Getting into the recumbent cycling

DIscuss anything relating to non-standard cycles and their equipment.
UpWrong
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby UpWrong » 12 Aug 2018, 8:22am

Get a 55T ring. ICE offered that as an option on the Q.

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squeaker
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Location: Bramber, West Sussex

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby squeaker » 12 Aug 2018, 9:13am

Higher top speeds may look impressive, but on a 'there and back' route most time is spent going uphill (where you are slowest) so to increase average speed you need to work on that aspect ;)
I don't understand the bit about the seat not staying more reclined - can you post some photos of the attachment points where it currently works and where it doesn't? More recline will make you more aerodynamic, as will non-flappy clothing.
Shorter cranks will help with spinning - many 'bent riders use 150 to 155s for that purpose (and reducing knee loads) - probably less expensive than a capreo rear swap (9T not that efficient IHMO), Finally, using a Big Apple 50-406 rear tyre will get you another 5% in speed for the same wheel rotation velocity :wink: but check that you have enough clearance first.
HTH
"42"

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Tigerbiten
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Tigerbiten » 12 Aug 2018, 12:25pm

For better gears, I'd fit a triple up front.
A long cage derailleur will just cope with 48 tooth difference.
So 48-32+11 = 27 or you should be ok with a 26 tooth difference big -> little chainring.
A 56t chainring will give you another gear up.
Put the chain on your small chainring and measure the gap between the chain and the bottom of the derailleur cage.
You need 2 mm per tooth.
So if it's over 20 mm a 56-44-30 triple should work.
This will also give you another gear down.

Don't worry about spinning out as I can easily spin out a 130" gear which is 50% higher than you top gear.
But I've only once spun my top out which is around 100% higher than your top.
My trike was purposely built with an ultra wider gear range.

What's your BCD ??
If it's 130 then a 44t Stronglight 130/74 BCD Adaptor ring will convert a double to a triple.
Then you just need the outer and inner chainrings.
£50 for outer, £30 for middle/adapter and £20 for inner.
So probably around £100 for all the bits from Spa cycles.

Quicksilver89
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Joined: 11 Nov 2017, 8:44pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Quicksilver89 » 23 Aug 2018, 3:33pm

squeaker wrote:Higher top speeds may look impressive, but on a 'there and back' route most time is spent going uphill (where you are slowest) so to increase average speed you need to work on that aspect ;)
I don't understand the bit about the seat not staying more reclined - can you post some photos of the attachment points where it currently works and where it doesn't? More recline will make you more aerodynamic, as will non-flappy clothing.
Shorter cranks will help with spinning - many 'bent riders use 150 to 155s for that purpose (and reducing knee loads) - probably less expensive than a capreo rear swap (9T not that efficient IHMO), Finally, using a Big Apple 50-406 rear tyre will get you another 5% in speed for the same wheel rotation velocity :wink: but check that you have enough clearance first.
HTH


I've figured out how to recline the seat more, had a 30km ride today with a fair bit of climbing - average speed of 16km/h

In a reclined position I felt I wasn't able to transfer as much power into the pedals. Might this be because I'm working on slightly different muscle groups?

Also when my legs start to tire I feel it on my upper thighs the most and it feels as though there is a 'dead spot' when cycling. Is this normal?

Finally I feel the bike starts to spin out when I get to around 13mph, my handbike used to get to that point when going towards 18-20 mph so yeah perhaps more improved gearing is a possibility. However it may be more useful to the back derailleur as I upgraded to a shimano Tiagra 52T recently on the front. I don't usually feel the need to go into the other chainring it comes with (36T).

Any further advice?, still relatively new to the recumbent cycling thing and it may be that I haven't found the right position that suits me. I have minor cerebral palsy which causes a bit of muscle stiffness in the legs. Though the only thing I notice when riding is that my left foot turns inward a bit on the pedal.

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squeaker
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby squeaker » 23 Aug 2018, 3:58pm

Quicksilver89 wrote:I feel the bike starts to spin out when I get to around 13mph

Hmm: 52/11 with 40mm tyres on 406 rims at 13mph = 49rev/min at the cranks. That's not spinning :? I aim to hold around 90rev/min when trying... Misprint?
And more reclined will change the muscle balance. There used (still is?) a theory that a more 'closed' eg higher bottom bracket and /or more upright seat was better for climbing (at lower rpm) but it's complicated :roll:
"42"

Quicksilver89
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Quicksilver89 » 23 Aug 2018, 10:30pm

squeaker wrote:
Quicksilver89 wrote:I feel the bike starts to spin out when I get to around 13mph

Hmm: 52/11 with 40mm tyres on 406 rims at 13mph = 49rev/min at the cranks. That's not spinning :? I aim to hold around 90rev/min when trying... Misprint?
And more reclined will change the muscle balance. There used (still is?) a theory that a more 'closed' eg higher bottom bracket and /or more upright seat was better for climbing (at lower rpm) but it's complicated :roll:


Perhaps haha, with my handbike I preferred cycling at a lower cadence and maybe I'm just used to that and need to adapt to high cadences. Maybe I was struggling to get more out of the pedals when I was tired. My legs felt stiffer especially around the thighs in my upper legs... I wonder if the boom is too far in and I'm bending the knees too much?

