Tools for new build

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pickerd1
Posts: 36
Joined: 31 Mar 2014, 5:05pm

Tools for new build

Postby pickerd1 » 5 Oct 2015, 7:25pm

I'm planning a couple of new builds, and hope to do more in the future, and I'm looking for advice on some tools for the job ...
- headset press (1 1/8" for now) - presently I use a threaded rod and large sockets
- crown race installer - brute force and ignorance used until now

Also planning on a respray / powder coat for another frame and would like to remove the headset bearing cases.

Can anyone recommend tolls please?

Cheers

Brucey
Posts: 34793
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby Brucey » 5 Oct 2015, 9:00pm

take a look at the park tools website. You should be able to source 'the proper tools' without too much difficulty.

However the quality of the work you do is not dependant on the tools you have; it is your ability to use them.

Someone who knows what they are doing will do high quality work with the tools you have at present [BTW I'd add a set of vernier calipers to check the fits, and a brass rod to drift steel headset cups out with; aluminium ones can often be removed with wooden dowel, since any other tools will mar the surfaces]. However an unskilled mechanic will wreck the parts no matter how many tools they have.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

gregoryoftours
Posts: 997
Joined: 22 May 2011, 7:14pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby gregoryoftours » 5 Oct 2015, 9:45pm

I have the cyclus headset press and it's pretty decent -
http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/search/find/?q=headset+press
It's not much different from the park tool pro one but the latter has a quick adjust mechanism to make using the tool faster. I certainly wouldn't go with the park home mechanic tool, it's no better than what you have now and costs £55.
I also have a cyclus crown race setter but it's pretty crude, just having 2 square edged tube fittings for 1 and 1 1/8. There is quite a risk of damaging races if they're conical etc, sometimes I've mucked about with suitable large washers in conjunction with the cyclus tool to avoid doing so. The park one is pretty good because it has loads of adapters shaped for different types of crown race, but of course it's expensive. I think that lots of people have done a pretty good job with a bit of plumbing plastic pipe, or careful use of a bit of wood/mallet is ok I guess.

MikeF
Posts: 3706
Joined: 11 Nov 2012, 9:24am
Location: On the borders of the four South East Counties

Re: Tools for new build

Postby MikeF » 5 Oct 2015, 11:43pm

Brucey wrote: However an unskilled mechanic will wreck the parts no matter how many tools they have.
True, but we all have to learn. Some "mechanical sympathy" helps as well.
"It takes a genius to spot the obvious" - my old physics master

old_windbag
Posts: 1868
Joined: 19 Feb 2015, 3:55pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby old_windbag » 6 Oct 2015, 12:04am

I have the cyclus headset press, its really nice and very solidly made. It cost me about £30 but I've also used it as a BB30 press for push in cups too. The tool to remove headset cups as below works well, I used one at Sustrans.

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/lifeline-headset-cup-remover-1-18-1-14/

Sadly I don't own one and have used dowelling to remove old cups :( .

A crown race tool would also be nice to have as I've found the methods using pvc pipe etc simply didn't work.... or I wasn't forceful enough. Actually on this point I have sawn a slot in the crown race and fitted it( if you can buy a headset with a split crown race it makes life easy... as it should be ). Do others frown upon this bodge?

A third hand tool for brake cables can be good to use, I also have the chain power link seperator/installer.

I have two torque wrenches, one for 3-30nm ( covers most bolts ) and a large one 30-210nm for crank bolts. Both low cost sealey/draper types but with calibration certificate. A full set of T-handle allen/torx drivers bought from aldi but very good quality.

Valbrona
Posts: 2192
Joined: 7 Feb 2011, 4:49pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby Valbrona » 6 Oct 2015, 3:10am

Modern integrated headsets do not contain crown races, so no slide hammer required.
I should coco.

pwa
Posts: 9853
Joined: 2 Oct 2011, 8:55pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby pwa » 6 Oct 2015, 7:40am

Unless you really want to do it all yourself (which you may do) I would leave the headset press to the LBS. Mine charges about £10 and takes no time at all. It's about the only job I don't do myself. It's not a job that needs doing often, so it's not worth tooling up for. Or is it?

reohn2
Posts: 35248
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby reohn2 » 6 Oct 2015, 9:48am

pwa wrote:Unless you really want to do it all yourself (which you may do) I would leave the headset press to the LBS. Mine charges about £10 and takes no time at all. It's about the only job I don't do myself. It's not a job that needs doing often, so it's not worth tooling up for. Or is it?


Three times gets you your money back,though with cartridge bearing h/sets fitting and removal is a lot less often.
I' managed up to now with threaded rod and washers made from 18mm plywood supported with large 'penny' washers.
I made a removal tool from the toptube of a scrape frame.
I use a length of plastic waste pipe*,to seat the crown race on the fork,and another with slots cut in to remove them.

If I were fitting and removing h/sets on a regular basis I'd invest in the correct tools,but the tools I have suffice for the amount of use they get.

*I used push fit pipe as it's non brittle polypropylene unlike solvent fit pipes,they come in two sizes 11/2" and 11/4",make sure you get the right diameter and cost about £2.50 for 2.4m length.
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I cycle therefore I am.

