Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

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st599_uk
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by st599_uk »

Slowtwitch wrote: 24 Feb 2022, 9:57am In France they're are a lot of one way streets that cyclistd are allowed to ride down, against the traffic!
Same in Germany - you see signs saying Einbahnstraße - Fahrradfrei (One way street - Bicycles free to pass) or no entry signs with Fahrrad Frei to say bicycles can pass

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Chris Jeggo
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Chris Jeggo »

When CUK was CTC and was something to do with touring, the information sheet for each country detailed the differences between its rules and ours. All gone now.
Slowtwitch
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Slowtwitch »

Chris Jeggo wrote: 24 Feb 2022, 12:25pm When CUK was CTC and was something to do with touring, the information sheet for each country detailed the differences between its rules and ours. All gone now.
That is a real shame. I remember that being a big plus for signing up to membership.
Slowtwitch
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Slowtwitch »

I must abmit riding the wrong way down a one way street into traffic, legally, its a bit of a blast! :lol:
simonhill
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by simonhill »

Worrying about the different laws in different countries is something I've never thought about.

All I know is which side of the road to ride, then follow what the locals do.

Cripes, one more thing to worry about.
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foxyrider
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by foxyrider »

simonhill wrote: 28 Feb 2022, 8:14am Worrying about the different laws in different countries is something I've never thought about.

All I know is which side of the road to ride, then follow what the locals do.

Cripes, one more thing to worry about.
+1
Convention? what's that then?
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by mattheus »

simonhill wrote: 28 Feb 2022, 8:14am Worrying about the different laws in different countries is something I've never thought about.

All I know is which side of the road to ride, then follow what the locals do.

Cripes, one more thing to worry about.
No need to worry Simon! xxx

That strategy will see you through most of the time.

(although non-h*lmet wearers will find it useful to check local laws).
Psamathe
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Psamathe »

My understanding is in NL if there is a cycle path then you are not permitted to use the road - Is my understanding wrong?

Additionally there are some roads without cycle path you are not allowed to cycle on. I can't remember the signs but in Lelystad I was tired and wanted to get to supermarket and decided to ignore the law and ... drivers were not happy, lots of hooting of horns but no threats, no shouting and no close "punishment passes" (it was only a mile'ish).

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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Bmblbzzz »

st599_uk wrote: 23 Feb 2022, 5:09pm
Vorpal wrote: 23 Feb 2022, 4:01pm
Turning right on red is allowed for cyclists in FR*, BE*, NL** DE***, DK, SI

* in 30 km/h zones
** when marked with a sign "Rechtsaf voor fietsers vrij" (of course segregated paths often permit this by design)
*** also allowed for drivers of motor vehicles
With the proviso that there's probably a pedestrian crossing just around the corner which has right of way.

ECF used to do a lexicon which included descriptions of some of the odder signage.
And in PL****

****When the green arrow comes on, all vehicles can treat the red light as a stop sign if turning right. But you must also give way to the people on the pedestrian crossing, which is not round the corner but straight in front of you. Similarly, when turning right or left on green, you have to give way to pedestrians on the crossing across the road you are turning into.
tatanab
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by tatanab »

Psamathe wrote: 28 Feb 2022, 8:46pm My understanding is in NL if there is a cycle path then you are not permitted to use the road - Is my understanding wrong?
I believe that of Belgium too.
Slowtwitch
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Slowtwitch »

Something to watch out for in Spain (less so in Portugal but it did happen to me): if you chain your bike outside a shop or a restaurant for any longish time (an hour plus for example) the police will come and snap your lock and pound the bike. It's happened to me twice in Spain, its a bit of a shock, but they do leave you a note!

Both times I was able to recover the bike without a fine, but only because I played the dumb tourist. And they do not take kindly to you cycling without a helmet. This is seldom enforced in Catalonia but it is in other parts of Spain.
Jdsk
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Jdsk »

Recent discussion of helmets in Spain:
viewtopic.php?t=149490

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mjr
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by mjr »

tatanab wrote: 28 Feb 2022, 9:03pm
Psamathe wrote: 28 Feb 2022, 8:46pm My understanding is in NL if there is a cycle path then you are not permitted to use the road - Is my understanding wrong?
I believe that of Belgium too.
Then you're both wrong. It's not the cycle path existing that bans you, but the signed ban. White bike on blue circle makes it a compulsory instruction in those countries, plus France, Germany, Denmark, Portugal and more. On a blue square, or a "no vehicles except cycles" means it's optional.

One big difference is that the compulsory signs are far less used in France and Portugal than the others and you're much more likely to be honked and fined for disobedience in the Netherlands and Germany.
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Bmblbzzz
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Bmblbzzz »

Isn't the meaning of a white sign on blue circle interpreted as "must" pretty much Europe-wide? UK is the only exception I'm aware of, but there are probably a few others (I'd guess IE, and let's follow that up with MT and CY). As distinct from the UK interpretation of "Only".
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Re: Guide to cycling traffic law in European countries

Post by Vorpal »

tatanab wrote: 28 Feb 2022, 9:03pm
Psamathe wrote: 28 Feb 2022, 8:46pm My understanding is in NL if there is a cycle path then you are not permitted to use the road - Is my understanding wrong?
I believe that of Belgium too.
It's a bit more complex than that (mjr posted while I was writing)

For Belgium: (available in French & Flemish) https://www.belgium.be/nl/mobiliteit/fi ... s/plichten But actually, the legal obligation only applies if you can see a round blue sign, with a bike emblem from your direction of travel. In addition, there are exceptions if it is blocked or in a dangerous condition. The police explain it here (with some further links) https://www.politie.be/5388/vragen/verk ... r-fietsers Regarding cycle lanes (on the road), Drivers believe that you are obliged to use them & will beep at you, if you don't, but the only legal obligation is to keep to the right. It is acknowledged that cycle lanes are not always safe, and explicitly acknowledged that they should be avoided on roundabouts where there is a significant risk of conflict. Unfortunately, the highway code for cyclists appears to be only French & Flemish pdf.

For the Netherlands: it is similar but optional paths are usually labelled with a rectangular sign that says 'fietspad'. there is an English version of the Netherlands highway code as of 2013 here (pdf) https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/binar ... 013_uk.pdf
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