Glueless Patches

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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mjr
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby mjr » 30 Sep 2020, 11:02am

mercalia wrote:if they dont last why bother at all? whats this good for a temporary repair, how much more effort does it take to do it properly with rubber soln and patch? All the effort is taking the tyre off? if the weather is bad you just change the tube. I dont get it.

A glueless patch saves the time needed to apply the rubber and let it go tacky, and chalk over the top. That means you don't have to keep the area dry as long, which is a benefit now weather is worsening - and the rubber takes even longer to tack in bad weather. Glueless has a higher success rate than sealant cans and it puts less mess on the bike, but it's not quite as quick as a can. A glueless patch pack is much smaller than a conventional patch kit, too.

No need to take the wheel out and whole tyre off unless you're someone who likes to show off their skill in wheel removal and bike balancing - just pull out the bit of tube with the puncture.

If you need to be somewhere by a certain time, it's well worth carrying both glueless patches and a can. I've caught trains after puncturing that I probably would have missed otherwise.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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[XAP]Bob
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby [XAP]Bob » 30 Sep 2020, 11:09am

Why take the wheel out? Use cantilevered wheels and there is no need. :mrgreen:

I have also used sidewinder tubes (linear tubes) to good effect, just tie the old tube round the chain stay/seatstay and pop in a linear tube, then when you get home you can warm up and then patch and replace the tube you tied out of the way without ever removing the wheel.
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Jdsk
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby Jdsk » 30 Sep 2020, 11:31am

[XAP]Bob wrote:Why take the wheel out? Use cantilevered wheels and there is no need.

One of my children has just discovered that with the trailer tandem trike. With great delight. : - )

Jonathan

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NUKe
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby NUKe » 30 Sep 2020, 11:44am

Only ever used the Parktool ones' , used on higher pressure tyres ie 23mm race type tyres which are 100psi plus they will fail, eventually. on lower pressure tyres they seem to last a lot longer, although to be honest its nearly as quick to put a proper patch on, so I carry both and only use the Park ones, if say for instance the glue has gone of in the traditional patch kit.
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iandusud
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby iandusud » 30 Sep 2020, 12:15pm

ANTONISH wrote:I think we've had this thread before.
I've been using Lezyne patches for some years now. I no longer bother with the traditional feather edge patches (which I first started using in 1955).
The Lezyne patches IME don't deteriorate like some other self adhesive patches.
I did use Park patches perhaps about fifteen years ago - I found that they didn't last and had to be replaced - ok for a temporary fix.
I don't suffer many punctures and when I have it's often cold and wet - not good conditions when waiting for adhesive solvent to evaporate.
Preparation of the tube is essential for either type of patch.
Materials have changed over the years.


It's good to have a review of a specific product rather than general comments. Out of interest what size tyres/tubes are you using these on? I totally agree about proper preparation. The one I did yesterday was properly prepped and the patch stuck very soundly. Of course what I don't know is what it was like once inflated in the tyre. However the tyre in question was 700x35 and the tube was an appropriately sized one so I wouldn't expect it to stretch much.

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mjr
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby mjr » 30 Sep 2020, 12:36pm

iandusud wrote:However I do have some self-adhesive patches from Wilco that someone gave me so I thought I give one a go. I was pleasantly surprised that it stuck very securely. Time will tell if it holds up, but I was wondering what other peoples experience of them are?

If you mean Wilco (a car and bike parts chain in East Anglia, the Midlands and Yorkshire), I think they sell Weldtite Red Devils which are fine temporary patches which will survive a long time on 40-60psi town bike tubes. Not so long on 80-100psi ones.

If you mean Wilko = Wilkinson's, they sell Slime Scabs which are even better, but they also sell their own brand ones which are a total randomness as to who actually made them and they change type over time while using the same packets. They have sold ones that seemed identical to Weldtite, but they've also sold something like the rubbish yellow ones sold by Half-odds.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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iandusud
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby iandusud » 30 Sep 2020, 1:36pm

mjr wrote:
iandusud wrote:However I do have some self-adhesive patches from Wilco that someone gave me so I thought I give one a go. I was pleasantly surprised that it stuck very securely. Time will tell if it holds up, but I was wondering what other peoples experience of them are?

If you mean Wilco (a car and bike parts chain in East Anglia, the Midlands and Yorkshire), I think they sell Weldtite Red Devils which are fine temporary patches which will survive a long time on 40-60psi town bike tubes. Not so long on 80-100psi ones.

If you mean Wilko = Wilkinson's, they sell Slime Scabs which are even better, but they also sell their own brand ones which are a total randomness as to who actually made them and they change type over time while using the same packets. They have sold ones that seemed identical to Weldtite, but they've also sold something like the rubbish yellow ones sold by Half-odds.


