Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
bogmyrtle
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby bogmyrtle » 23 Mar 2014, 10:02am

I've had hand-me-downs of varying sizes and shapes. They all ride differently but I find I adapt to each bike within a couple of rides. I don't dislike any of them. I think as long as the bike fits and there isn't any toe overlap any minor grumbles can be either accepted or sorted out.
A bike does more miles to the banana than a Porsche.

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Cunobelin
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby Cunobelin » 23 Mar 2014, 11:17am

I did this with my Gekko

However I knew the company, knew the geometry and it was sufficiently like one of my other trikes to know that it would fit, and had ridden the Scorpion which is also similar.

An informed decision is fine, but if I hadn't had that knowledge I would not have ordered.

beardy
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby beardy » 23 Mar 2014, 11:34am

Yes because it would take me about 1,000 miles to get the fine adjustments right and another 1,000 miles to know I had them right.

A quick spin around the car park would tell me nothing except whether it was possible to ride the bike.

A trip to Spa for an extended ride would cost £160 in motor mileage and at least a day of my life and I still wouldnt glean enough from a fifty mile ride.

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easyroller
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby easyroller » 23 Mar 2014, 12:27pm

The 3 last bikes I bought were all without test rides, but with PLENTY of research beforehand.

Totally happy with all three of them.

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jezer
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby jezer » 23 Mar 2014, 12:37pm

For quite a few years I've bought bikes off the internet, so no test rides and no problems. By the same token I don't bother with test drives in cars either. Modern ones are all pretty much the same, and as long as I can fit a bike rack that's all I'm concerned about :)
Power to the pedals

PH
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby PH » 23 Mar 2014, 1:27pm

The bike that will feel best on a test ride will be the one close to the one you are used to riding. If you know you've already got that spot on, then a test ride will be good for spotting the subtle differences between models that already match that knowledge. This isn't cycle specific, it's the way our minds work, from shoes to sofas, we all have a tendency to buy the familiar.

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Mick F
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby Mick F » 23 Mar 2014, 1:30pm

PH wrote: ................. we all have a tendency to buy the familiar.
Spot on.
Mick F. Cornwall

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NEvans
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby NEvans » 23 Mar 2014, 6:39pm

Ok my answer to my question:

While I ordered and brought am Orbit Harrier plus of 12 years ago based on reviews, and was very happy with what I got (done exactly what it said on the tin). The wife having riden a lot less we were not so sure on what she wanted. To give her an idea we booked through Evans a Dawes Karakum and a Dawes Galaxy Plus to try out. We were going to order the Orbit with Butterfly bars same as the Karakum has, she has a mountain bike but found the Butterly bars too big for her liking and the bike too upright for touring.

Surprisingly she loved the Galaxy Plus, not having had drops before she was very against the idea previously, but then after trying them with the bar end shifters she immediately liked them and found them easy to get on with.

So for someone with a lot less road time, I think there was a need to try it out first.
Newton's first law; Large body mass and weight equals fast going down hill but slow going up,
So blame Newton not me when you're bored waiting at the top of the hill.

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NEvans
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Re: Would you buy a bike you couldn't test ride

Postby NEvans » 23 Mar 2014, 6:58pm

Edwards wrote:Having read your other thread my answer would be no.
The good lady is going to be carrying nothing heavier that YOUR Credit Card, so does not need a heavy stiff frame.

I am wondering about the Hub Gears, is it because she is not certain about other types of systems or is that what she is used too?


The Galaxy plus brought will be somewhat heaver and stiffer than a lot lighter sportive/audax machine (the Orbit frames generally fall into that bracket), but she felt comfortable (can't tell from quick test ride I know people will say). But out for four hours today, probably will change the seat, but liked it.

The 11 speed Hub Gears; Salesman and Reviews are saying the best thing since sliced bread, and I think would probably be better (although I could be completely wrong) setup on a touring bike.
Newton's first law; Large body mass and weight equals fast going down hill but slow going up,
So blame Newton not me when you're bored waiting at the top of the hill.