHandLuke » 11 May 2012, 6:17pm

horizon wrote:
CoolHandLuke wrote:I have cycled across France (north to south) twice now, with two different fully laden bikes and averaged about 60 miles a day (some times more, some times less).



I think there's a question mark over the type of route. I cover similar mileages fully laden but stick to small roads or even big ones. When you're navigating a cycle path the luggage makes the usual obstructions and bad surfaces even slower and more tiring to negotiate. What sort of roads/paths were you on?


Good point. Both times is was back roads with tarmac. The first time I went through central France, circumventing most of the big towns, then through the Gorge du Tarn, ending up in Marseillan - quite a hilly route. The second time it was the mostly flat (and dull) route down the west coast to Biarritz. Back then, certainly not now, I feel I could have done the same hours each day off road, with the same luggage. It had been my intention both times to cross the Pyrenees, but it was not to be[1].

[1] The first time I ran short of money and the second time my frame was cracked - will never use an alloy frame for touring again.

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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby Gearoidmuar » 11 May 2012, 8:55pm

I've only once or twice had a bath in 68 tours, and that was because a shower wasn't available.

It is possible to get your muscles really sore if you push yourself flat out, but if you just twirl away all day, you won't need a bath,

A couple of panadol at night help sore legs.

The dehydration thing is nonsense, though if it's very hot you will need to drink lots. My max on a 137 mile day in roasting hot Italy years ago was 14 litres. It was 35C all day.
Normally on a long day in temperate weather, four bottles or less would do fine. I've never used a Camelbak.

If you've a saddle that suits you and you're used to it, you'll be fine. If it's VERY hot use vaseline (I used to always use it but stopped a couple of years ago).

p.s. Going on tour no. 69 tomorrow.

pete75
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby pete75 » 11 May 2012, 10:56pm

If they really believe all those things then for them they are the truth of the matter not myths...

andrewleck
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby andrewleck » 12 May 2012, 12:43pm

CoolHandLuke wrote:I have cycled across France (north to south) twice now, with two different fully laden bikes and averaged about 60 miles a day (some times more, some times less).

Neither time did I use padded shorts and my <i>[rude word removed]</i> was fine. I didn't wash every night - yet alone have a bath. Often, I would just pitch by the side of the road - the one time, in someone's front garden. A good ground mat is essential to keep out the cold and iron out the bumps. Water is also essential, but I would say a camel back is excessive, and you don't really want a backpack when touring. I loaded up on 2 litre bottles of water each day and stopped as needed to drink on the way.


I am cycling the Alps fully loaded in July planning on 80km days with at least one big climb a day. I will be taking a 3 ltr bladder as I think it will be essential if the weather is 'good'. I would prefer to be able to sip water little and often rather than having to stop or grovel for a bottle every few minutes, it will also free up bottle cages on the frame for a fuel canister and could avoid searching for a water source if I end up wild camping. Though as mentioned for touring in an urbanised area then it is overkill.

T other Dave
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby T other Dave » 12 May 2012, 6:16pm

It sounds like fun already pre trip bickering, 1st rule, it'll be allright dont worry 8) . You should agree with your mates about post ride/exercise therapy, but print off all the sports science bumff about ice baths being the best recovery and make the take one every night, whilst you have a refreshing shower. Padded shorts are fantastic you dont need them but there great, Water, if some of us can ride across France and Spain in the summer with temps pushing 40 just using 2 water bottles then I'm pretty sure you'll manage the flat lands of Cheshire in the rain without a camelbak...
Enjoy the trip let every one else worry about stupid things, big smiles and crack on.
Dave.

pau1ine
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby pau1ine » 13 May 2012, 9:04am

1) Need for bath - no because after a long day cycling, getting an evening meal will be a priority so a quick session in the shower is more like it.

3) Problem with camping - is this really about lugging the weight?

Dudley Manlove
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Re: Ridiculous statements need debunking (Trans Pennine Trai

Postby Dudley Manlove » 13 May 2012, 1:40pm

adam1 wrote:1) At the end of a day cycling (60-80 miles) "you will need to have a bath to soak your aching muscles."
It's nice on the odd occasion where you get the entire floor of a hostel or someplace to yourself and can take over and indulge yourself, but...no!

2) You won't be able to camp as "you will be carrying too much weight and it will be impossible."
3) You won't be able to camp as "your backside will be too sore from cycling and you will need a comfy bed" (I am not making this up)
Cycle camping is probably the norm touring.

4) Constant re-hydration - "you will need a camel back [a drinks system with a straw] to constantly rehydrate" (I did warn you about the ludicrous)
That's what the pub is for. You are not crossing the Sahara!

5) You will need padded cycling shorts (ok there is some truth in this but I won't be using them).
I don't bother, but this is a personal one.