Most of my cycling has been commuting with a few more serious rides so I'm quite new towards more endurance stuff. Still feel I need to find the sweet spot with the setup to get the most out of the bike with my set up. Perhaps my legs are weaker then I thought too haha, they still feel very tired at the moment! some of the hills were getting towards 10% though.

OldBloke
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby OldBloke » 24 Aug 2018, 12:35am

A cadence of 90 is a good target. I tried for a long time to get to the level where I could maintain it, but have settled on a cadence of around 70-80 is what's comfortable for me. I ride with another guy who has very slow twitch muscles and prefers 50-60. Experiment till you find a cadence that's comfortable. As your 'bent legs develop you'll be able to increase it.

You can check your boom position by placing your heal on the pedal, rotate to the furthest extension, your leg should be nearly straight. In other words with your foot in your normal pedaling position your knee should be slightly bent at it's furthest extension. You don't want the boom out so far that you can lock your knee. Do a search for 'recumbent boom position' and you'll find plenty of info.

UpWrong
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby UpWrong » 24 Aug 2018, 6:54am

I have CP as well, and with trikes I have the boom extended a bit further out than than the "heel on pedal" distance. Because of tight calves and lack of flexibility in the ankle the longer distance works better. Shorter cranks may help too.

mark aldridge
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby mark aldridge » 24 Aug 2018, 3:17pm

Just one note of caution regarding how straight your legs should be able to go whilst pedaling. I would advise erring on the side of caution and go shorter rather than longer until you have built up recumbent specific leg muscles. The reason for this is that if the leg is over extended on a recumbent there is a possibility of damage to the knees by bending them negatively. This is due to two things, the weight of gravity (think of the design of an arched bridge alongside a flat bridge, the latter either has to be more solidly built or suspended from above) or the instability due to rough roads or potholes.
It is not a major problem and you will soon get used to it as you build up experience and leg muscles.
Shorter cranks do help as they lessen the distance through which the physical mass of your legs move.

nigelnightmare
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby nigelnightmare » 25 Aug 2018, 1:44pm

Here is the ICE Tech guide.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFYVFfWQFw4

HTH

Quicksilver89
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Joined: 11 Nov 2017, 8:44pm

Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Quicksilver89 » 26 Aug 2018, 1:17pm

Here is a photo showing my current position, does that look right? I find it hard to get a high cadence, maybe my thighs are weak still?

My speed still seems to be lacking but it was windy out there today. I'd be happy if I could get to 20km/h.

https://www.strava.com/activities/1798187904.

I also have a video of my cycling but I'm not sure how to attach it on here...
Image Attachments
IMG_20180825_145549[1].jpg

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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby [XAP]Bob » 26 Aug 2018, 1:35pm

Looks a bit far out to me...

Reference the ice tech video.

As for cadence - it’s preference to some extent, but a higher cadence doesnt require more strength (if anything it’s the opposite)
A shortcut has to be a challenge, otherwise it would just be the way. No situation is so dire that panic cannot make it worse.
There are two kinds of people in this world: those can extrapolate from incomplete data.

OldBloke
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby OldBloke » 26 Aug 2018, 2:11pm

Quicksilver89

I also think you could probably bring your boom in a bit. It would be easier to tell if the camera was lower to give a side on view of your leg. As it is it does look like you're a bit too stretched out.

On your Strava you averaged nearly 15 km/h with quite a bit of climbing. For someone who is new to recumbent triking, I would say you are doing pretty good. It will take a while to develop your 'bent legs.

StephenW
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby StephenW » 26 Aug 2018, 2:56pm

Hello Quicksilver

Perhaps if you switch to clip-in pedals and cycling shoes, you will be able to comfortably spin a bit faster. If you know that your feet are securely attached to the pedals, you can relax more and focus on spinning.

Quicksilver89
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Re: Getting into the recumbent cycling

Postby Quicksilver89 » 26 Aug 2018, 3:44pm

Cool, thanks, I'll push it further back again. I feel it quite a bit in my thighs though if the boom is closer, is this because my thighs are weak and they will get better as I ride more? Or could it be due to my CP?

Yeah there are some pretty decent hills close to me! Cycling shoes would be nice but my left foot turns in, not sure that is an option?