MikeF
Posts: 3706
Joined: 11 Nov 2012, 9:24am
Location: On the borders of the four South East Counties

Re: Tools for new build

Postby MikeF » 6 Oct 2015, 10:21am

reohn2 wrote:I use a length of plastic waste pipe*,to seat the crown race on the fork,and another with slots cut in to remove them.
Do you mean the headset cups? If it's removal of the crown race can you explain?
"It takes a genius to spot the obvious" - my old physics master

pwa
Posts: 9853
Joined: 2 Oct 2011, 8:55pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby pwa » 6 Oct 2015, 10:23am

reohn2 wrote:
pwa wrote:Unless you really want to do it all yourself (which you may do) I would leave the headset press to the LBS. Mine charges about £10 and takes no time at all. It's about the only job I don't do myself. It's not a job that needs doing often, so it's not worth tooling up for. Or is it?


Three times gets you your money back,though with cartridge bearing h/sets fitting and removal is a lot less often.
I' managed up to now with threaded rod and washers made from 18mm plywood supported with large 'penny' washers.
I made a removal tool from the toptube of a scrape frame.
I use a length of plastic waste pipe*,to seat the crown race on the fork,and another with slots cut in to remove them.

If I were fitting and removing h/sets on a regular basis I'd invest in the correct tools,but the tools I have suffice for the amount of use they get.

*I used push fit pipe as it's non brittle polypropylene unlike solvent fit pipes,they come in two sizes 11/2" and 11/4",make sure you get the right diameter and cost about £2.50 for 2.4m length.


I think I've needed headset parts pressing into the frame a couple of times in the past ten years, so asking the LBS to do it at £10 a go seems reasonable. But I can understand people wanting to do it themselves.

reohn2
Posts: 35248
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby reohn2 » 6 Oct 2015, 11:11am

MikeF wrote:
reohn2 wrote:I use a length of plastic waste pipe*,to seat the crown race on the fork,and another with slots cut in to remove them.
Do you mean the headset cups? If it's removal of the crown race can you explain?


The fork crown race needs tapping squarely on to the fork crown shoulder,a length of waste pipe cut square and larger than the diameter and longer than the steerer tube,but smaller than the diameter of the race, is strong enough for the job.
A similar length of waste pipe with two cut outs off the end to clear the the fork crown,yet bear on crown race to tap it off it's seating.
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old_windbag
Posts: 1868
Joined: 19 Feb 2015, 3:55pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby old_windbag » 6 Oct 2015, 11:18am

From my own perspective I bought headset press etc as I have made up systems in the past but felt having the correct tool was an investment. I thought I could be asked by someone to put in a new headset, or just for another bike build. I've used it 3-4 times so far and its a pleasure to use.

Another tool I bought ( again after making up a contraption ) was a fork cutting guide. For £10 from planet-x it was a bargain and is solidly built. I've used that once on the spa audax, but have loaned it out for two carbon fork cuts( as in carbon steerer ). Very useful.

The only reason I don't tend to use LBS is that I feel cheeky turning up for a £10 job when nearly all my purchases are from internet/aldi on cost grounds. It's nice to be independent though and be able to do jobs anytime you like, free.

Integrated headsets???? it'll never catch on this is a ctc forum..... yes they do make life easier. Certainly cartridge bearings do in general on most headsets.

MikeF
Posts: 3706
Joined: 11 Nov 2012, 9:24am
Location: On the borders of the four South East Counties

Re: Tools for new build

Postby MikeF » 6 Oct 2015, 2:22pm

reohn2 wrote:
MikeF wrote:
reohn2 wrote:I use a length of plastic waste pipe*,to seat the crown race on the fork,and another with slots cut in to remove them.
Do you mean the headset cups? If it's removal of the crown race can you explain?


The fork crown race needs tapping squarely on to the fork crown shoulder,a length of waste pipe cut square and larger than the diameter and longer than the steerer tube,but smaller than the diameter of the race, is strong enough for the job.
A similar length of waste pipe with two cut outs off the end to clear the the fork crown,yet bear on crown race to tap it off it's seating.

Thanks reohn. I understand seating the crown race and I think I now understand what you mean for the removal. I wouldn't have thought the pipe was strong enough like that for the removal, but obviously polypropylene pipe is.
"It takes a genius to spot the obvious" - my old physics master

reohn2
Posts: 35248
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby reohn2 » 6 Oct 2015, 3:27pm

MikeF wrote:..... I wouldn't have thought the pipe was strong enough like that for the removal, but obviously polypropylene pipe is.


If the race is very tight then plan B is tapping it with screwdriver alternately front and back of the crown to get it moving then try again with the polypipe,the seating is usually only about 6 to 10mm or so.
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I cycle therefore I am.

reohn2
Posts: 35248
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Tools for new build

Postby reohn2 » 6 Oct 2015, 3:29pm

pwa wrote:I think I've needed headset parts pressing into the frame a couple of times in the past ten years, so asking the LBS to do it at £10 a go seems reasonable. But I can understand people wanting to do it themselves.


I agree, it's how often the tool's needed that determines if at all or whether it's worth the outlay in either time or money.
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I cycle therefore I am.