The ones I have are red and oval shaped as here: https://www.wilko.com/en-uk/wilko-self- ... /p/0258276

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Sweep
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby Sweep » 30 Sep 2020, 1:43pm

mercalia wrote:if they dont last why bother at all? whats this good for a temporary repair, how much more effort does it take to do it properly with rubber soln and patch? All the effort is taking the tyre off? if the weather is bad you just change the tube. I dont get it.

agree entirely.
Their only purpose for them I can think of, as mentioned upthread, is if you run out of new (new includes previously patched with normal patches) tubes - this has only happened to me once that I can remember - I always carry two spare tubes.
Sweep

Bmblbzzz
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby Bmblbzzz » 30 Sep 2020, 2:01pm

They also make for a marginally more compact tool kit.

More to the point, they're temporary as in not eternal, not as in short lived. Decent quality glueless patches, such as Lezyne, will last for years.

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Sweep
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby Sweep » 30 Sep 2020, 2:07pm

Bmblbzzz wrote:They also make for a marginally more compact tool kit.

More to the point, they're temporary as in not eternal, not as in short lived. Decent quality glueless patches, such as Lezyne, will last for years.

mm
in my experience, good patches, like TipTop, if applied properly (and this is pretty easy to do if you do it in peace at home - not at the roadside) last forever - as good as the original bit of tube they are covering.
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mjr
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby mjr » 30 Sep 2020, 2:23pm

How can anyone be unable to think of the benefit of a faster and cleaner repair less vulnerable to cold and wet conditions, even after being told of it by multiple posters?
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby Bmblbzzz » 30 Sep 2020, 2:40pm

Sweep wrote:
Bmblbzzz wrote:They also make for a marginally more compact tool kit.

More to the point, they're temporary as in not eternal, not as in short lived. Decent quality glueless patches, such as Lezyne, will last for years.

mm
in my experience, good patches, like TipTop, if applied properly (and this is pretty easy to do if you do it in peace at home - not at the roadside) last forever - as good as the original bit of tube they are covering.

Yes, in theory a tube that was 50% decently applied patches would be perfectly usable. In practice, as you say, while this is easy to do at home - in the warm and dry, with no time pressure - it's difficult at the roadside, particularly if wet and cold. Also, you need to know how to do it! (I only appreciated quite recently the point of sanding the tube) Therefore, glueless patches for the roadside if no spare tube, and patch them "properly" at home.

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Sweep
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby Sweep » 1 Oct 2020, 6:31am

mjr wrote:How can anyone be unable to think of the benefit of a faster and cleaner repair less vulnerable to cold and wet conditions, even after being told of it by multiple posters?

??
Is this a reply to my post immediately above?
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francovendee
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby francovendee » 1 Oct 2020, 8:34am

Unless you can see a nail or thorn in the tyre it's hard to find the hole in a tube.
You have to remove the tube anyway and I don't bother trying to find the hole and fix it. Far easier to replace the tube with the spare and fix it at home. I do carry glue and patches if I get another puncture.

ANTONISH
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Re: Glueless Patches

Postby ANTONISH » 1 Oct 2020, 8:43am

iandusud wrote:
ANTONISH wrote:I think we've had this thread before.
I've been using Lezyne patches for some years now. I no longer bother with the traditional feather edge patches (which I first started using in 1955).
The Lezyne patches IME don't deteriorate like some other self adhesive patches.
I did use Park patches perhaps about fifteen years ago - I found that they didn't last and had to be replaced - ok for a temporary fix.
I don't suffer many punctures and when I have it's often cold and wet - not good conditions when waiting for adhesive solvent to evaporate.
Preparation of the tube is essential for either type of patch.
Materials have changed over the years.


It's good to have a review of a specific product rather than general comments. Out of interest what size tyres/tubes are you using these on? I totally agree about proper preparation. The one I did yesterday was properly prepped and the patch stuck very soundly. Of course what I don't know is what it was like once inflated in the tyre. However the tyre in question was 700x35 and the tube was an appropriately sized one so I wouldn't expect it to stretch much.


I've used them on 700x25 but currently I'm using 700x28.
Incidentally like most people I carry a spare tube (or two) but changing a tube involves removing the wheel.
I'm so old school that I try to locate the puncture first and the pull out a small section of inner tube to patch it in situ. IMO that is quicker than changing a tube.
If necessary I will change the tube. Then I repair the puncture at home - still using the lezyne patches unless there is a sizeable split in which case I discard the tube.
The only drawback I find with these patches is the "cheese grater " roughening tool provided - I use fine sandpaper in preference.