Schwalbe 26” tyre query

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squeaker
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Re: Schwalbe 26” tyre query

Postby squeaker » 8 Dec 2018, 11:22am

fausto copy wrote:In repairing it I realised it was only a Greenguard tyre and the culprit was a drawing pin.
When was the last time you saw one of them :?:
Last time I went for a walk! Our local telegraph poles are covered in the things where lazy B's put up posters then fail to recover them and the pins :evil:
"42"

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531colin
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Re: Schwalbe 26” tyre query

Postby 531colin » 8 Dec 2018, 8:32pm

Long ago https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=23567
….I got into all sorts of trouble by writing that if you couldn't get your tyres on just using your hands, then you were doing it wrong.
The other morning I had to lever at the lid of a new jar of marmalade to release the vacuum before I could open the jar, and I have mellowed a bit in the intervening years; I would now say that if you can open a new jar of jam unaided then you should be able to get your tyres on just using your hands. :wink:
Many people recommend ever bigger levers, but getting your tyres on or off isn't an arms race, its a question of understanding how it all works. If you just stuff a bigger lever in and haul on it, you can abrade through the tyre carcass where it wraps under the bead.
The tyre bead (either wire or folding) is a fixed diameter. It seats on the bit of the rim known as the bead seat. The diameters of the tyre bead and the rim bead seat must be decided by somebody (ETRO?) but there is a manufacturing tolerance.
To get the tyre on or off, its necessary to get the tyre bead into the rim well all the way round; the rim well is a smaller diameter than the bead seat (or the bead) and if the bead is in the rim well that gives enough slack to get a bit of the bead over the rim, either to get the last bit on, or the first bit off.
Some combinations of tyre and rim are more difficult than others, and I get the impression that tyres in general have become more difficult to get on or off in the last (say) ten years, but that may just be arthritis. I understand that tubeless compatible rims are worse than other rims, but I have no personal experience of them.
I think the depth of the rim well is the biggest single factor in how easily tyres go on or off: I have found that even with arthritic hands I can get folding bead tyres both off and on Rigida Grizzly and Kinlin XD230 without levers; so I'm stopping using rims that make my hands hurt taking tyres off and on.
The only extra difficulty with Marathon Plus is the stiffness of the things; the puncture resistant strip is so stiff that it forces the tyre beads apart, so that when you are trying to fit a new Marathon Plus, then the bead is forced onto the bead seat instead of in the rim well, where you want it. That's the function of the toestraps in the video, they hold the bead in the rim well so you can get the last bit of bead over the rim. Once the tyre has been on and pumped up for a while, it assumes a more helpful shape, and is easier to get on and off.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XUFVrl0UT4
Last edited by 531colin on 8 Dec 2018, 8:38pm, edited 1 time in total.

simonhill
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Re: Schwalbe 26” tyre query

Postby simonhill » 9 Dec 2018, 6:53am

I just marvel at how many rims, tyres, bikes, etc some people have and how you seem to regularly swap them about.

Admittedly in hthe last couple of years I have added an almost identical Surly to what was my one and only bike and now have a new Brompton as well. Nonetheless, the rims on my touring Surly were good for 40-50,000, kms and were changed when worn out. The tyres do one or two years and are only changed when worn (about ½) out.

As I said, in my previous post, it is difficult for me to compare because I don't have anything to compare with. Some of you guys have more gear on hand, than I have used in a decade. Long may it continue and may your quest for knowledge be endless.

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Sweep
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Re: Schwalbe 26” tyre query

Postby Sweep » 9 Dec 2018, 8:09am

simonhill wrote:rims on my touring Surly were good for 40-50,000, kms and were changed when worn out.

Rim brakes simon? Which rims?
Sweep

simonhill
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Joined: 13 Jan 2007, 11:28am
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Re: Schwalbe 26” tyre query

Postby simonhill » 9 Dec 2018, 2:52pm

Sweep: I think I discussed this a bit when you asked in my recent post about Sputniks.

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531colin
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Re: Schwalbe 26” tyre query

Postby 531colin » 9 Dec 2018, 4:50pm

simonhill wrote:I just marvel at how many rims, tyres, bikes, etc some people have and how you seem to regularly swap them about......

Almost the definition of a hobby, isn't it?
I bought some carbide Grizzly rims maybe seven or more years ago when I used to ride lots of tracks, they seem set to last for ever. The Kinlin rims are disc-specific, and on a bike I got for my seventieth birthday.
I build wheels, and I grease my hubs annually (I can only think of one pair of hubs I have discarded in about the last 20 years) so its cheap and easy for me to swap stuff about.

Grarea
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Re: Schwalbe 26” tyre query

Postby Grarea » 12 Dec 2018, 5:19pm

Brucey wrote: However the stronger/more puncture resistant a tyre is, the draggier it tends to get when you run it at low pressures;

cheers


Thank you for that comment.
That is pretty interesting.
I have 26" supremes.

I was reading about reducing the pressure on tyres.
I tried it on these but I found it slowed me down.
So I kind of disagreed with the charts that I was seeing and like them at max psi.

However, I have tried playing with lower pressures on my mtb and see what people are saying.

Your comment starts to make it all make more sense.
I hadn't thought about the construction of the tyre making a difference.