Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
brynpoeth
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby brynpoeth » 16 Sep 2018, 9:01pm

I was at a jumble sale today, heard an adult refuse to buy a child an ice-cream

Wanted to buy the child one but I did not, was that right?
Cycling - of course, but it is far better on a Gillott..alternative facts welcome

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Paulatic
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby Paulatic » 16 Sep 2018, 9:07pm

brynpoeth wrote:I was at a jumble sale today, heard an adult refuse to buy a child an ice-cream

Wanted to buy the child one but I did not, was that right?

Very wrong to want buy one.
Very rightnot to buy one.
If the parent says No it doesn’t require anyone to undermine their decision.
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RickH
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby RickH » 16 Sep 2018, 10:01pm

brynpoeth wrote:I was at a jumble sale today, heard an adult refuse to buy a child an ice-cream

Wanted to buy the child one but I did not, was that right?

Yes unless you are playing the grandparent card! :twisted:

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Cugel
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby Cugel » 16 Sep 2018, 10:42pm

RickH wrote:
brynpoeth wrote:I was at a jumble sale today, heard an adult refuse to buy a child an ice-cream

Wanted to buy the child one but I did not, was that right?

Yes unless you are playing the grandparent card! :twisted:


When the grandson was a fairly small bairn, his mother (my dangerous daughter) was in a somewhat ideological mood about sugar. Sweeties, including ice cream, were verboten. Nevertheless, when the boy was left with us grandparents and the other grandchildren, as mummy went off to find some humus and salad leaves, we fed the lucky snapper with his first ice cream cornet.

There was guilty pleasure, indicated by concentrated slurping whilst looking guiltily towards the front door where the mammy-martinet might appear at any moment!

'Twas a small deviation from her rule, which I confess I approved of in reality. Still, a small boy should have one ice cream cornet, just for the experience. When I was a small boy, 107 years ago, I had one or two (possibly more). Also rhubarb rock, flying saucers and sherbert dips. Since then, dentists have enjoyed many a luxurious holiday at my expense.

Cugel

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bovlomov
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby bovlomov » 16 Sep 2018, 11:41pm

Cugel wrote:Also rhubarb rock, flying saucers and sherbert dips. Since then, dentists have enjoyed many a luxurious holiday at my expense.

When I was a child, the dentist used to gives us sweets while we waited. One-armed dentists are quite slow, you see, so there was usually a backlog.

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The utility cyclist
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby The utility cyclist » 17 Sep 2018, 6:16am

brynpoeth wrote:Shaving is abnormal! Wiki explains how men were conned into it to sell razor blades
Mind, just read a free lifestyle mag. A barber recommends **oiling**!! ones beard twice a day and getting it trimmed every two weeks (€€€!), he says that beards have recently become fashionable or socially acceptable! :wink:
Anyone here shave? Why?

Even when I was a middle manager and forced to work away in an open office I rarely shaved, despite the fact I got grief for it often (I'd explain why it was dumb for it to be an issue but y'know, people) I'd grow it for a time, get bored, shave it off, rinse and repeat. I shaved more when the missus said she preferred me without beard growth, it was for more than aesthetic reasons so complied more than I would have done ordinarily :wink:
I have found a cheap way to shave by resharpening bog standard disposable razors, just wish I'd thought of it/come across it sooner, it's so simple yet effective and cuts down costs a lot.
I do have shaving oil and foam but honestly if I've left it a few weeks I'll use the Remington hair trimmers I bought for £10 some 15 years ago to shave off the majority then simply use a bit of Dove or Pears soap and shave as normal. I've kept 3 disposable razors and used them in rotation all this year.

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Cugel
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby Cugel » 17 Sep 2018, 8:30am

bovlomov wrote:
Cugel wrote:Also rhubarb rock, flying saucers and sherbert dips. Since then, dentists have enjoyed many a luxurious holiday at my expense.

When I was a child, the dentist used to gives us sweets while we waited. One-armed dentists are quite slow, you see, so there was usually a backlog.


Yes, a Holland's toffee was the reward to a dentist-fraught child following the sometimes Victorian procedures. (I remember the stench of chloroform even today; and the weird dreams). It was the NHS by the time I was cast into the world, otherwise one might form a suspicion that the rascals were drumming up more business with their toffee-rewards! Perhaps they were, as old habits die hard?

Mind, the NHS also filled we lucky booming snappers with orange juice, malt and rosehip syrup, all free and meant to increase the sprouting-rate of a bairn - which it did but generally at the expense of the teef.

