Getting into the recumbent cycling

DIscuss anything relating to non-standard cycles and their equipment.
nigelnightmare
Posts: 335
Joined: 19 Sep 2016, 10:33pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby nigelnightmare » 12 Jun 2018, 1:50pm

RE Disc or Drum brakes

If you weigh the Hub,Rotor & caliper of a disc brake system and compare it to the weight of the drum brake system they work out almost equal.

Discs "can" give better braking in the dry! but will go through brake pads rapidly.
Sometimes they will need adjusting after a long/steep descent.
Also rotors wear and need renewing and they're prone to warping causing the brakes to rub making a horrible annoying noise!

Compared that to drums that give consistent braking in all conditions and last a very long, long time 50,000 miles+ , don't make any noise and are practically maintenance free And when adjusted properly don't bind.

HTH

Quicksilver89
Posts: 21
Joined: 11 Nov 2017, 8:44pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Quicksilver89 » 22 Jun 2018, 2:47pm

Haven't logged on for a while as I've been busy writing up the PhD but I have a break now :)

I got some scorcher 120s and I do feel a big difference, and I'm about to get a larger chainring as I spend a lot of time spinning out in the top gear.

One thing I want to know is are the footrests on the pedal that keep the bottom of my foot in place? Something like the straps on this bike maybe

https://missioncycles.co.uk/product/mis ... id=1&pid=1

With a strap on the bottom for my foot to rest on.

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[XAP]Bob
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Joined: 26 Sep 2008, 4:12pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby [XAP]Bob » 22 Jun 2018, 2:48pm

I have some heel straps on MicroBob’s trike - but cleats are preferred if you aren’t growing through shoes like a child...
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way.
No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
A good pun is it's own reword

There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

Quicksilver89
Posts: 21
Joined: 11 Nov 2017, 8:44pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Quicksilver89 » 22 Jun 2018, 4:36pm

https://www.getcycling.org.uk/details.php?id=267&c=197

Something like this? Seems like it would do the trick :)

Quicksilver89
Posts: 21
Joined: 11 Nov 2017, 8:44pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Quicksilver89 » 9 Jul 2018, 4:41pm

nigelnightmare wrote:On my QNT I use a 55/42/30 with a 32-9 rear and find I can still pedal at 35+ mph (downhill).
You need higher than normal gearing because of the small wheels.
Most cycle gearing is set up for 26"-28" (700c) wheels.
HTH

Up till a couple of weeks ago I was doing an average speed of 9-10 mph.
Now I'm up to 12-14 mph after I did a 25 mile cycle challenge two weeks ago.
Tyres are standard marathon 40-406 @ 70 psi.
Mine is fully loaded with mudguards, rear rack and pannier bags and hub dynamo lights.

The higher speed will come as your legs get used to it.


I have a Trice Q, can I get the same chainring setup on that?

I'm spinning out all the time now! lol

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[XAP]Bob
Posts: 16305
Joined: 26 Sep 2008, 4:12pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby [XAP]Bob » 9 Jul 2018, 5:36pm

You’ll be able to...
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way.
No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
A good pun is it's own reword

There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

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Tigerbiten
Posts: 1555
Joined: 29 Jun 2009, 6:49am

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Tigerbiten » 10 Jul 2018, 4:17pm

You need to put the chain on the small chainring and measure the gap between the chain and the bottom of the front derailleur cage.
You need 2 mm per chainring tooth increase/decrease.
IE:- If you can move the front derailleur up by just over 10mm then you can increase the big chainring by 5 teeth.
I used that trick to find I could go from the standard 48/36/26 triple to a non-standard 48/36/22 triple for an extra gear down.

Another option is to use a 50-406 Big Apple vs the 40-406 Racer for a rough 1% increase in top speed ....... :D
But if you do use a 50-406 back tyre then you need to remove the spacer from the front of the back mudguard where it meets the frame to give you a little more clearance.

nigelnightmare
Posts: 335
Joined: 19 Sep 2016, 10:33pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby nigelnightmare » 10 Jul 2018, 11:24pm

Quicksilver89 wrote:
nigelnightmare wrote:On my QNT I use a 55/42/30 with a 32-9 rear and find I can still pedal at 35+ mph (downhill).
You need higher than normal gearing because of the small wheels.
Most cycle gearing is set up for 26"-28" (700c) wheels.
HTH

Up till a couple of weeks ago I was doing an average speed of 9-10 mph.
Now I'm up to 12-14 mph after I did a 25 mile cycle challenge two weeks ago.
Tyres are standard marathon 40-406 @ 70 psi.
Mine is fully loaded with mudguards, rear rack and pannier bags and hub dynamo lights.

The higher speed will come as your legs get used to it.


I have a Trice Q, can I get the same chainring setup on that?

I'm spinning out all the time now! lol


You can BUT it's expensive! as you'll need a Capreo hub ££! (or complete wheel) ?££ and custom capreo cassette ££! and special tool for fitting/removing the cassette.
All available from ICE.

The 55 tooth chainring "was" an option from ICE, but also commonly available.

If you decide to build your own wheel remember it is NOT dished like a regular rear wheel.
Meaning you only need one length of spokes and even tension on both drive & non drive sides.

HTH

hercule
Posts: 817
Joined: 5 Feb 2011, 5:18pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby hercule » 11 Jul 2018, 7:15am

Or alternatively use a hybrid hub gear/derailleur hub like the SRAM Dual Drive (now out of production but might be available still on eBay etc) or the Sturmey Archer CS hubs for 3 times the gears with extra high and low ranges. I’ve fitted the S.A. CS-RF3 hub to mine to get a huge gear range. A bit noisy and heavy but it gets the job done - I can pedal up the steepest roads and pedal at 35mph+ down the other side.


I'm a trendy consumer. Just look at my stupid phone.