New words/vocab on these fora

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bogmyrtle
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby bogmyrtle » 12 Feb 2020, 7:57am

Marcus Aurelius wrote:
Cyril Haearn wrote:Jockxit

It’s about SNP / Scottish blithering about leaving the U.K. Good luck with that :lol:

We blether in Scotland :wink:
A bike does more miles to the banana than a Porsche.

mercalia
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mercalia » 27 Feb 2020, 9:22am

furbabies
Spare me the ‘furbabies’ – the humanisation of pets has gone too far Melissa Kite

Owners call their pets ‘furbabies’. The term is meant to be sweet but becomes more creepy the more you think about it. Some women have taken to calling themselves ‘fur mummies

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2020/02/pet-peeve/

Cyril Haearn
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Cyril Haearn » 28 Feb 2020, 11:07am

FSO
Fixie-Shaped-Object

Looks like a fixie but close examination reveals a freewheel :wink:
Nice one Cyrille, nice one son..
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on 49" fixed
We love safety cameras, we love life "1330"

mercalia
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mercalia » 29 Feb 2020, 3:05pm

leaplings or leapers


Those born on the 29th february so only have a birth day every 4 years

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-51662371/leap-year-what-it-s-like-being-born-on-29-february

does that mean you are likely to die when you are 25? or less

Mike Sales
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Mike Sales » 29 Feb 2020, 3:12pm

bogmyrtle wrote:We blether in Scotland :wink:


Mither or moider in various English or Welsh dialects.

Moedrodd yn Cymraeg.
Last edited by Mike Sales on 29 Feb 2020, 3:44pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Mick F
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Mick F » 29 Feb 2020, 3:25pm

Mike Sales wrote:
bogmyrtle wrote:We blether in Scotland :wink:


Mither or moider in various English or Welsh dialects.

Moedrodd in Cymraeg.
Yep.

As a kid in Wigan, it was moider.
Mrs Mick F was a kid in Liverpool, and she says mither.

I was born in Wales, but we left there when I was two, so although I have a Welsh birth certificate, I can't speak the lingo. :wink:

As for Scotland, it depends on where you are from my experience from living in Scotland for years and years.
They don't all blether ........ I guess it's a Glaswegian expression.
Ask someone from Edinburgh or Inverness.
Mick F. Cornwall

bogmyrtle
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby bogmyrtle » 1 Mar 2020, 10:07pm

Mick F wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
bogmyrtle wrote:We blether in Scotland :wink:


Mither or moider in various English or Welsh dialects.

Moedrodd in Cymraeg.
Yep.

As for Scotland, it depends on where you are from my experience from living in Scotland for years and years.
They don't all blether ........ I guess it's a Glaswegian expression.
Ask someone from Edinburgh or Inverness.


I beg to differ.
Blether is commoly used throughout Scotland, even in furry boot city
[url}https://www.facebook.com/events/inverleith-st-serfs-church-lunch-club/bite-blether/2357459834513676/[/url]
https://en-gb.facebook.com/blethercults/
https://www.huntly.net/visitors/information/doric.php
https://www.scotsman.com/news/scottish-word-week-blether-1567604
A bike does more miles to the banana than a Porsche.

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Pastychomper
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Pastychomper » 2 Mar 2020, 11:07am

People certainly blether in Caithness, often while occupying two 4x4s parked window-to-window in the middle of the road.
Some find it annoying, I think it's rather civilised (as long as their engines aren't left idling).
Everyone's ghast should get a good flabbering now and then.
--Ole Boot

Cyril Haearn
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Cyril Haearn » 3 Mar 2020, 4:07pm

Pastychomper wrote:People certainly blether in Caithness, often while occupying two 4x4s parked window-to-window in the middle of the road.
Some find it annoying, I think it's rather civilised (as long as their engines aren't left idling).

An effective way to prevent speeding crime too, plusminus, but a bit impolite I think
Mind, I did something similar in the food store, met someone I hadnae seen awhile, we talked for half an hour :wink:
Nice one Cyrille, nice one son..
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on 49" fixed
We love safety cameras, we love life "1330"

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NATURAL ANKLING
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby NATURAL ANKLING » 19 Mar 2020, 9:04am

Hi,
Cyril Haearn wrote:FSO
Fixie-Shaped-Object

Looks like a fixie but close examination reveals a freewheel :wink:

Complete with mandatory honey coloured leather Brooks, And olde worlde shop window or lamppost to lean against :P
NA Thinks Just End 2 End Return + Bivvy
You'll Still Find Me At The Top Of A Hill
Please forgive the poor Grammar I blame it on my mobile and phat thinkers.

mercalia
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby mercalia » 27 Mar 2020, 9:00pm

Covidiot

Capture.JPG



Derivation

‘Covidiot’ has been used to describe the people who crowded into seaside resorts and public parks, when most of the nation was avoiding public contact. It also denotes the drinkers who crammed into pubs for their last pint before lockdown. Those drunken groups who clinked glasses and put their arms around each other as they sang Neil Diamond’s ‘Sweet Caroline’, have been branded as irresponsible and foolish. Those who had ‘one last kiss’ before lockdown may now be suffering from more than a hangover.

Covidiocy is highly infectious: the condition is unpredictable with a short incubation period. In China, for example, Covidiocy made an appearance as soon as the peak infection rate subsided. Once the epidemic was under control, a new Covidiocy virus spread rapidly. Starting in Chinese state media, the daft theory that the US military intentionally released the disease in Hunan province, quickly infected media across the world. The Iranians followed, by blaming the Israelis and some of their allies said that it was God’s punishment on non-believers.

Experts are worried that Covidiocy will make an appearance in the UK once the lockdown ends and that various strains of the virus will evolve simultaneously. Covidiotic viral theories include the belief that this national emergency should form the basis on which society is organised in the future; that the government should pay our wages on a permanent basis, that industry should be run by the state and that we should close the borders and grow our own potatoes. One of the more dangerous strains is the belief that the Covid-19 is nature’s punishment for human indulgence. Super-spreaders of this theory may include Extinction Rebellion and George Monbiot.
Use

“Oy, get off, stop licking my face your covidiot.”


(Andy Shaw, The Spectator)

https://life.spectator.co.uk/articles/word-of-the-week-covidiot/

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fausto copy
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby fausto copy » 27 Mar 2020, 9:57pm

Mike Sales wrote:
bogmyrtle wrote:We blether in Scotland :wink:


Mither or moider in various English or Welsh dialects.

Moedrodd yn Cymraeg.


Where I come from the word mither meant to pester, (not necessarily vocally).

Bonefishblues
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Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Bonefishblues » 28 Mar 2020, 9:46am

fausto copy wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
bogmyrtle wrote:We blether in Scotland :wink:


Mither or moider in various English or Welsh dialects.

Moedrodd yn Cymraeg.


Where I come from the word mither meant to pester, (not necessarily vocally).

And me, also.

Mike Sales
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Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: New words/vocab on these fora

Postby Mike Sales » 28 Mar 2020, 9:54am

Bonefishblues wrote:
fausto copy wrote:
Mike Sales wrote:
Mither or moider in various English or Welsh dialects.

Moedrodd yn Cymraeg.


Where I come from the word mither meant to pester, (not necessarily vocally).

And me, also.


The Bangor usage has that idea in it too.

"Don't moider my head."
Meaning, "leave me alone, don't give me that nonsense."