Cugel, still with 28 biters albeit countless implants, bridges, fillings and crowns among 'em.

fastpedaller
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby fastpedaller » 17 Sep 2018, 11:57am

Cugel wrote:
RickH wrote:
brynpoeth wrote:I was at a jumble sale today, heard an adult refuse to buy a child an ice-cream

Wanted to buy the child one but I did not, was that right?

Yes unless you are playing the grandparent card! :twisted:


When the grandson was a fairly small bairn, his mother (my dangerous daughter) was in a somewhat ideological mood about sugar. Sweeties, including ice cream, were verboten. Nevertheless, when the boy was left with us grandparents and the other grandchildren, as mummy went off to find some humus and salad leaves, we fed the lucky snapper with his first ice cream cornet.

There was guilty pleasure, indicated by concentrated slurping whilst looking guiltily towards the front door where the mammy-martinet might appear at any moment!

'Twas a small deviation from her rule, which I confess I approved of in reality. Still, a small boy should have one ice cream cornet, just for the experience. When I was a small boy, 107 years ago, I had one or two (possibly more). Also rhubarb rock, flying saucers and sherbert dips. Since then, dentists have enjoyed many a luxurious holiday at my expense.

Cugel


Ha Ha, good story. We have always tried the approach that if the 'sweet thing' is denied it becomes even more desirable. Our Daughter is now 20, but even at an earlier age her Easter eggs would survive until about August! She's been able to take or leave and generally leaves. Her first ice cream (when still in a pushchair) was freely given by the Rossi man at Southend-on-Sea, a kindly Italian who served the best ices :D At the time the coldness shocked her (we have a photo somewhere), so maybe that experience put her off sweet things for life :lol:
I understand the original Rossi family sold the business, on our last visit I asked for the special (cone with vanilla and lemon sorbet) and the (non-Italian) vendor couldn't provide - This particular delicacy was only known to the regulars :wink:

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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby Vorpal » 17 Sep 2018, 12:20pm

I'm not sure about the denial thing....

Mini V has an extreme sweet tooth, Littlest hardly likes sweet things. He does like ice cream, and some biscuits, but anything with icing, most cakes, and boiled sweets, he will turn down as 'too sweet'. Mini V on the other hand would eat out of the sugar bowl, if I'd let her.
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― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

brynpoeth
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby brynpoeth » 17 Sep 2018, 1:14pm

I think this is best:

"I have cooked some disgusting sprouts and parsnips, I bet you will not like them" :oops:
Cycling - of course, but it is far better on a Gillott..alternative facts welcome

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Cugel
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby Cugel » 18 Sep 2018, 9:40am

brynpoeth wrote:I think this is best:

"I have cooked some disgusting sprouts and parsnips, I bet you will not like them" :oops:



Hmmmmm... those children are not so dumb, I think.

No, a chocolate-covered parsnip and sprout ice cream seem more likely to work. Oh yes they do! Have you tried them? Delicious and health-giving. Also a fine laxative. :-)

Cugel, thinking exotically.

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meic
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby meic » 18 Sep 2018, 9:44am

If they dont like sprouts then just starve them until they do! :mrgreen:

Meic, the Father of two very thin and healthy children. :wink:
Yma o Hyd

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Cugel
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Re: Interfering stranger lecturing my son about bike clothing

Postby Cugel » 18 Sep 2018, 1:47pm

meic wrote:If they dont like sprouts then just starve them until they do! :mrgreen:

Meic, the Father of two very thin and healthy children. :wink:


When I were a bairn, 114 years ago, there was still rationing. Also, most had no money at all and lived on tick half the time. Thus we were all thin & starving, with only the toof-rotting malt, orange juice and rosehip syrup from the NHS keeping us healthy. (And the free school milk). Sometimes we raided abandoned wartime allotments for wild tatties and cabbages.

As I grewed, things got less austere and we could have excellent school dinners for one shilling a go (two gos if you finished first and got to the hatch for the seconds before the others). Also, one could afford the odd stick of rhubarb rock (2p).

Even with an influx of cheap and sugary sweeties, we seemed to stay thin, as no one had a car and children "played out" with the other kids from 5 years-old onwards. (No paranoid & fearful parents then). Tired, poor but happy; and healthy (apart from the odd pox or even impetigo; and a beating from some nasty biglad). :-)

Cugel, still a 50s-style kid.